Tactile Transducers blown? **HELP**

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike_Ped, Nov 22, 2001.

  1. Mike_Ped

    Mike_Ped Second Unit

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    My friend and I installed his new tactile transducers he had been building while I worked on my Sonosub. Well, after about 5 minutes of flawless usage (these things are awesome, everyone should have some!), they stopped shaking. After playing with the settings for about 5 minutes, we decided to test the wire connection on another speaker. It worked. So, we came to the conclusion that something must be wrong with the speaker itself. What does a blown speaker look like? We checked the wires on the speaker itself, and they were fine. Any help would be great!

    Mike

    BTW - They were 80watt, 4 ohm car speakers.
     
  2. Mike_Ped

    Mike_Ped Second Unit

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    Anyone? PPPLLEEEAASSSEEE help...you have no idea how much work these things took....SO MUCH EPOXY!!! ....and only 5 minutes of life!

    mike
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Well, I’m confused. We start out with “tactile transducers” and end up with “4-ohm car speakers. . . ??"

    In any event the way to check is the same: Put an ohm meter across the positive and negative terminals. If there is no reading, it is dead.

    Edit: I noticed the second post after I put mine up:

    Are you saying you made tactile transducers out of regular speakers by embalming them in epoxy? If so, it is no wonder they had a short life. The cone movement of a speaker does more than transmit sound waves. The mechanical motion also serves to cool the voice coil. If whatever it was you did prevented or impaired cone movement, the sudden death was assured. The voice coil heated up and fried.

    You can probably buy some real tactile transducers for less than the price of the dead speakers and all that epoxy.

    Regards,

    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Bill Catherall

    Bill Catherall Screenwriter

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    FYI Wayne - When building TTs from speakers you cut the cone out (I hope that's what you did Mike). The dust cap gets epoxied up so it can take the stress of driving the weight that gets attached to it. So there is still mechanical movement. But you could be onto something. Depending on how they were built, the dust cap could have been prevented from moving enough to keep the voice coil cool. I built a pair of these and have been using them flawlessly for 2 years.

    Mike - Use Wayne's method for checking the voice coil. It's possible that you may have overdriven them and burned out the voice coil. How much power is the receiver you were using rated for at 4 ohms? Did you have things turned up pretty high? Were these speakers broken in before they were modified into TTs? If they were never broken in properly and you cranked them up to high volumes with a 200 watt @ 4 ohm amplifier, then I'm not surprised they fried.

    Were they built properly (cone cut out, no mechanical interference in the voice coil/magnet, weight attached to metal strap across the basket, metal strap attached securely to dust cap)? How much weight was put on it? How thick is the strap? How big is the woofer?
     
  5. Mike_Ped

    Mike_Ped Second Unit

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    Welp, we have that Ohm meter, but have yet to test it. I'll let you guys know. Thanx for the suggestions.

    Mike
     
  6. Mike_Ped

    Mike_Ped Second Unit

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    To answer yer questions Bill...
    I actually used the design you illustrated in a thread I posted a while back. We cut the cone off, leaving the dust cap. Then from there we built up thin layers of epoxy, then washers and the bolt. There was a metal strip extending across the top and it was attached VERy securly (I have a blister to prove it! [​IMG] ) There was about 2 pounds of metal BB's in a sock wrapped in duct tape and zip tied to the metal strip securly.
    The receiver is rated at 60 watts (but we're still unsure at what ohm that is rated - its and old receiver).
    We probably blew the speakers, they were small car speakers that I had laying around and my friend had been talking about making tactile transducers for a long time - so...I donated them for the project to fianlly get underway. It was a fun learning experience and I think we'll end up building more. While I probably can buy some real tactile's for about the same cost it is to build them, it was fun finally being able to BUILD part of the HT. I can actually say...."Hey, I BUILT those" ...instead of "Hey, I BOUGHT those..."
    Anyway, thanx again guys!
    Mike
     
  7. Bill Catherall

    Bill Catherall Screenwriter

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    Mike - If you get around to building these again then I'd get a cheap pair of 10" woofers. I've seen "Thump" woofers for about $10 on the internet and sometimes at Fry's Electronics. Also, next time it might be a good idea to save cutting out the cone for last. Just remove enough of it and the rubber gasket on the basket to attach the strap. Then remove the rest of the gasket and the cone before you attach the weight. This order of assembly will ensure the voice coil remains centered. If the voice coil isn't centered then it will not move correctly and could burn out.

    Another detail to watch for during assembly is to make sure you don't push the dustcap down or lift it up beyond it's natural resting position. If you notice, before you attach the strap to it, the dustcap can be lifted or pushed up and down. When you attach the strap you need to make sure it stays in its natural position.

    Then when playing them you need to make sure you are only sending the low frequencies. You can use the subwoofer pre-out of the receiver for this. I assume you know that, but I'm mentioning it just in case you didn't.
     
  8. Mike_Ped

    Mike_Ped Second Unit

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    Yeah, I'm probably going to get some of those woofers you spoke of. I'm not to far from Fry's Electronics in Woodland Hills, CA (or is it Westlake....I can never remember). So...I'll keep in mind not to cut away that dust cap. And thanx for the info about the sensitivity of that dust cap. We did indeed notice how it went up and down...maybe a little too much! Thanx again

    Mike
     

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