Teach Me Receiver Technical Basics

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by MikeRP, Sep 18, 2002.

  1. MikeRP

    MikeRP Supporting Actor

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    Hi All!

    I have some basic questions I would be interested in starting a discussion on.

    One hears about the guts of a receiver so my questions are this:

    1. What does a transformer do?

    2. What type of power do speakers receive - AC or DC?

    3. If AC is it 120 V or is it a different voltage because of the transformer?

    4. If DC - what voltage?

    5. Is the amplifier the sum of the capacitors and transformers or is it a seperate part in the receiver?

    6. Does anyone have a simplified flow chart of what really happens inside the receiver or amplifier?

    7. What's a heat sink and what is it dispering the heat generated by?

    I know these are probably stupid questions - but I'm I just have to ask!

    Thanks for any response.

    Mike
     
  2. Rommel_L

    Rommel_L Second Unit

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    Hmmm,
    1. Check this site out.
    2. DC
    3. If this is in reference to question 2, then this question is irrelevant.
    4. If this is in reference to question 2, then it depends on the level of the volume control.
    5. It is more like the amplifier is one of the sections inside the receiver. An amplifier circuit consists (not a sum) of resistors, capacitors, inductors, transistors and other components.
    6. No, I don't have a chart.
    7. Check this site out. It's primarily used to dissipate heat caused by the transistors.
    Cheers,
    -RL-
     
  3. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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  4. MikeRP

    MikeRP Supporting Actor

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    RL:

    Thanks for the site - I'll use it frequently.

     
  5. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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  6. MikeRP

    MikeRP Supporting Actor

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    Hey Greg - keep teaching me about tha tlong quote....

    Great Link!

    I got lots of reading to do.....

    Thanks Mike
     
  7. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    A receiver is an amplifier, a preamp, a tuner, & a decoder all rolled up into one unit.
    Amplifier: Something that amplifies an existing waveform.
    Preamp: Used for volume control, input switching, & level amplification. Some devices aren't powerful enough to directly drive an amplifier input (e.g. a microphone) so they need to be amplified before they are sent to the power amp.
    Tuner: Section that pulls in radio stations. Considered to be electrically noisy, most audiophiles prefer to not have these in the same box as their processor or amplification.
    Decoder:Takes a digital encoded bitstream and converts it into analog information. Primarily used for PCM (CD), DD, & DTS decoding. Some companies have their own decoding algorithms (Logic 7, etc.)
    Not sure if this is what you wanted elaborated... could you repeat the question?
     
  8. MikeRP

    MikeRP Supporting Actor

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    Hey Greg:

    I think I went Brain dead up above somewhere!

    But the links that were given above have a lot of information in them that hopefully will help me understand the basics.

     
  9. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    OK, so you're asking why 6x123 > 710? I would guess that Pioneer is conservatively estimating their power supply. There is no way that the continuous power draw of the amp could be greater than the output of the power supply. In fact, it would have to be lower (there are losses due to heat, etc.). However, it is possible to get temporary peaks greater than the power supply's output... the storage caps inside the amp will supply this quick burst of power.
     
  10. MikeRP

    MikeRP Supporting Actor

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    Greg:

    That's basically it. I've seen that discussion format before and I wanted to find a real good reason why the Power Supply Rating is not a good indication of the real Max Cont AMP rating - all channels driven.

    Pioneer in addition to conservatively rating their Power Supply could be reporting avg power consumption not the max capability of the Power Supply.

    What do you think? Anyway the links above provide some good reading on receiver design.

    I think John Garcia is right. Just listen to it and if you like it - then be satisfied (paraphrased!)

    Thanks

    Mike
     
  11. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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  12. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  13. MikeRP

    MikeRP Supporting Actor

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    Good Post Saurav:

    Thanks for the input. I'm not sure this is the question I want to ask but what do you look for (if anything) in the manufacurers specs that gives you comfort that your purchasing the right amp for your needs.

    "So, in my opinion - figure out the volume you normally listen at, then see how much power that translates to (this depends on your speaker's sensitivity and your room size and other things). That gives you your average power requirements."

    In others words- any way to put some real world numbers to the statement you made to get say some maybe empirical rules on amp selection.

    This may be a really screwed up question!

    Mike
     
  14. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  15. MikeRP

    MikeRP Supporting Actor

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    Saurav:

    Thanks! Good explanation - I'm going to Radio Shack and get an SPL meter.

    So now only one more question (maybe). Taking your example into account as it is....How do we apply it to a home theater situation. Do I pick my say my normal listening position and take these reading say in 5 channel stereo mode with a test disk? For instance, on my 45TX I put the calibration mic halfway between 2 overstuffed chairs that are the normal listening positions.

    Or do I try to do each speaker individually sitting approx. 6 feet from each one getting readings to try to estimate Power Requirements from each speaker individually?


    I'm assuming the latter. Greg authored the following quote.

     
  16. Larry B

    Larry B Screenwriter

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    Greg:

     
  17. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  18. Larry B

    Larry B Screenwriter

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    Saurav:

     
  19. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  20. Larry B

    Larry B Screenwriter

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    Saurav:

     

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