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The Bible (1966) (1 Viewer)

moviebuff75

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The blu-ray has Intermission music while the card stays on screen. Did the original theatrical prints also have Entr'Acte music or is this the correct presentation? Also, I have never seen a screen credit for D-150 on any home video version.
 

John Skoda

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I've got a souvenir program from THE BIBLE, and it only says D-150 because they put "THE BIBLE was filmed in D-150" with a rubber stamp on the front cover. Also, the soundtrack album doesn't mention the process, but just says "Produced in 70mm." Maybe they were late in deciding on the name of the process?
 

BobO'Link

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?? Entr'Acte *is* "Intermission." The BR plays the same as it did theatrically with no overture and a ~4 minute intermission with a card and music.
 

Jack P

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I remember years ago when the first Laser Disc release played the end credits music over a black screen and forgot to give us the credits!
 

DFurr

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The Bible was filmed in 65mm with release prints in 35mm and 70mm. Sound mix was 3 channel stereo, LCR, no surround. 2:35 and 2:20
 

Thomas T

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?? Entr'Acte *is* "Intermission." The BR plays the same as it did theatrically with no overture and a ~4 minute intermission with a card and music.
Actually, the entr'acte isn't the intermission. It's the "overture" for the second act of the film. Example: In Ben-Hur, Charlton Heston walks away from the camera as the leaves blow behind him and Miklos Rozsa's score rises as an intermission card is displayed on the screen. The lights come up and people go get their popcorn or go to the bathroom. When the entr'acte begins, it alerts the movie is about to start and the lights dim shortly before the end of the entr'acte and the curtains open and the film begins.

Sometimes there is an extended piece of music for the intermission but it is not the same as an entr'acte. The Blue Max is an example. As I recall, the blu ray runs the extended intermission music and the entr'acte together and you can actually hear when the intermission music stops and the entr'acte begins. This was not how it was done in its theatrical incarnation. There was an actual intermission between the intermission music and the entr'acte.

And I assure you, The Bible's intermission was longer than 4 minutes. You'd be lucky to get into and out of men's room in four minutes.
 
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BobO'Link

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You say tomato, I say tomahto...

Entr'acte means "between the acts". It can mean a pause between two parts of a stage production, synonymous to an intermission (this is nowadays the more common meaning in French), but it more often (in English) indicates a piece of music performed between acts of a theatrical production.

In the case of stage musicals, the entr'acte serves as the overture of act 2 (and sometimes acts 3 and 4, as in Carmen). In films that were meant to be shown with an intermission, there was frequently a specially recorded entr'acte on the soundtrack between the first and second half of the film, although this practice died.

From trivia on the film The Bible: "(At around one hour and twenty minutes) There is a four-minute intermission."

Theater owners *may* have opted for a longer, silent, intermission period, after all, they'd get more concession sales.
 
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RichMurphy

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Theater owners *may* have opted for a longer, silent, intermission period, after all, they'd get more concession sales.
At every roadshow engagement I attended in the '60s and '70s, there was ALWAYS a longer, silent intermission period before the entr'acte played. What would be the point of just playing music for four minutes in the middle of the movie?

Plus, remember that deluxe theaters of the day usually sat 1000+ people. The thought of that many people buying snacks and hitting the restroom within four minutes is, to be kind, highly unlikely.
 

Douglas R

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At every roadshow engagement I attended in the '60s and '70s, there was ALWAYS a longer, silent intermission period before the entr'acte played. What would be the point of just playing music for four minutes in the middle of the movie?

Plus, remember that deluxe theaters of the day usually sat 1000+ people. The thought of that many people buying snacks and hitting the restroom within four minutes is, to be kind, highly unlikely.
Correct! The start of the entr’acte music was also a means of indicating to the audience that part 2 of the film would shortly begin.
 
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B-ROLL

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Correct! The start of the entr’acte music was also a means of indicating to the audience that part 2 of the film would shortly begin.
I also vaguely recall - before movie theaters became multi-plexes - they would also dim some of the lobby lights two or three times a few minutes before the show or second half started.
 
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"The Bible" roadshow version was exhibited in Sydney at Hoyt's Century - a narrow 70MM venue with a 13 -14 metre wide screen seating around 900. It was definitely not D-150 even though the end credits indicate it was photographed in the process, however it was advertised as "in 70MM and 6-track stereophonic sound'. It did have a 15-20 minute intermission, followed by an Entr'acte introducing Part Two of the film. I later saw it at one of Hoyts major suburban houses (the Hurstville Savoy) in 35MM, with the intermission but the print was of course missing the Entr'acte (the normal practice for 35MM mono sound general releases).
 

moviebuff75

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The 2 cd soundtrack release has a 7 minute Intermission track. Not all of the music on this release was used though. So, either the Entr'Acte music is missing, or they used it as the Intermission card is displayed.
 

DP 70

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Tho original 70mm prints had a D-150 tag at the end of the credits this tag is not on the new 70mm DTS prints or the dvd or blu Ray.
 

moviebuff75

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Do you know where it was placed? Before Color by DeLuxe? Or at the very end, after the RELEASED BY TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX?
I assume it read: Filmed in
D-150
 

cinemel1

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"The Bible" roadshow version was exhibited in Sydney at Hoyt's Century - a narrow 70MM venue with a 13 -14 metre wide screen seating around 900. It was definitely not D-150 even though the end credits indicate it was photographed in the process, however it was advertised as "in 70MM and 6-track stereophonic sound'. It did have a 15-20 minute intermission, followed by an Entr'acte introducing Part Two of the film. I later saw it at one of Hoyts major suburban houses (the Hurstville Savoy) in 35MM, with the intermission but the print was of course missing the Entr'acte (the normal practice for 35MM mono sound general releases).
I’ve seen several former roadshow films at Fathom Events showings at a Cinemark Theatre. For Ben-Hur & Lawrence of Arabia they just played right through the entr’acte music for the intermission with descending numbers on the screen leading to the 2nd part of the film. You had to make a quick trip to the rest room not to miss the beginning of part 2. At least they were playing these films. I enjoyed every one. The films were sparsely attended by mostly older viewers. When they showed Ben-Hur, younger audience members were laughing and though something was wrong in the projection booth. In subsequent showings a short statement was place on the screen explaining that the film was originally exhibited with a musical introduction.
 

Peter Apruzzese

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I’ve seen several former roadshow films at Fathom Events showings at a Cinemark Theatre. For Ben-Hur & Lawrence of Arabia they just played right through the entr’acte music for the intermission with descending numbers on the screen leading to the 2nd part of the film. You had to make a quick trip to the rest room not to miss the beginning of part 2. At least they were playing these films. I enjoyed every one. The films were sparsely attended by mostly older viewers. When they showed Ben-Hur, younger audience members were laughing and though something was wrong in the projection booth. In subsequent showings a short statement was place on the screen explaining that the film was originally exhibited with a musical introduction.

If theaters still used curtains and knew how to handle their house lights there would not be any confusion.
 

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