SVideo/Composite together on DB930

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by jmascio, Jan 11, 2002.

  1. jmascio

    jmascio Extra

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    Hey all, a question about interconnects have I.
    I have a Sony STR-DB930 Reciever as well as various Video sources (Sony C650D DVD Carousel, JVC SVHS VCR, Dreamcast, SuperNES, Cable Box). My question refers to Composite Video and S-Video switching from the DB930 to my Sony Televison. For a few years now (the time I've owned and loved the DB930) I've just used composite RCA cables (Left Audio/Right Audio/Video)to interconnect all of my units to and from the Reciever. The DB930 also has Svideo and Composite 'Monitor' outputs, which I connect to my Televison (of which I used Composite). Whew.
    Anyway, after moving to Manhattan recently and reinstalling my HT setup, I noticed some interference and general video degredation when watching some DVD's. I've read for the longest time that the gamut of Video Excellence from low to high goes Composite, S-Video, Component. I thought it might be a good time to upgrade to Svideo between all my components.
    Getting to my question (don't worry, soon enough).... I have SVideo interconnects for my DVD, VCR, Dreamcast, and SNES, so all is well there. My question is, on the db930 is the previously mentioned 'Monitor' ouput (to my TV) switched to only one of the outputs (svideo or composite), or could both be used together? Meaning, If I have Svideo and Composite outputs running to my TV's Composite and Svideo inputs, and Im running a few components on SVideo and a few on Composite, will everything coexist, or is it down to one or another? While most of my video sources are Svideo 'ready', If I was to hook up another video source thats composite only (maybe my computer, or another game system), i dont want to be SOL. [Yes, its possible that anotehr game system or computer could be svideo, but for the sake of argument, lets say they're not [​IMG]]
    thanks much.
     
  2. Kevin Golding

    Kevin Golding Stunt Coordinator

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    I have the DB940 and use both a composite and s-video cable from the receiver to the TV. They will co-exist just fine, you will just have to change the input on your TV when you switch from one source to another. S-video sources will only be sent through the s-video cable, and the same for composite.
    DVDs and games should look much better through the s-video [​IMG]
     
  3. Jim_Stu

    Jim_Stu Stunt Coordinator

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    If your receiver cost more than 1000 USD and is

    less than 3 years old it may have an internal

    composite to S-video converter. However, most do

    not. Therefore the receiver will switch:

    1) Only composite inputs to the composite output.

    2) Only S-video inputs to the S-video output.

    3) Only component video to the component video output.

    Two sources for in-line composite/S-video converters are:

    1) Radio Shack (20 USD)

    2) Entech/Monster (100 USD)

    I have found the following receivers do have the

    converters built in:

    Kenwood - The 3 most expensive units, 2001 & 2002 models.

    Onkyo - DS797 & DS898 only.

    JRS
     
  4. jmascio

    jmascio Extra

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    Hey,

    thanks guys, i'll give it a whirl tonight. I have a few inputs on the rear of my TV, so I'll split up the Svideo and Composite to different inputs and see how it works.

    thanks again!

    Justin
     
  5. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Just a few pitfalls to be aware of, for some folks there may be no way to avoid them.
    1. Some TV sets, especially thgose with just one yellow video jack, one S-video jack, and one video choice on the remote, might not work properly with plugs in both jacks. If you are buying a new TV, it should have at least three (video 1, video 2, video 3, etc.) choices on the remote if you want component video, two choices for S-video, more such choices and rear jacks if you don't want to buy a receiver.
    2. The composite to S-video converters named above will give a worse picture compared with feeding composite directly into the TV, if the TV has a good comb filter. For VHS tape the degradation may be unnoticeable due to the limitations of that medium.
    3. Dish receivers and other broadcast equipment may deliver better quality on analog channels (if any) via composite as opposed to S-video (while at the same time the digital channels are delivered better via S-video if available). Again it depends on the quality of the comb filter in the TV.
    4. There is no guarantee of the quality of the composite to S-video conversion within a receiver unless you have auditioned the equipment or it advertises a comb filter with at least "three lines" or with "3D".
    5. The most obvious problem seen with inferior composite to S-video conversion is dot crawl, a zipper effect where two contrasting colors meet. It is worse with some color combinations than others. You can conduct tests using a DVD player connected via its yellow video jack.
    Figuring this all out is a trial and error process.
    The bottom line is that simplicity (fewer cables) and convenience (fewer buttons to push on your remotes) is almost always a tradeoff in picture quality.
    Other video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  6. Jim_Stu

    Jim_Stu Stunt Coordinator

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    jmascio,
    How is the new set-up coming along?
    I would like to explain, my views are the exact opposite from Allan's.
    My system is used every day for: multiple room (CD, Tape,&
    tuner) listening, TV, and a couple of DVDs per week.
    Because the 'simplicity' I'm looking for is 'ease of use',
    I send everything to the receiver.
    My 'wife-friendly' [​IMG] system:
    Video:
    IN: Cable TV > VCR > Entech converter > REC'VR (via S-video)
    IN: DVD > REC'VR (via S-video)
    OUT: REC'VR > Sony WEGA (via S-video)
    Audio:
    IN: VCR > REC'VR (via 2 analog cables)
    IN: DVD > REC'VR (via fiber optic cable)
    IN: CD deck > REC'VR (via fiber cable)
    IN: Tape deck > REC'VR (via 2 analog cables)
    The cable channels are tuned via the VCR, and the TV
    is used as a 'monitor' only. The receiver's remote
    performs 100% of all 'playback' functions.
    In my testing, I was unable to see any difference between
    switched S-video and direct component video while viewing
    both the Avia test patterns and some TOYS2 scenes.
    So there you have it. The two major approaches to HT
    hook-up: Tech superiority (ALLAN), and 'operator-friendly'
    (mine). However, some of the new remote controls are going
    to make all systems 'operator-friendly' in the near future.
    JRS
     

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