What's new

Surround Speaker Placement Help: Unique room with couch against one wall (1 Viewer)

ifresh21

Auditioning
Joined
Jan 2, 2011
Messages
4
Real Name
Josh
Hey guys,


[Setup]

I am new to surround sound and am trying to upgrade the surround sound in one of my rooms to a 7.1 channel system. I ordered (5) Polk RM7 speakers (one of them is a center) http://www.polkaudio.com/homeaudio/rm2008/index.php?s=rm7 and the Yamaha V667 Receiver http://usa.yamaha.com/products/audio-visual/av-receivers-amps/rx/rx-v667/?mode=model . I will most likely order this speaker stand for maximum height on my surround speakers (rear) http://www.sanus.com/us/en/products/speaker-foundations/sp-hover/HF1 .

[Question]


The problem is that my room doesn't really allow me to place rear surrounds in the ideal positions (90 to 110 degrees and if I understand correctly, a few feet from the couch). My couch is almost right next to the wall and I plan on purchasing a new couch which might be slightly larger and have to be pushed completely over to the wall :0.





How should I place the speakers when the couch is so close to/on the wall? I have to use speaker stands - speakers mounted on the wall/ceiling isn't an option unfortunately. Since I am using stands, should the speakers be aimed down towards the viewers from behind or should they be level? If they are level, should they be facing forward, at the audience, or towards each other? That confuses me. They are Bipole speakers.

----

[Bonus Questions :) ]

I have two more relatively insignificant questions: I plan on putting my center speaker in the top/center cabinet inside the under TV console. I will most likely put the left and right speakers either on the wall or the side of the console. The speakers would all be at the same level, but much lower than ear level for the viewers. Would tilting all of these speakers upwards so that they point at ear level sound good? (Is that the best way to do it)


I have two (old) nutone in wall speakers mounted high on the wall at the rear of the room and would like to integrate these into the system as the rear channels so that I can have 7.1 surround. How bad will this sound :) ? Of course, it won't be timbre matched. Are there any adjustments I can make on my receiver so that they sound as close as possible to my Polk RM7s and improve the overall system rather than make it worse (if that's what it might do)? I want it to sound really good, but I don't think that I am much of an audiophile, and the others listening to the system most definitely are not going to be able to distinguish imperfections.

And one more that doesn't really matter - Do I have to be concerned with sound leakage on the left side of the room? Any adjustments I should make because of that? Also, the front speakers will kind of be in a nook smaller than the rest of the room - should I be concerned or make adjustments? I am guessing those are tough questions.



Thanks a ton for any and all help!! I tried to keep the questions as concise as possible - if I need to clarify or add detail, pleasee let me know. I wasn't sure if I should do separate threads for the questions. Thanks again!


Here are some more pics (sorry about low quality)-




Room dimensions: 21x13. The nook where the tv is is 8.5x5.5 with the left wall being 3.5 deep. Tv wall is 10 feet from the couch right now.
 

winniw

Second Unit
Joined
Dec 19, 2010
Messages
287
Real Name
Nick Reed
I think that the key here will be... experimentation.

In an audiophile 2-channel system it is usually best to have the speakers positioned so that they are "aimed" at the seated listener's ear. Now that is with a conventional front-firing speaker, which you system does not employ. This may be the case for your front channel, maybe not. You have the luxury of being able to try it both ways and deciding for yourself, which way you prefer.


I always have to quality that I am a multi-channel newbie, so my advice on side or rear channel speakers may not apply. The first thing that I would try with the side channel is to aim the right channel speaker at the left seating position and the left speaker at the right seating position. Why? Well, since the right speaker in closer to the right seat, if you aim it at that listener, they will be getting all of the sound directly and that will drown-out the left channel, completely. However, if you aim it at the left listener, the extra dB's of sound will reach out to that position and hopefully balance better with the left channel that they are getting indirectly. Again, this is with conventional speakers, so... maybe not. OTOH, perhaps the side channel speakers (placed behind the sofa) would be better, aimed toward each other. That way, no ear is getting the hot-spot of the tweeter firing right at them. Experiment.


Who knows how your Nutone in-wall speakers will blend in? You already have them, you want to use them, so go with it.


I don't see how you could do anything about the door on the left wall and since no one is an audiophile, I wouldn't worry about it unless it becomes a very apparent problem later, and I doubt that it will.


Remember that every time you change your front or side speaker positions, you will need to run your Yamaha's YPAO setup to optimize everything.


Let us know how it works out!
 

ifresh21

Auditioning
Joined
Jan 2, 2011
Messages
4
Real Name
Josh
Thanks for all the detail winniw. I never thought about the placement positions you mentioned - i'll be sure to try those.


When trying out different positioning, should I change any settings on the receiver manually, or just leave it up to YPAO?
 

winniw

Second Unit
Joined
Dec 19, 2010
Messages
287
Real Name
Nick Reed
The first thing that I would try would be to place the speakers in the easiest and best looking position (where I wanted them) and let YPAO sort it out.

That's what YPAO does. It corrects for speaker placement and room irregularities. Of course, you don't want to make it's job impossible but give it a shot. For example, tilting your front speakers... if you don't have the proper mount or bracket to do that, don't tilt them and see if you get acceptable results. Now if you run YPAO and are not satisfied with your center channel volume, the you may need to tilt it or manually adjust the frequency response. I am not familiar with the operation of YPAO, so I don't know if it is easy to over-ride it on one channel or not. YPAO should smooth out the door problem and the mis-matched rear channel to some degree too, or so I would think.

Nick
 

ifresh21

Auditioning
Joined
Jan 2, 2011
Messages
4
Real Name
Josh
Originally Posted by winniw

The first thing that I would try would be to place the speakers in the easiest and best looking position (where I wanted them) and let YPAO sort it out.

That's what YPAO does. It corrects for speaker placement and room irregularities. Of course, you don't want to make it's job impossible but give it a shot. For example, tilting your front speakers... if you don't have the proper mount or bracket to do that, don't tilt them and see if you get acceptable results. Now if you run YPAO and are not satisfied with your center channel volume, the you may need to tilt it or manually adjust the frequency response. I am not familiar with the operation of YPAO, so I don't know if it is easy to over-ride it on one channel or not. YPAO should smooth out the door problem and the mis-matched rear channel to some degree too, or so I would think.

Nick

Hopefully you are right. I think I will try to do my best to adjust things before using YPAO though.



Anyone else have any suggestions?
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Forum Sponsors

Latest Articles

Forum statistics

Threads
353,186
Messages
5,010,755
Members
143,417
Latest member
bolorkay
Recent bookmarks
0
Top