Surge question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Neil Joseph, Nov 22, 2002.

  1. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    I have just pre-wired my new HT and got the contractors to install a ceiling electrical outlet outlet near the ceiling mounted projector (Sony VPL-VW11HT). I have seen surge protectors ranging from $1 mickey mouse deals, to cdn$100 Monster outlet that plugs into a regular double outlet, to fancy units costing hundreds of dollars that sit in the component rack.

    How good is the Monster suppressor (don't know model) that costs about cdn$100? It is a box with 2 sets of outlet prongs that plug into a regular outlet. The box itself has 2 outlets of its own.

    Thanks,
     
  2. Steve Schaps

    Steve Schaps Auditioning

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    I don't know how good the Monster unit is but I just built my own units. If you are into DIY it is a good project with a lot of satisfaction that you built it yourself.

    I just built 3 units,

    1- for my projector and Subwoofer
    2- for all of my Mains powered equipment(power amplifiers, etc)
    3- for all my video and audio sources fed from my UPS.

    All of the units cost me less that $100US which I have a total of 20 protected outlets, more than enough for the biggest home theater.

    Hope this helps
    Steve
     
  3. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    I'd love to hear more about how you did it Steve.
    Neil: Sounds like you're talking about your own home, yes? Well assuming you've got a homeowners insurance plan in place, and that what you're really trying to do is
    a) provide some localized protection
    b) maybe provide a bit of reduction of any potential line born emi/rfi
    c) something cost effective
    then several guidelines come to mind.
    I'd not buy a basic 1 or 5 dollar unit. Likely they're using the smallest of MOV's to do the job.
    I'd direct my searches towards units that met the specification of UL 14449. I don't know what the equivalent canadian spec is.
    more likely than not, that surge suppressor is also going to have a bit of filtration that'll lower EMI/RFI about 20 dB.
    If you're interested in maybe tying something into the mains, i've had a little email corresopondence with a fella out in canada that's a distributor for www.oneac.com which is a company that provides industrial grade isolation transformer approaches for lighting/surge protection and also will drop your noise floor a whoooooooooooooole bunch. let me know if you're interested and i'll pm you his addy. i understand he does also carry some demo units from time to time that get unloaded at a discount. i plan on posting a summary of his and my email correspondence in the next day or so.
    BTW, you might find some of the literature at this site to be informative.
     
  4. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Neil,
    I dont remember how you eventually decided to connect the electrical wire from the ceiling mount, but let's say you are asking about a surge protector for the front projector on the ceiling electrical outlet.
    While Monster makes a 2-plug unit, primarily for subwoofers located at some distance from the main surge protector, it costs about $50 U.S. I have been suggesting the Panamax Max 2 for $30 U.S., a bargain even with Canadian tax, Here.
    It contains the same internal protection hardware as its bigger box cousins, is U.L. 1449 Listed and carries the same $5 million connected equipment warranty.
    Let us know if this fits your needs.
    bill
     
  5. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

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  6. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    i wish AR provided something other than words to help the user out.
     
  7. RussKon

    RussKon Stunt Coordinator

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  8. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    The home builder would not allow me to wire in my own power so I had to pay [​IMG] them cdn$160 to place an outlet in the ceiling for me. I want a surge protector that plugs directly into that outlet and then the pj will plug into the surge protector. The Panamax and Monster boxes seem to fit my requirements. If it has $5M protection that sounds good to me. basically I want something that has equal protection to the fancy unit I saw in a component rack of a HT store but without the big $$$.
     
  9. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Neil,

    While Chu Gai might suggest starting with a whole house surge suppressor at the Main Service Panel, we also look to point-of-use surge protectors for the components to control any anomalies within the home electrical wiring system and for the AC line noise filters these smaller suppresors nearly all contain.

    We really dont want to think about relying on a $5million warranty, since we want the protector to do its job and "save" the component(s) even if it means the protector kills itself in the process. Then you ask Panamax to replace it. (I havent asked them if this is free, but I intend to find out).

    Anyway, the Panamax Max 2 that goes into the ceiling outlet carries the same basic surge elements as larger models: 330 volt clamping level and 52,000-amp spike capacity.

    Yes, it is a MOV-based unit and may not last forever. But for $30 bucks US, I dont see any downside if you are not set up wiring-wise for one of those Series Mode or "ultimate" lightning protector boxes.

    bill
     
  10. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Neil,
    Here’s another idea, a small MOV surge suppressor built into a receptacle. Look at the 8381 Leviton model HERE
    Also here’s another thread and a picture of one here
     
  11. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    As a secondary means of protection against modest surges, I think Bill's suggestion merits consideration especially when one considers the placement of your outlet. Along those lines Neil, you may wish to consider devices that employ gas-discharge (rather old) for your cable feeds to your equipment. Their insertion loss is quite minimal, typically 1 dB or less at 1 gHz and may provide you with additional peace of mind.
    Examples of these types of products can be found at the following sites:
    #1
    #2
    There's a whole bunch of equivalent products out there and if for some reason one of the one's i mentioned strikes your fancy, you can give them a call and see who your local distributor might be. So long as it doesn't say audiophile, the financial hit shouldn't be too bad [​IMG]
     

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