switched outlet

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Matthew BW, Aug 8, 2003.

  1. Matthew BW

    Matthew BW Stunt Coordinator

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    Does the outlet on the back of the receiver use any power from the receiver or is it just a pass thru. I want to plug a fan into it that comes on with the receiver but I do not want to draw power from the receiver. Thanks
     
  2. David Preston

    David Preston Supporting Actor

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    I have a question about your fan what kind are you using? I would think that it wouldn't take any power away from the receiver. I am looking for a small fan I can do the same thing with. Only thing is all the fans that use wall plugs are to big. I want a small fan.
     
  3. Matthew BW

    Matthew BW Stunt Coordinator

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    I am probably going to use a small clip on type fan than when it is on slow is very quiet.
     
  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Matthew,

     
  5. Matthew BW

    Matthew BW Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks
     
  6. MikeTrotter

    MikeTrotter Agent

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    Plugging a fan into a receiver outlet is a bad idea.
     
  7. Mark Shannon

    Mark Shannon Screenwriter

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    I don't see why it's a bad idea... It's not drawing enouhg power to cause a fuse to blow or something.

    This is what I've done. I have two 12V computer fans hooked up to a variable voltage adapter which I spliced and connected. It's hooked into the outlet on the back of the reciever, and has been for quite a while. I haven't noticed any significant problems with this method.

     
  8. MikeTrotter

    MikeTrotter Agent

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    I still believe a fan will generate noise.This could come back through the receiver and cause noise problems.I may be wrong but have you ever read in a receiver manual where it tells you to plug a fan in it?This is just my thoughts on the subject.You should be able to find another outlet to plug a fan into.
     
  9. Mark Shannon

    Mark Shannon Screenwriter

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    But Mike, have you ever read in a reciever manual not to plug a fan into it? I haven't - not in my manual at least.

    As for the noise, yes, the fans themselves do create noise, but you woud have to have the ears of a bat to hear it when a movie is playing. Even with no sound, the noise is minimal. This is also one of the reasons I bought a variable voltage adapter. I can control the speed at which the fans spin by simply adjusting the voltage. Consequently, the higher the fan speed, the more noise is generated, but I never have to put the fans up to that speed.

    If I read your statement correctly, you're saying that the noise from the fans could travel into the reciever and somehw make it's way into the signal that is output by the speakers. Is this what you mean?

    If so, I haven't noticed any of that happening. I agree, mechanical interference can cause udsireable effects, but it's not like I have a blender plugged into the back of my reciever. Simply put - if you ask me at least - the motors in the fan aren't powerful enough to generate that much interference.
     

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