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Supplying speaker with too much power?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Joseph_Mikhail, Apr 17, 2002.

  1. Joseph_Mikhail

    Joseph_Mikhail Stunt Coordinator

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    I have a center channel capable of 150 Watt amplification. I wanted to biamp the signal to the speaker however that would result in delivering 175 Watts to the speaker.

    Will running this setup damage the speaker?
     
  2. MarkO

    MarkO Second Unit

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    Not likely. Better to have too much power than not enough.
     
  3. Joseph_Mikhail

    Joseph_Mikhail Stunt Coordinator

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    Cool. Thanks.
     
  4. jeff cr

    jeff cr Agent

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    this is a hard concept to understand. i have heard before that to little of power is worse, but enlighten me on this. i read the sensitivity of a speaker is given at db/w/m or something like that. so if you had a speaker that had a sensitivity of say 89 db, the speaker would produce 89 db at 1 meter with 1 watt applied. that is pretty loud. and i have also read that the average power sent to the speakers for average listening is under 20 watts per channel. obviously thats average and not peak. so my question is how can you really under power speakers to cuase them damage. thanks for any info.
     
  5. RichardH

    RichardH Supporting Actor

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    The idea is that if your amp is underpowered, it's more likely that you'll ask it to do more than it can. When you do that, it will clip the signal. A clipped signal is like asking the woofer to move out, stay there, then come back in. Woofers don't like that, and it can results in melting the voice coil.

    With tweeters, square waves will have the same effect, and can melt them as well.

    That is pretty simplified and general, but it should give you the idea.
     
  6. Jeffrey_Jones

    Jeffrey_Jones Second Unit

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    In my experience more power is almost always better. Having a high power amp provides you with headroom and will help ensure the amp isn't clipping, distorting, etc. Distortion will kill a speaker much more quickly then too much power. You do reach a point of diminishing returns when your amp is more powerful then you will ever be able to use. As long as you are not overdriving your speakers to the point of over-excursion, you are safe.

    - Jeff
     

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