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The Alfred Hitchcock Filmography - A Chronological viewing

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Nelson Au, Jan 26, 2019.

  1. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

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    iconfess.

    I Confess

    1952
    95 minutes B&W 1.37:1
    Cast:
    Montgomery Clift - Father Michael William Logan
    Anne Baxter - Ruth Grandfort
    Karl Malden - Inspector Larrue
    Brian Aherne - Willy Robertson
    Roger Dann - Pierre Grandfort
    Dolly Haas - Alma Keller
    Charles Andre - Father Millars
    O E Hasse - Otto Keller
    Judson Pratt - Det. Murphy
    Ovila Légaré - Villette
    Gilles Pelletier - Father
    Based on the play by Paul Anthelme
    Screenplay by: George Tabori, William Archibald
    Directed by - Alfred Hitchcock
    Production Studio - Warner Brothers
    Viewed 8/17/19

    Warner Archive Blu Ray, 2016
    Also available in the Alfred Hitchcock The Signature Collection box set, Warner Brothers, 2004

    Synopsis

    Father Michael Logan is a devout catholic priest who is suspected of murdering a shady lawyer. The true killer is feeling guilt ridden and confesses his crime to Father Logan because he is bound to the confidentiality of the confessional, so he cannot speak about the confession. And so he is unable to properly defend himself.

    Impressions

    This is the first time I’ve seen I Confess and again another film I had no knowledge of its exact plot. I did hear some short bits Hitchcock mentions about the film in his Truffaut interviews, but I still did not know the plot. I was a little apprehensive of watching it like I was a little apprehensive of watching The Paradine Case because of all the less then enthusiastic reactions to the earlier film. This film was unknown to me and so I didn’t know what to expect.

    I thought I Confess was a little slow at times at the start, but it did have a pretty cool start with the film noir look of the Direction signs and the night shots of the killer leaving the scene and the long large shadows that are used. So visually, the film is a feast.

    Otto Keller is the caretaker of the church, which is located in Quebec City where the film is set. His wife, Alma is the house keeper of the church. They both are hard working and to try to earn a little more, Otto works partime for Villette, a shady lawyer, as his gardener. Otto confesses to his wife that he tried to steal some money from Villette and in the process, is caught and Otto accidentally kills Villette. His guilt over the murder has him confessing to Father Logan. This causes a serious problem for Father Logan as a series of circumstances lead the police inspector to suspect Father Logan.

    Ruth Grandfort is an old friend of Father Logan. They knew each other when they were very young and fell in love before he went to the war and came back with a new passion for the clerical life rather then being with Ruth. But Ruth never stopped loving Logan. Seeing Father Logan in trouble, she has to tell the police the truth of her relationship with Father Logan through a flashback.

    There is more involved in the story that Ruth tells the police that clears Father Logan, but that isn’t enough and Father Logan is still suspected of the murder.

    Otto’s wife through out the whole process of the confession and the trial is wracked with her own desire to protect her husband and help the good Father. Father Logan had helped the couple. So she was very conflicted.

    I was surprised by this film. At first it seemed like a soapy romance story with a murder until the flashback sequence upended my expectations and the police expectations too. It’s interesting that the source material of the play does play into expectations, but the studio would not want the controversy of a story of a priest who has a love affair and is a murderer.

    I thought the cast was terrific. Montgomery Clift is very stoic and you can see his internal conflict and struggle throughout. Anne Baxter was rather glamorous as the wife of Pierre Grandfort, a member of the Quebec government. Dolly Haas was very sympathetic as Alma. Karl Malden was interesting as I’ve seen very few of his early roles. But I could not help but see early signs of Inspector Stone, his character in the TV series The Streets of San Francisco. He plays Inspector Larrue with similar characteristics. When the killer is accidentally made to tell the truth, Larrue’s reaction is so telling as he realizes he was wrong about Logan.

    Overall, this is a hidden trinket in the Hitchcock filmography. I see it was met with mixed reviews upon release. I felt after the initial early part of the film, it became more interesting as we learn the truth of Ruth and Logan’s past from the flashback. And then the suspense of how Hitchcock manipulates the viewer with the reactions of Otto and Alma as they are constantly in fear of whether Father Logan would break his vow and how Alma is torn with her sense of doing the right thing. Quite a serious change after Strangers on a Train.

    i Confess cameo.

    Wow, next up three of my favorite Hitchcocks in a row, Dial M for Murder, Rear Window and To Catch a Thief.
     
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  2. Matt Hough

    Matt Hough Director
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    The Blu-ray of I, Confess was so beautiful that it brought me around a bit on my opinion on the movie from rather bland indifference to a more positive feeling about it. The protagonist is certainly in a tricky situation in going to the gallows if he obeys the seal of the confessional or nullifying his position if he breaks the sanctity of his office and reveals the killer. I did think Malden's inspector was rather slow to realize what was going on.
     
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  3. bujaki

    bujaki Producer

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    For those of you who subscribe to The Criterion Channel, a few of Hitchcock's Studio Canal's releases are showing, including the rare Champagne (1928), without a score. Not great, but has some very interesting stylistic visual flourishes. I don't think Champagne will be released without a score, so catch it now.
     
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  4. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

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    I was thinking about what you wrote about Inspector Larrue, Matt. Hitchcock did make a point to show Larrue see Father Logan and Ruth outside the house of the murder. I suppose he felt that looked odd and ties them together. Making him suspicious of Father Logan. But I also was thinking how Hitchcock sometimes paints the police railroading the innocent. Like in Young and Innocent. But Malden’s character I felt wasn’t at that level due to the circumstances.
     
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  5. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

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    Thanks Jose, that’s interesting. Would have been nice to see Champagne come out on a Criterion blu ray. Perhaps as an added feature like was done on The Lodger.
     
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  6. Mark McSherry

    Mark McSherry Stunt Coordinator

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    Since Network UK never released Secret Agent on bluray (while releasing blus of Sabotage and Young and Innocent in 2015), Criterion may one day release a blu of Secret Agent. And throw in Champagne!

    Back in Criterion's laserdisc era, Sabotage, Secret Agent, and Young and Innocent were labelled #22, #23, and #24 on their respective cover spines.
     
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  7. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

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    Mark, a good quality release of Secret Agent would be very cool! Hope it happens someday.
     
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  8. bujaki

    bujaki Producer

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    I own LDs #22 and 23. Missing #24, Young and Innocent. I do own the Network BDs of Sabotage and Young and Innocent.
    Keep in mind that Champagne is owned by Studio Canal, not Janus.
     
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  9. bujaki

    bujaki Producer

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    Kino is releasing Champagne. I do hope they add a music track...
     
  10. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

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    Dial M for Murder.

    Dial M for Murder
    1954
    105 minutes Color 1.85:1, 3D and 2D
    Cast:
    Ray Milland - Tony Wendice
    Grace Kelly - Margot Mary Wendice
    Robert Cummings - Mark Halliday
    John Williams - Chief Inspector Hubbard
    Anthony Dawson - C A Swann / Captain Lesgate
    Leo Britt - The Storyteller
    Patrick Allen - Detective Pearson
    George Leigh - Detective Williams
    George Alderson - First Detective
    Robin Hughes - Police Sergeant
    Based on the play by- Frederick Knott
    Screenplay by- Frederick Knott
    Score by - Dimitri Tiomkin
    Directed by - Alfred Hitchcock
    Production Studio - Warner Brothers
    Viewed 8/24/19

    Warner Blu Ray, 2012 3D and 2D
    Also available in the Alfred Hitchcock The Signature Collection box set, Warner Brothers, 2004

    Synopsis

    Tony and Margot Wendice appears to be a happily married couple living in England. Tony is a retired tennis pro and making a go at a more traditional job which makes Margot happy. However before Tony retired, Margot wasn’t entirely happy and had an affair with another man, Mark Halliday who is a mystery murder writer. Tony discovers a secret letter between Margot and Mark and learns of the affair. He’s not happy to learn of this and decides to engineer the perfect crime and have Margot murdered and then he can inherit her fortune.

    Impressions

    I remember seeing Dial M For Murder as a child on TV on an afternoon broadcast of Dialing for Dollars on the local TV station. The o lay thing about the film that stuck to me at the time was the killer trying to kill Margot and her self defense. But as a little kid, that was all I knew about the movie.

    As a young teen, I rediscovered Dial M on TV late night on Creature Features and there was a discussion at the time it was being broadcast for the first time in 3D and you’d need the old fashioned glasses with the two color lens to see it. Or at least that was what I recalled that it was broadcast in 3D. Bob Wilkins, the host of Creature Features, discussed the placement of objects such as liquor bottles and lamps in the foreground to help with the impression of depth.

    In the 1990’s I was again discovering more Hitchcock and collected several titles on laserdisc, including Dial M as I recall. In 2004 I watched it a few more times on the Warner DVD set. For this viewing, I watched the 2012 Warner blu ray that includes the 3D version. So for the very first time at when the disc was released, I’ve been able to view the film in 3D. But at the time I first watched it on 3D, it wasn’t quite working for me. I think it was an issue with my eyes and my ability to fuse the two images each eye sees in my brain. It sort of worked. So I didn’t watch the 3D version that many times. In the time since, I’ve found that if I reposition the seating in my room and get closer to the screen, my eyes, when relaxed, can more easily fuse the image. So I’ve been watching many of the modern 3D titles with more success at seeing the 3D. When I watched Dial M for this project, I chose to try the 3D version again and to me surprise, I could really see it and feel more immersed in the effect. From the start, I could actually see the titles and credits float in front of the screen! I watched on my Panasonic plasma VT-30 65”. This set recently died and a tech came over to find it had a bad power supply that needed replacement. I am so glad I made the investment to repair the TV which still has a great image.

    On this viewing of Dial M for Murder in 3D, I was really seeing the depth so well. Being a stage bound film that primarily took place in Tony and Margot’s apartment, the effects to me seemed set up to three layers of depth, the foreground, the middle section which primarily included the actors and the background. There were some shots that even looked like the desk and Ray Milland standing by it were a separate element filmed and placed in the image of the apartment. There was a very effective shot where Ray Milland hands out the lock key to Swann and it pops out of the screen. I expected the see Grace Kelly’s had reaching for the scissors to pop more and maybe in the action, I missed it. I'll check it out again!

    Back to the film, as I said, this film has a long history of views for me from my childhood when I didn’t know what was going on to adulthood. As an adult, I could really appreciate the intricate plotting that Tony goes through to carefully plan the murder and set up Swann to do the deed. It was a wonderful Hitchcock twist that the plan doesn’t go as planned. As Mark says, he can plan the perfect murder on paper for his novels, but in real life, something happens to cause the plan to go wrong! That was the big take away for me this time, I had forgotten that dialogue or it went over my head. Tony was a really terrific villain as he was very likable, charming and sophisticated but at the same time, he was a really bad guy. It was also the first time viewing this film that I thought of Columbo. Maybe it occurred to me before, but the villain is a very Columbo like killer. ( Milland does make two Columbo films) John Williams as Inspector Hubbard was excellent as he figures out the truth. Even early on when the evidence was against Margot, he wasn’t totally convinced, but we didn’t see that until later in the film. Grace Kelly is great as the icy blond whose not so cool for Mark. But I thought it wasn’t until Rear Window when we really see a more fleshed out character for Kelly. She does great as Margot but she’s mainly a victim in the film. Bob Cummings comes off to me a bit snarky. He’s not very sympathetic and maybe that’s how he’s supposed to be. He’s doing what he can to save Margot. Of course Tony is civil to him, but I could see how they hate each other. I’d forgotten he is in this film after so recently seeing Saboteur. Back to Ray Milland’s Tony, he was a really smart and clever character as he manages to have a reason or explanation for the Inspector or Mark for any inconsistencies. Just like most Columbo killers.

    And I almost forgot about Anthony Dawson who I kept thinking I’d seen him somewhere else. And it wasn’t til I saw the extras that I realized he was in Dr. No! John Williams I thought was so terrific in this film. It’s in such contrast to the character he will later play in To Catch a Thief. Both characters that Williams played are with such great intelligence and humor.

    After seeing Strangers on a Train so recently, this is the first time I’ve made a connection to that film in Dial M for Murder as there’s a similar idea of having another person murder someone for you. While a very minor connection, it feels like each film builds on ideas of earlier films. ( I realize that Dial M for Murder is a straight adaptation to the stage play. It just happens to be a plotline that’s very Hitchcockian.). I thought the best parts of the film was the set up of Swann, Tony’s tricky plan as it unravels and he successfully makes it work for him, and the final section as Inspector Hubbard figures it out and puts a plan in action to reveal the killer. Overall this is a really good film and still one of my favorites, great story and plot, great suspense and great cast. Tony is ever cool and clever all the way to the end. And Grace Kelly is so memorable in her first of three Hitchcock films.

    And I was surprised that the 3D effects worked out so well on the blu ray for my eyes that don’t always see the effect. I could see an almost matte line around the actors and objects as if there was a margin or transition line between the foreground and background. I did see some cross talk or ghosting, but it wasn’t that distracting and was not often seen.

    hitchcockDial M.
     
  11. Osato

    Osato Producer

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    Anything with grace Kelly and Hitchcock is great imo.
    I love this one. Even if Hitchcock “phoned it in”...
     
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  12. Matt Hough

    Matt Hough Director
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    When the 3D boom hit once again in the 1980s, theaters began requesting some of the Golden Age titles to fill in spaces between new 3D movie releases. Dial 'M' for Murder was the first Golden Age title I was able to see in a theater, and I was shocked how much 3D increased the size of the playing area for the characters involved in this charade. On TV, Tony and Margot's apartment had seemed fairly small, but on the big screen and in 3D, it seemed MUCH bigger and more spacious, and I was very impressed with Hitchcock's deliberate placement of objects in the plane closest to the camera separating the audience from the actors with these objects.

    The movie is a very good adaptation of the stage play which had a healthy run (John Williams won a Tony for his stage performance) and was very popular in regional and community theaters.
     
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  13. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

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    Agreed Osato. :)
     
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  14. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

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    Matt, I’ve never seen Dial M for Murder in a theater. That’s an interesting observation that the 3D effect made the apartment seem bigger. I’ll have to compare with another viewing in 2D. There are shots such as when Grace Kelly goes into the bedroom and the camera is in the living room and you do feel all that depth and see it of course.

    I rewatched the scene in 3D when Margot grabs the scissors and I didn’t see it pop off the screen. Maybe the effect was not there.

    I saw that the play was very popular and it’s interesting that John Williams and Anthony Dawson reprise the roles for the film. It made me wonder if the film is much different in terms of dialogue and staging. Probably made it either easy or harder for them if the screenplay was very different from the stage.

    I doubt Hitchcock phoned it in, he must have been joking. :)
     
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  15. Osato

    Osato Producer

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    Hitchcock was joking. I like the quote though.
     
  16. Message #236 of 279 Aug 29, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
    Cineman

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    Matt, it must have been around that same time that I saw it in 3-D at the Tiffany Theater on Sunset Boulevard in L.A. You're right, it was a bit of a revelation, a delight to watch with an audience. For me, it was one of the rare times the 3-D process actually improved the story and plot.

    For the most part, the more "gimmick" laden 3-D movies lose their impact very soon after the initial wow effect (if any). In fact, that sometimes peaks during the opening credits! But with Dial M for Murder, Hitchcock used the effect to highlight certain plot points and key props along the way in the midst of what otherwise might seem a rather talkie movie; the blackmail letter, the sewing basket, the key, Margo's purse, her nylon stocking, the briefcase, to name a few.

    Regarding the scissors, I don't think Hitchcock staged and shot the scene with an idea to have the scissors "pop" out and come at us the way other 3-D movies show arrows, spears, boulders and such coming at us. That would have been introducing the kind of gimmick I believe Hitchcock was trying to avoid. Anyway, the scissors are laying flat on the desk and, when grabbed, are raised and pulled away from the audience rather than thrown or thrust toward them. Instead, the thing that is thrust toward us at that horrifying moment is Margo's hand as she is reaching out for something, anything, to save her life. At us. Yet we are helpless to do anything to save her life. Which, again, is the essence of Hitchcock's cinematic suspense philosophy.

    That is the heartbreaking flash of emotion he wanted us to feel. We want to shout at the screen or reach out to stop the attack, but are helpless to do so. Somewhat similar to what Tony felt while listening to the struggle, her murder, over the phone, helpless to respond to whatever natural impulse he may have felt at that instant to stop it.

    And I believe there was a practical reason for why Hitchcock did not want 3-D to be an important element of impact for that murder scene. He must have known the vast majority of audiences for the movie at the time and in the future would not be watching it in 3-D. So he did not want to make a likely passing gimmick crucial to its emotional impact, especially one so dependent on the projection process at the theater and requiring the audience to wear those glasses. As it turned out, very, very few people saw it in 3-D during its initial release. From what I've read, maybe it played in only 1 or 2 theaters in 3-D and even then for not very long. There have probably been more people seeing it in 3-D during those revival theater days and now on Blu-ray and home video than saw it that way in the mid-1950s.
     
  17. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

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    Rear_Window_film_poster.

    Rear Window

    1954
    112 minutes Color 1.66:1
    Cast:
    James Stewart - L B "Jeff" Jeffries
    Grace Kelly - Lisa Carol Fremont
    Wendell Corey - Lieutenant Thomas J Doyle
    Thelma Ritter - Stella
    Raymond Burr - Lars Thorwald
    Judith Evelyn - Miss Lonelyheart
    Ross Bagdasarian - Songwriter
    Georgine Darcy - Miss Torso
    Sara Berner - Woman on fire escape
    Frank Cady - Man on fire escape
    Jesslyn Fax - Miss Hearing Aid
    Rand Harper - Newlywed man
    Havis Davenport - Newlywed woman
    Irene Winston - Mrs Anna Thorwald
    Alan Lee - Landlord
    Anthony Warde - Detective
    Based on the short story- It Had To Be Murder. A 1942 short story by Cornell Woolrich
    Screenplay by- John Michael Hayes
    Score by - Franz Waxman
    Directed by - Alfred Hitchcock
    Production Studio - Paramount Studios
    Viewed 8/31/19

    Alfred Hitchcock The Masterpiece Collection Blu Ray box set, Universal, 2012
    Also available in the Alfred Hitchcock The Masterpiece Collection box set, Universal Studios, 2005

    Synopsis

    L.B. Jeffries or Jeff is a professional photographer working for a magazine who is stuck in a wheelchair in his Greenwich Village apartment. He has a broken leg caused by photographing an automobile race when one of the cars crashes and he’s in the way. With nothing to do, he spends his days looking out his apartment window at the courtyard below and the various neighbors apartments. He gives each one a nickname too. One night he thinks he hears a woman scream and then notices one apartment with a bedridden woman is missing. Jeff suspects murder and he soon enlists his girlfriend, Lisa Carol Fremont and nurse, Stella as they engage in speculation as to the woman’s whereabouts.

    Impressions

    This is Hitchcock’s examination of voyeurism. It’s not something I ever realized. I just sort of thought it was about a bored guy who was stuck in his apartment because of his broken leg and passed the time looking out the window as life passes by for everyone else. Until he notices something is not right. First he hears a woman scream and we hear the crash of glass breaking. Later Jeff begins to notice the woman is gone.

    Stewart.JPG

    I never realized until this viewing that the film opens with a long single unbroken shot where the camera looks out of the window of Jeff’s Greenwich Village apartment and out at the courtyard and the neighbors apartments who all live there, giving us a first look at them and then the camera pulls back into Jeff’s apartment and a shot of Jeff asleep in his wheelchair, leg in cast and then a look at the apartment and cameras, photos and magazines he’s shot photos for. It sets the scene up of who Jeff is and what he does. ( having seen Rope so recently probably made me more aware of the long single takes that Hitchcock continues to use in later films.)

    This film sucks you right in as we meet the neighbors from Jeff’s window, and then Stella the insurance agency nurse who makes a daily visit to Jeff’s apartment to look in on him and then his girlfriend Lisa Fremont who is a part of New York’s socialite world. The films starts off with setting up the relationship between Jeff and Lisa and I always found that Jeff was being such curmudgeon and making comments to undercut Lisa’s attempts to engage in taking the relationship to marriage. They do look like a mismatched pair.

    Then the fun begins as Jeff starts to wonder why one neighbor is making so many late night trips with his large jewelry sample case one night. Later he notices that the wife is gone and he sees him cleaning a knife and saw. He thinks he’s murdered his wife. Perhaps he’d cut her body up and taken the parts out in the case.

    The film builds on this as Jeff convinces Lisa and Stella of his suspicions and they get involved. And then Jeff tries to enlist his police friend to look into it as well and all he can come up with is enough circumstantial evidence to show the wife had gone out of town and no explicit proof otherwise. It’s a great romp as they dig further and one suspenseful episode builds to a great climax which I won’t get more detailed about.

    Another aspect that I always liked is that the character arc for Jeff and Lisa grows from Jeff not wanting to be married until he sees Lisa in action getting her hands dirty and then getting caught by the killer. He comes to realize she could change and he sees her with new eyes. She shows Jeff she’s capable. But still she likes what she likes in the end too.

    The Hitchcockian elements include; the limited setting of the apartment and courtyard, the icy blonde, voyerism, and the macguffin that might be buried in the flowerbed being the major bits. There’s other themes I’ve read that are examined in Rear Window but they never occurred to me. I was never too big on looking for any themes in Hitchcock films beyond the obvious. I can see that can be fun for some viewers and it’s another element to find in his films. I just sometimes wonder if it’s looking for something that is not there. So is there something more to Jeff having a broken leg? He certainly wasn’t able to drive the action, so others had to do it. It also made him unable to defend himself in the climax. I read that Hitchcock based the character of Jeff on a photojournalist Ingrid Bergman had an affair with and added the romantic aspect to the storyline.

    I was really looking forward to see Rear Window as I had not seen it in about 3 or 4 years. Each time I see something new. One thing I think I’d not really noticed was that Thorwald’s wife was sort of being a thorn to him. She is putting him down and they bicker.

    Another cool facet to this film is that there is no musical score. Franz Waxman wrote the titles and end tiles. I think he wrote the Lisa Theme that the struggling composer is seen trying to write. What we hear are the sounds of the neighbors, the street sounds, the kids playing, the rain, and the music from the party’s going on in the other apartments.

    Another marvel I find about this film is that large single set of the courtyard, the apartment and the extension to the street behind the courtyard and restaurant we see the characters walk out to but only seen from Jeff’s apartment. The film restoration really shows all the detailing that went into the set. It’s so well lit too to show daytime and late night.

    courtyard.JPG
    The Courtyard

    I’m kind of realizing is that this is one of 5 Hitchcock titles that Hitchcock’s estate had owned and was not seen publicly for decades after they were shown theatrically. It wasn’t until the early 1980’s that James C. Katz and Robert A. Harris were involved in a Hitchcock film restoration project as they found that these films were in great danger of being lost. It required a lengthy effort to restore the lost yellow layer in order to correct the film color. The films include, Rope, Rear Window, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much and Vertigo. I knew about this restoration because I remember getting the laser disc special edition of Vertigo where Katz and Harris is prominently showcased as doing the restoration. But what it made me wonder is if these films were out of circulation, when did I first see Rear Window?

    In the early 1970’s apparently this film was aired on ABC and without the proper rights, so that was the last public viewing, if what I read is correct on IMDB. I could have sworn I knew about this film or seen it as a kid. But maybe it wasn’t until the late 80’s and early 1990’s that I actually saw the film on laserdisc. It was one of several Universal MCA laserdiscs I had acquired. Since then I’ve seen the film in each iteration from single film DVDs from Universal in 2001 to the box set DVDs and the blu ray set. The blu ray set is the best I’ve ever seen it and heard it. So maybe it seems like I’ve seen it longer ago then is reality. The advent of home video made this film really accessible.

    I’m finding that I always like to learn and possibly buy items seen in films and TV shows that I like or are fascinated by that are actual items people could buy. I was curious about finding the lighter used in Strangers on a Train. I haven’t found that one yet. (Without the tennis rackets and initials of course). I found the cool Art Deco glasses that Ingrid Bergman uses in Notorious that she serves drinks to Cary Grant and the other guests at her house. But those are vintage and have leaded glass, so I didn’t buy them. On this viewing of Rear Window, I paid more attention to Jeff’s camera. I’d recently gotten more into photography and so I found his camera interesting. I learned from an internet search that it is a Exakta VX made in Germany in the early 1950’s. The long lens is a 400mm lens and according to the IMDB, it’s a 400mm Kilfitt.

    camera.JPG
    The camera Stewart uses but the Paramount prop department covered the logo with black.

    This film is so full of visuals. And the sound design is equally cool. It doesn’t get old and I always enjoy watching it. All the cast are terrific. James Stewart is Hitchcock’s favorite everyman. And I really disliked him early in the film for being so mean to Lisa. So it was nice to see him change. Grace Kelly plays the socialite so well. The part as written just for her so she could better bring it to screen. She’s a classic beauty and her first scene, the shot of her moving in to kiss Jeff looks so dreamy, so unreal in a sense. Thelma Ritter is great with her straight forward talk! Her one liners were terrific and she just blurts out what everyone is thinking.

    gracekelly.
     
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  18. Matt Hough

    Matt Hough Director
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    This is probably my favorite Hitchcock movie. I never tire of watching it. It is just so beautifully constructed. As Nelson says, it grabs you very early on and never lets go. You can't wait to see what happens next, and you're never let down. Unquestionably a Hitchcock masterpiece.
     
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  19. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

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    Agreed, Rear Window is one of Hitchcock’s masterpieces!

    Since it’s a holiday weekend and I have some time, I think I’ll keep the Grace Kelly momentum going and view To Catch a Thief next. It’s another one of my favorites.
     
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  20. Message #240 of 279 Sep 2, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2019
    Cineman

    Cineman Second Unit

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    Since virtually all of the neighbor scenarios illustrate and play out some troublesome aspect of a man-woman relationship or the lack of one, the struggles of marriage, the pain of loneliness, the pitfalls of dating, marital infidelity and worse, I love how Hitchcock treats the one apparently happy and drama-free family in the upper level between the song writer's apartment and the Thorwald apartment.

    It could be that my mention of it now draws a blank for many readers. lol. It would. No, I'm not talking about the couple with the dog. Hitchcock pans his camera past that other family's daily routine just as he does all the rest. But their apartment is colorless (literally!), the activities rather boring. The husband and wife appear to be perfectly healthy, happy, loving and attentive to each other and their young daughter. Therefore, they are of no real interest to Hitchcock, Stewart or us!

    Hey, we didn't buy a ticket or now buy a video in order to watch happy, well-adjusted families getting along swimmingly well with no drama, serious conflict or even murder involved! I have always thought Hitchcock's sly motive in including that happy family and prompting our dismissal of them was him adding the tasty element of anxiety to the suspense. In a way, "we" are partially responsible for the bad things that are about to happen to the characters. It wouldn't happen to them if we didn't want bad things to happen to them, if we didn't buy a ticket to make sure bad things happen to them.
     

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