SVS sub question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kenny Booth, Apr 15, 2002.

  1. Kenny Booth

    Kenny Booth Stunt Coordinator

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    Has anyone had any experence using SVS subs in homes with concrete floors and concrete walls? I think this may be one reason I'm not getting the performance I expected.

    Any tricks or twinks out there?
     
  2. Richard Greene

    Richard Greene Stunt Coordinator

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    Concrete walls and floors make the room bass resonances much louder than plasterboard which acts as a bass membrane absorber. I have never heard good sound quality in a concrete room.

    But concrete also keeps the bass inside a room and little gets absorbed by the walls, so it will be LOUD and deep

    bass. A concrete floor is not so bad if the ceiling is flexible. My own room has a concrete slab floor.

    Many bass problems can be signifuicantly reduced with a parametric equalizer. But concrete is also a pretty good mid-range reflector and will need sound absorbtion treatment to control room reverberation.
     
  3. GabrielC

    GabrielC Stunt Coordinator

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    If you've got a concrete floor, a fast fix is to add a big area rug/carpet in the listening area. Same goes for hardwood floors. It makes quite a big difference, from experience.
     
  4. Kenny Booth

    Kenny Booth Stunt Coordinator

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    The interior of the outside concrete wall is covered with 2 x 4 studs, insulation & sheetrock. The concrete floor is covered with a thick pad and very thick carpet.

    I can get high SPLs but I can't FEEL the sound like I want.

    Question is this "wall shaking" butt kicking bass really shaking anything or are these really airborne acoustic waves that are shaking everything.

    If a tree falls in the woods and you can't hear it, can you feel it?
     
  5. GabrielC

    GabrielC Stunt Coordinator

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    Ah, I see what you're getting at, same problem with me, but my situation is a little different. I don't know whether to attribute it to my concrete with hardwood floor with area rug on top, or to my VERY open space, it's not even close to a closed theatre room [​IMG] The carpet did make a huge difference, but I still couldn't feel the bass hitting.
    I tried moving it to my room though, which is a conventional carpeted room and a smaller closed area, and I could feel it for sure!
    so...I guess my answer to your question is that I don't have one, I'm looking for the same solution too!
     
  6. Matt Meyer

    Matt Meyer Stunt Coordinator

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    For me and my SVS it was night and day with its placement. In the rear, in the corner next to the listening postion(where I wanted it)It sounded weak and lifeless. Now in moving it up front behind a main speaker in another corner it came alive and it is everything I hoped it would be. I would have never thought that those 2 places could be so different. Shows you what I know.[​IMG]
    Matt
     
  7. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Kenny,

    What you need with a room like that is a Tactile Transducer like the "buttkicker". It's a bass shaker. You mount it to your floor/couch/chair/etc... and hook it up to your LFE output and drive it with an amp. It shakes and vibrates everything.

    Kenny, what was the problem you are facing again? have you actually measured the output of your subs? Maybe you have a line level mismatch if you are using a PRO amp.
     
  8. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    I have a concrete slab and a very open floor plan and have trouble getting "room shake" with dual 12" subs. The addition of a Crown K2 has helped in that area somewhat and my new 18" sub that I'm building will help even more![​IMG]
    Brian
     
  9. Tom Vodhanel

    Tom Vodhanel Cinematographer

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    Concrete flooring can definitely reduce the perceived bass output by reducing/eliminating the tactile effect going through the flooring. For this reason some folks build a wooden *subfloor* to gain back some of this tactile sensation in their HT. Adding more woofage is another option.(along with adding a TT).

    TV
     

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