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Max Taxable

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Although I'm a 1B here in Texas (Under 65 but with chronic medical condition) my condition is very well managed and I'm not that much of an exposure risk since I'm pretty isolated, I'll wait for when a larger part of the population has had the shot. I'm seeing my cardiologist in two weeks, maybe he'll have something to say about that so I'm fluid. Not getting in any hurry to get on the list at least until I talk with him. Not sure if you need some kind of chit from your doctor anyway, if you're under 65.
 

Max Taxable

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Please thank him for me.
He had a very to me, good outlook on death. "When it's your time it's your time and no amount of doctors pills potions or procedures, no amount of money property or possessions, none of that is gonna help when it's your time." And if surgery saved someone? Or if someone avoided a certian fatal accident or something? It simply wasn't their time. He said he learned this philosophy, in war.

He would have considered this covid thing a silly fad, he never believed in shots or any such.
 

Mark Booth

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Our doctor told us both my wife and I are high risk for potentially serious complications if we catch the virus. He said he expects us to be eligible for the vaccine between mid January and the end of January. We will be getting the vaccine at first available opportunity. We have several friends and family members in healthcare that have already received their first shot, no issues.

Mark
 

BobO'Link

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Sorry to hear that, sir. Mine passed a few years ago. He was Army but I loved him just the same.
I had to laugh at that line. :)

A very close friend was a Marine (E4), left the service, couldn't stand civilian life so rejoined in the Army (they made him a Sgt.) and always said not to hold it against him as the Army was an easier life than the Marines (and he was all about "easier" at that time). He "retired" less than a year later with full disability when a motorcycle accident claimed a leg. He passed away 10 years ago from complications due to pneumonia. I miss him.
 

John Dirk

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I had to laugh at that line. :)

A very close friend was a Marine (E4), left the service, couldn't stand civilian life so rejoined in the Army (they made him a Sgt.) and always said not to hold it against him as the Army was an easier life than the Marines (and he was all about "easier" at that time). He "retired" less than a year later with full disability when a motorcycle accident claimed a leg. He passed away 10 years ago from complications due to pneumonia. I miss him.
Ribbing between the service branches is a time-honored tradition but, in the end, we're all one. Glad this gave you a laugh. very sorry about your friend.
 

BobO'Link

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One of my wife's cousins, head of nursing at a local center, came by today and reported she'd received her first innocculation a few days ago. She got the Moderna vaccine and reported no pain during injection with a bit of soreness in her arm at the injection site for a day or two and slight swelling of the lymph nodes under the arm which'd received the injection. Something she said wasn't unexpected and is normal.
 

John Dirk

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One of my wife's cousins, head of nursing at a local center, came by today and reported she'd received her first innocculation a few days ago. She got the Moderna vaccine and reported no pain during injection with a bit of soreness in her arm at the injection site for a day or two and slight swelling of the lymph nodes under the arm which'd received the injection. Something she said wasn't unexpected and is normal.

My arm is still a bit sore today, a full 48 hours after having received the vaccine but other than that I feel great. It feels like it did when my brothers would punch me in the arm on my birthday when we were kids.
 

Max Taxable

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Which by the way I love the strategy employed in these vaccines. It's not a Salk-type model. As I have come to understand it, we're introducing an antagonist to the protein this virus and really all SARS viruses, use to attach themselves to our cells. Once you have both doses your cells are protected from it latching on. Prevents the illness associated with it. Keeps us from having to have a different vaccine for each variant that comes out, like we have with flu.

We achieve herd immunity via exposure, which this does not prevent at all. We build antibodies to the virus the natural way. Which means, yes we can still catch carry and spread this virus, at least until it dies in our system. Can't reproduce or even incubate if it can't latch onto our cells. This is also the reason we were able to produce this in record time vs. the Salk way. It's genius.
 

John Dirk

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Which by the way I love the strategy employed in these vaccines. It's not a Salk-type model. As I have come to understand it, we're introducing an antagonist to the protein this virus and really all SARS viruses, use to attach themselves to our cells. Once you have both doses your cells are protected from it latching on. Prevents the illness associated with it. Keeps us from having to have a different vaccine for each variant that comes out, like we have with flu.

We achieve herd immunity via exposure, which this does not prevent at all. We build antibodies to the virus the natural way. Which means, yes we can still catch carry and spread this virus, at least until it dies in our system. Can't reproduce or even incubate if it can't latch onto our cells. This is also the reason we were able to produce this in record time vs. the Salk way. It's genius.
Must be because 99% of what you said went right over my head. :D
 

Max Taxable

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Must be because 99% of what you said went right over my head. :D
The Salk model was to make the vaccine out of samples of the dead virus. This was a breakthrough, previously all we had was giving you the live virus in a small dose, so you would then build up immunity to it without actually catching the disease. (Hopefully) Salk's method ensured you could not get the disease period, once you built up immunity. But his method was tricky, and took months to make and years to test.

This stuff today - we found a protien the virus uses to infiltrate our cells and incubate and multiply. Once this happens the virus makes us sick and can kill. We introduce an antagonist to that protein and make your body produce it, so that if you catch this virus it can't do much except eventually die. But while the virus is in us we have time to develop antibodies to the virus naturally and without getting sick, and become immune. So that if it gets in our bloodstream again it just gets killed outright by our immune system. Accomplishing the same thing Salk did, but without giving us any part of the virus alive or dead.
 

JohnRice

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The Salk model was to make the vaccine out of samples of the dead virus. This was a breakthrough, previously all we had was giving you the live virus in a small dose, so you would then build up immunity to it without actually catching the disease. (Hopefully) Salk's method ensured you could not get the disease period, once you built up immunity. But his method was tricky, and took months to make and years to test.

This stuff today - we found a protien the virus uses to infiltrate our cells and incubate and multiply. Once this happens the virus makes us sick and can kill. We introduce an antagonist to that protein and make your body produce it, so that if you catch this virus it can't do much except eventually die. But while the virus is in us we have time to develop antibodies to the virus naturally and without getting sick, and become immune. So that if it gets in our bloodstream again it just gets killed outright by our immune system. Accomplishing the same thing Salk did, but without giving us any part of the virus alive or dead.
It's also why it is, as I understand it, essentially computer modeled (for lack of a better term) and can be "manufactured" instead of having to be grown, which is a lot slower. Also why it is so incredibly effective, where the Salk type vaccines tend to be, at best, 60% effective. Now it just needs to be less difficult to store and transport, if the temperature requirements can be dealt with.
 

Max Taxable

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It's also why it is, as I understand it, essentially computer modeled (for lack of a better term) and can be "manufactured" instead of having to be grown, which is a lot slower. Also why it is so incredibly effective, where the Salk type vaccines tend to be, at best, 60% effective.
Yeah it's just a pharmaceutical we can quickly and inexpensively mass produce instead of incubating and growing a virus in eggs, killing it then injecting people with it. Takes way too long and way too costly and there's way too much margin for error.
Now it just needs to be less difficult to store and transport, if the temperature requirements can be dealt with.
Whole thing reminds me a little of the short "war" between Sony Betamax and VHS, which system was going to dominate the market. Some versions of this same vaccine can be just refrigerated, don't need the sub-zero storage and handling, and probably become the dominant version of this same thing.

But yeah these are 90s percent effective vs the 60 percent or so of what we have for flu for example.
 

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