Teac Phono to CD Recorder need some input.

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Jerome Grate, Apr 15, 2005.

  1. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

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    A friend showed me this, and it looks like something I would get since I have over 1,000 albums. Anyway if anyone have any personal or other input would be helpful. Teac
     
  2. John S

    John S Producer

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    Price seem reasonable enough, convienience seems great.

    I don't think you can afford to wait much longer. Get those on Optical Media as soon as possible.
     
  3. jacob_A

    jacob_A Auditioning

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    Sounds good on a convenience level.
    It would also depend on the condition of your collection.
    Straight to CD may inhibit any kind of clean-up or restoration you would want to perform on the audio tracks.
    Even a fresh brand new record will need to be re-equalized when transfered to CD (or any digital format).
    I use my Pioneer DV-220 recorder to record my vinyl. Then I extract the audio from the DVD files then import them to Nero's wave editor for any clean-up, then the finished files can then be put on CD or kept as mp-3's
     
  4. John S

    John S Producer

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    I used to do collections for people when I operated my recording studio.

    More people than not, wanted exact duplication with all flaws duplicated as well interesting enough.
     
  5. Marvin

    Marvin Screenwriter

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    Do you already have a turntable? If so, you could probably get a better CD recorder for less. Not that I've ever owned that unit but my first CD player was a TEAC and it didn't last that long.

    I use this for a CD recorder/player:
    http://www.crutchfield.com/S-MhAH4Jn...0&I=158RCDW500
     
  6. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    If you have a turntable you can get a good Pioneer CD recorder off eBay for $150 or less. If I recall from my research a couple of years ago when I was shopping for one, the PDR-509 and 555 were considered the best of they made.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  7. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

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    Unfortunately the turntables I had(2) I lend them to my nephew and one is broken and the other.., well.., don't know where he sent it. Anyway, I do have a pretty good cd recorder for digital audio and if I got one of the turntables back, I would need some type of pre-amp or transport for it to play through the cd recorder. I think I better contact my nephew to see what condition it's in. Any idea on what I should get in reference to having the turntable play through the cd recorder?
     
  8. Marvin

    Marvin Screenwriter

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    I take it your receiver doesn't have a phono pre-amp. If so, there are some turntables with a built-in pre-amp e.g. http://www.crutchfield.com/S-X7dW9rb...arch=turntable

    and others. I don't much about this turntable but I'd bet it's better than the one in that TEAC unit.

    Another alternative would be to get a turntable without a built-in pre-amp (Technics models seem popular around here)and buy a separate phono pre-amp. Radio Shack sells an inexpensive one, I believe.

    It seems to me that as long as you have a CD recorder already, buying a new turntable and a pre-amp (if it's not built in to the turntable) would make more sense and be cheaper than spending 399 for the TEAC unit.
     
  9. LanceJ

    LanceJ Producer

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    [​IMG]

    If you're thinking about the RIAA equalization curve, that is automatically accomplished in the phono preamp section.

    Jerome: Compared to digital, analog music formats are much more dependent on the "you get what you pay for" concept. A $100 turntable with a cartridge & built-in preamp won't sound nearly as good as a basic entry-level turntable (like mine [​IMG], a Technics SL-BD22) with a decent cartridge in the $60 range (for example Shure, Audio-Technica, or Ortofon) matched up with a decent phono preamp. The preamp could be in a receiver, or a separate one but I don't have any personal experience with those (a couple years ago a lot of audiophiles were raving over a $25 battery powered model from Radio Shack).

    The reason I mention all this is because if you want to spend all that time archiving a thousand LPs to the CD-R format, I personally would want to use some decent playback equipment to do so.

    BTW: I have noticed WAY more complaints about PC-based burners making "coasters" and having other problems than standalone burners--in fact, I honestly can't remember the last time I read where anyone said their standalone made a bad copy.
     
  10. Jim Rakowiecki

    Jim Rakowiecki Stunt Coordinator

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    I'd go with a stand alone burner and a decent turntable as suggested above. It still leaves the option of washing it in some kind of clean up software and reburning if you want.
    Check out the Lite-on DVD recorders they also burn CD's. I know they are reasonably priced and a lot lot of people here have had some good things to say about them and one can be had for less than $200.00.
     

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