Taking the sonosub plunge! Take two!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Patrick Sun, Jul 3, 2000.

  1. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1999
    Messages:
    38,717
    Likes Received:
    463
    My earlier thread on this topic got eaten up by the HTF Borg collective somehow, so below is a hastily pasted together bits and pieces of my journey into the world of DIY sonosubs:
    June 25, 2000
    Okay, I got tired of not having any decent power tools, so after a dose of Home Improvement's Tool Time, I went to Home Depot and came home with a Skil Plunge Router (which I may not use depending on whether I want the drivers recessed), Ryobi 5" sander, Black-n-Decker Power Drill (4.5A, corded - didn't want to run out of power, ya know), and Black-n-Decker Jigsaw (with easy blade attachment contraption). That was about $185 of tools, but it'll be worth it since it'll also me to build some flexy racks down the road too, and maybe full-range speakers again.
    Now I need to get some 3/4" MDF, and the sonotube (24" diameter), some 8" PVC pipe, a dual speaker binding post plate, and some misc. bits and pieces, different types of coarseness for the sand paper, some glue, liquid nails. Then the fun begins!
    I think I will go with a dual 12" Shiva water heater sonosub 24" wide, 8" port - tuned to 18-19Hz, 12 ft^3, one driver on top, one on the bottom.
    ---------------
    June 26, 2000
    Last night, after checking out one Home Depot and finding no 3/4" MDF at all, I went to another one 5 miles away. I lucked up and was able to I picked up 2 sheets of 3/4" MDF (24"x49") for the endcaps, the bonus being they were pre-cut and fit in my lil' Honda Civic with the rear seatback folded down. I also picked up 2 sheets of 1/4" plywood (24"x24") to be used so that the t-nuts have something to hold on to for the inner endcap.
    Here's a question, I also bought 48" of Quikrete tube (it's like sonotube but a lil' thinner). I will cut it down to around 27" for use in the sonosub. I found one which had the closest inner diameter of 8" that I was looking for to use as the port.
    ----------------
    June 27, 2000
    Here's a couple of raw material shots:
    Photo 1
    Photo 2
    Photo 3
    The other Shiva driver is currently in use in another sub enclousure.
    Like I said, I needed to start buying some power tools, so this is a good opportunity to "prove" them into my daily budget of life.
    If I can get a truck, I will bring home 2 6 foot sections of 24" sonotube tomorrow morning. That will be the final piece of the puzzle, all that's left is the elbow grease.
    I will buy the cloth material covering up the sides of the sonosub later, but I'm thinking of doing it up in a lighter hunter green color.
    ------------------
    June 28, 2000
    I got my buddy to bring home the two 6 foot long sonotubes for me. Yeah!
    Well, finally got the endcaps done and the circular cutouts too:
    Photo 4 - me before cutting the stuff.
    Photo 5 - Router at work.
    Photo 6 - make sure the endcap would fit by cutting a 3-4" piece of sonotube off and use it for the "fit" of the endcap.
    Photo 7 - holes for the parts to be cut into the endcap.
    Photo 8 - Ta da! Holes cut out for the driver/port/terminal cup.
    Photo 9 - this is me after all that cutting up of MDF.
    ------------------
    PatCave ; HT Pix ; HT Gear ; Pat's DVDs ; Pat's LDs
     
  2. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 1999
    Messages:
    2,282
    Likes Received:
    0
    Good work Pat. This was certainly the w/e to build sonatube subs.
    We a did the cosmetic finishing to Joey's tube and made an operational (but not yet pretty) sub for Dan H. Pictures of both these projects should follow later in the week.
     
  3. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1999
    Messages:
    38,717
    Likes Received:
    463
    Thanks, ThomasW! Great minds schedule alike. [​IMG]
    July 3, 2000 update:
    Now 5 days later (after 4 days of Dragon Con), I'm ready to start back on the sonosub.
    I went out and bought two 2 square yards of this hunter green cloth with a wood grain pattern from Wal-Mart and some velcro strips, which I plan on using to attach the cloth to the sonosub's exterior.
    Today I cut my sonotube to the final height (including the endcap depths). Cutting a cylindrical object with a 2 foot diameter very square/straight and perpendiculat to inner axis isn't as easy as it looks. Based on an idea from ThomasW (when he and J6P did a sonosub in a day), here's what I did:
    Photo 10 - I taped enough typing paper to make a 7 foot long banner.
    Photo 11 - I measured from the bottom of the tube (where it had already been machine cut at the factory) 54.5" in height, and made about 8-10 marks around the tube, and then I taped the banner at the marks so that I'd have what I needed to cut away from the rest of the tube.
    Photo 12 - then I used a thick black magic marker and drew a line at the border of the white banner. This lets me know where to make the cut.
    Photo 13 - then I used a drill to drill a slit so that I could use a jigsaw to cut down the black line. As you can see, I now have the tube cut to me desired height.
    If you use a jigsaw, you'll notice that there is a lot of ragged paperfiber edges on the cut. I used a pair of scissors to trim away the ragged edges. Later on, I'll use a sander to smooth out the edges so it'll be flush with the endcaps.
    I have a 48 inch section of quikrete tube that I'm using for my port (8 inch diameter), and needed only 24 inches of the tube, so I used the same principles above and cut the port down to size:
    Photo 14 - wrapped a banner at the right height.
    Photo 15 - drew the black cut line.
    Photo 16 - now I have 2 ports roughly the same height.
    Then I preceded to start painting the sonotube with black spraypaint:
    Photo 17 - started the process.
    Photo 18 - finished painting.
    Next I wanted to drill the holes for the screws for the Shiva driver. You need to prop up the endcap so that you can put in the driver and mark where the screw holes should be drilled through the endcap.
    Photo 19 - I used 3 small buy.com DVD shipping boxes to prop up the endcap.
    Photo 20 - I drop in the Shiva driver and mark the holes by drill a small pilot hole in all 8 holes.
    Since I'm using 10-24 machine screws and t-nuts, I have to drill progressively larger holes until I get the right size so the screw fit into the hole nice and snug. This take longer than you think it would. But you persevere and you get them drilled.
    Next, you have to make sure the t-nuts will fit when you hammer them into the insides of the endcap screw holes, so you have to drill a slightly larger hole on the inner side of the endcap. Be careful not to drill more than 0.5 to 1 inch in depth when making this slightly larger hole for the t-nuts.
    Photo 21 - since some people have never seen a t-nut, here it is with a sloted bolt screwed into it.
    Photo 22 - here are the 2 parts separated.
    Photo 23 - checking for fit of hole drilled for the t-nut.
    Photo 24 - since this is DIY, I decided I wanted some extra bonding power for the t-nut, besides just having the pointed ends dig into plywood, I put a bit of liquid nails near the hole for extra adhesion.
    Photo 25 - t-nut put into place, ready to be hammered into the plywood (either plywood or OSB can be used as it's a softer wood that won't wear away like MDF would if you tried relying on the pointed ends to provide the adhesion for the t-nuts.)
    Photo 26 - t-nut hammered into place.
    Photo 27 - Q.E.D.
    Photo 28 - since this is DIY, I went a bit nutty, and applied more liquid nails all around the t-nut after it's been nailed into the wood because I wanted to minimize air-leaks.
    Photo 29 - fininshed all 8 t-nuts for this endcap, and did the same for the other endcap. The second one always goes by quicker because you know what you are doing, and know how you want it done.
    At this point, the endcaps can be painted.
    Photo 30 - unpainted endcap for now...
    Photo 31 - paint job almost done...
    Photo 32 - paint job finished.
    Photo 33 - now both endcaps are done for now.
    Once I pop in endcaps tomorrow, and caulk it on the insides and the outside, I'll have to sand the edges flush, and then do some touch up painting for both endcaps.
    Tomorrow's schedule of events:
    1. I forgot to drill holes for the 3 legs I bought for the sonosub. Doh!
    2. Glue in the bottom endcap (also tack/nail it on the sides) and caulk it.
    3. Sand the endcap and tube edges flush with one another.
    4. Put in the 2 vertical bracing 2x2's, using liquid nails.
    5. I'm tempted to go the extra step and create 2 circular braces 1 inch thick for some additional bracing of the tube - but maybe I'll do that on another sub.
    6. Put in the terminal cup, and do the wiring for both drivers.
    7. Pop on the top endcap (glue/tack/caulk/sand it) and make sure it's also flush with the top edge of the tube.
    8. Attach the legs to the bottom endcap.
    9. Wire up the bottom Shiva driver and screw it into the bottom endcap.
    10. Wire up the top Shiva driver and screw it into the top endcap.
    11. Drag it into the HT, hook up it and have a cool drink and start up Jurassic Park on dts LD!
    12. Dress it up with the fabric and velcro.
    ------------------
    PatCave ; HT Pix ; HT Gear ; Pat's DVDs ; Pat's LDs
     
  4. Ty Zucker

    Ty Zucker Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 1999
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    0
    Looks great so far!
    I've been wanting to build one of these puppies for a while now, but I've got another month or two to go before I've got the spare cash saved. [​IMG] (My wife would kill me if I built one of these before we buy the new refrigerator we've talked about getting)
    Next time you want to cut sonotube, you might want to try and find a friend or neighbor with a tablesaw. It should be much easier to cut the tube to length and to get a straight cut all the way around.
    ------------------
     
  5. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 7, 1999
    Messages:
    2,921
    Likes Received:
    1
    Looks great so far Patrick!
    Which Skil model did you get? I was looking today and saw a variable speed plunge router.......Maybe the same ?
    How did you cut almost 2" of MDF and plywood?? Is there a bit I can buy??
    I see you got a cirle jig...I guess you got that at HD too??
    Don't forget MORE PICTURES!!
    Thanks
    Brent L
    Nice to see that you squeezed your nose piece [​IMG]
     
  6. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1999
    Messages:
    38,717
    Likes Received:
    463
    Brentl, the plunge router model number was a Skil 1823, it did not have variable speeds, just an on/off switch.
    I had to route from the top and the bottom to cut through almost 2 inches of wood (just drill the pilot hole for the circle jig all the way through the wood). I got the circle jig (multi-purpose router guide) from Sears - HD did not have any sort of circle jig in stock at the time I needed it).
    I used the same recommended router bit from www.joey6p.com and J6P/ThomasW's DIY sealed sonosub, something like a 1/4" upcut, spiral twist bit.
    I recommend buying a $30-$40 power sander, mucho nice for finishing off the look. It's better than elbow grease.
    ------------------
    PatCave ; HT Pix ; HT Gear ; Pat's DVDs ; Pat's LDs
     
  7. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 7, 1999
    Messages:
    2,921
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'm sure the Router was crying afterwards.....that be alot of MDF.
    Thanks for the info.
    Brent L
    ------------------
    Can you dig it?
     
  8. Ty Zucker

    Ty Zucker Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 1999
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    0
    Warning!
    Do NOT route huge amounts of wood off in a single pass. Take multiple cuts and lower the bit each time. It's safer, will provide a cleaner edge, and is easier on your tool.
    ------------------
     
  9. Poul

    Poul Auditioning

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 1999
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I found that Robozip's bit works better in router than router's bit. It's also smaller (1/8") so it cuts much less MDF and works less hard.
    ------------------
    The reality is poor imitation of art.
     
  10. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 1999
    Messages:
    2,282
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a RotoZip tool and the bits do work in a router. The Rotozip bits work well in 3/4" material. But my experience is that they overheat and burn up in multiple laminated endcaps.
    The 1/4" solid carbide, spiral twist, up-cut bits, made by Oldham Viper, sold at Home Depot for $18 have NO PEERS when it comes to cutting through THICKLY laminated MDF.
     
  11. Jason J

    Jason J Auditioning

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2000
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    >>>Photo 21 - since some people have never seen a t-nut, here it is with a sloted bolt screwed into it.
     
  12. Jason J

    Jason J Auditioning

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2000
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    >>>The 1/4" solid carbide, spiral twist, up-cut bits, made by Oldham Viper, sold at Home Depot for $18 have NO PEERS when it comes to cutting through THICKLY laminated MDF.
     
  13. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1999
    Messages:
    38,717
    Likes Received:
    463
  14. Julian Data

    Julian Data Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 1999
    Messages:
    408
    Likes Received:
    0
    Very nice job so far Patrick! [​IMG]
     
  15. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1999
    Messages:
    38,717
    Likes Received:
    463
    Jason, I paid $21 for the router bit that ThomasW recommends, and it did the job for me very well. Don't skimp on decent tools, it'll make life a lot easier.
    I did do multiple passes when I was routing the circles, I'd start with half an inch, and then go to one inch, and then 1.5 inches. Then I'd turn the wood upside down and (remember to drill the circle router guide 1/8" pilot hole all the way through the wood) and start routing 1/2 inch in depth, and that should be good enough to cut through the wood by now. (I used 2 pieces of 3/4" MDF and 1/4" plywood, so I was okay when I went 1.5" deep on the front side, and then routed through the plywood on the other side. MDF is easily cut with the 1/4" spiral upcut router bit, it's the plywood that gives it some trouble (just because of the way plywood's grain can lay at any point of a circle).
    For WinISD, if you have 2 Shivas, just double the Vas number from 144 to 288 in the driver parameters (I created a separate driver with that one change in the Vas for the dual-Shiva setup, and used that when I was modelling for a specific tune). Then, just put in 2 drivers in WinISD, and tell it what size port diameter, and what desired tuning frequency you want, and you'll get your port length. The frequency response is a lot smoother with the dual-Shiva setup (no hump near the tuning frequency with the single-Shiva setup).
    ------------------
    PatCave ; HT Pix ; HT Gear ; Pat's DVDs ; Pat's LDs
     
  16. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1999
    Messages:
    38,717
    Likes Received:
    463
    If anyone is reading, should I align my top Shiva driver right on top of the bottom driver when I pop in the top endcap, or should I locate the top driver over the port's position on the bottom endcap? I have seen Mike Knapp's plan where he put the drivers in line with one another. Just wondering before I put in the finishing touches tomorrow night.
    ------------------
    PatCave ; HT Pix ; HT Gear ; Pat's DVDs ; Pat's LDs
     
  17. David A. Frattaroli

    David A. Frattaroli Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 10, 1999
    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thomas, I agree on the Oldham Viper bits! I currently have two that I use on an old but mint Rockwell router. I've used that combination with a Jasper Audio circle jig to cut 4 holes for 12" Celestion drivers. I'm rebuilding the front of a 4x12 guitar cabinet and those bits cut hard and fast.
     
  18. Ty Zucker

    Ty Zucker Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 1999
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey, $18 is cheap for a decent router bit. ;-P I've got a few that are in the $30-40 range. Yikes! Seriously though, spiral bits are definitely the way to go for straight cut work. I think I saw someone mention it in one of these Sonosub threads, but it bears repeating. If you have or buy a roundover bit and knock the edge off one face of the endcaps, it's much easier to get the sucker fit inside the tube.
    ------------------
     
  19. Joel Noble

    Joel Noble Extra

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 1999
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    ThomasW is being -slightly- misleading when he says "I have X tool" or "I have Y router bit."
    It would be more complete for him to say "I have every tool ever known to mankind, and I know how and when to use them."
    Ok, maybe not. But his collection is MIGHTY impressive.
    j
    ------------------
     
  20. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 1999
    Messages:
    2,282
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi guys,
    Thanks Joel [​IMG]
    I don't know about the price difference regarding the router bits. The actual price I pay in the Denver area Home Depot stores is $16.99. This is about 1/2 the price for these bits from some of the hardcore woodworking stores.
    The answer to the "is this worth it?" is most definitely YES!!
    Occasionally if I'm in a hurry and need to laminate up some material before routing it, I use an air nailer with 1 1/4" wire brads to "tack" the pieces together while the glue dries. I don't bother to remove them if they are in the way of the router bit because it just mows them down . Now I don't recommend this (you know "closed road course professional driver") as a standard practice because it does dull the bits faster, but the brads are no problem for these solid carbide bits.
    Pat
    You can put the driver anywhere you want, it really doesn't matter. Some think that the speaker shouldn't fire directally into the back of a port, but the jury is still out on this one.
     

Share This Page