Switching 4:3 to 16:9 in video editing

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by PhilipW, Sep 13, 2002.

  1. PhilipW

    PhilipW Second Unit

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    Need a little help.

    I have a Sony Vaio and have started to edit some of my home videos. They were shot in 4:3 and I would like to letterbox them for my 16:9 Pioneer.

    I have Premiere LE and the other Sony software. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Let me get this straight

    You want to crop your 4:3 video to 16:9, and then perform the squish so they'll display correctly on your 16:9 set?

    why not just use your 16:9 TV's zoom modes to do it? I don't think Premiere LE can really handle what you want to do.

    Personally, I use Adobe After Effects for this sort of thing, and it's about 100x easier.
     
  3. PhilipW

    PhilipW Second Unit

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    Jeff,
    No I'm not worried about the squish. I'm not trying to act like an anamorphic disc. I just want to "Letterbox" them manually.
    From scene to scene, I basically want to add black bars to the top and bottom of the screen and then use the zoom on the TV. I realize I could have shot with the Sony 16:9 mode now, but at the time I was in my "uninformed" years.
    After all I'm the director and want to cut the top and bottoms off[​IMG]
     
  4. Matt Broeska

    Matt Broeska Stunt Coordinator

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    well assuming it's 720x486, you'll first want to crop it to 720x405 then resize it again to 720x486, which in essense would give you the 16:9 image you want. alternatively, you could resize it first to 640x480 (the square pixel version of 720x486), crop to 640x360 then resize again to 640x480 or 720x486. either would yeild the same result.
     
  5. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Phillip,

    What Jeff suggested still stands: why not leave the video 4:3 and use the TV's zoom to crop off the top and bottom. I don't see the appeal of spending all the extra time adding black bars, when the zoom mode on the set will crop them off anyway.

    Basically, black bars or not, if you zoom in on the 16:9 set, that picture area will not be seen. You could spend hours re-rendering the video with mattes, but I don't see the appeal.

    -V
     
  6. PhilipW

    PhilipW Second Unit

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    Example. I had 3 cameras at my wedding. The closest was on a stationary tripod. The guy running the cameras used my dad 5'6" to frame the view. Well I'm 6'0" and the top of my head is at the top of the screen while we have a bunch of carpet at the bottom. So if I just zoom in on the 16:9 we'll lose my head. Now I may not be much to look at but I was the groom.
     
  7. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Well, if you want to matte and adjust the framing, you will need Adobe After Effects. I think Premiere will "matte" as one of it's video effects, although I don't know if LE does this- but even if it does- it will only matte top and bottom equally (the same as your zoom function on your TV).

    So, you will need a real pro-sumer level video application like After Effects ($400ish), and a few hours of spare time to reframe all the shots. I don't know of any other application that allows you to matte and reposition behand the mattes other than after effects. Although, maybe someone here knows something.

    -Vince
     
  8. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    Often you can get good results by keeping the top 360 scanlines and centering that on black (creating bars 60 scanlines each on top and bottom). This preserves the headroom of the original shot which is usually more important than preserving the bottom. Surely Premiere can do that? But sometimes you need to "Tilt & Scan". After Effects can do that easily.
     
  9. PhilipW

    PhilipW Second Unit

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    Thanks for the responses. I don't have weekend access to the internet, so I haven't been ignoring the thread. I figured After Effects would be the solution however, since I just bought this computer the WAF is extremely low right now.[​IMG]
    I'm think it's going to have to stay 4:3.
    Wayne I'll definitely look into that.
    Thanks for the help everyone.
     

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