Superman/Smallville question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Hunter P, Mar 5, 2003.

  1. Hunter P

    Hunter P Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2002
    Messages:
    1,483
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was curious about the Superman mythos. Exactly when did Clark become Superman? Before or after his move to Metropolis?

    I never read the comics but I thought that the creation Superboy was kind of revisionist history. Or is Superboy part of the "official" Superman timeline?

    I am curious about this because I wanted to know if Superboy would make his debut on Smallville. Or would that offend the purists?
     
  2. Jason Seaver

    Jason Seaver Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1997
    Messages:
    9,306
    Likes Received:
    0
    Superboy was revisionist history, but doesn't exist any more (convoluted explanation about multiple DC Universes snipped). The current continuity is that Clark's powers manifested and grew more powerful as he grew older because he's a sort of solar battery, and has been storing solar energy.

    I believe Superman debuted and Clark arrived in Metropolis at the same time.
     
  3. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 1999
    Messages:
    11,267
    Likes Received:
    0
    Since Smallville ALREADY offends the purists.... [​IMG]
     
  4. Adam Lenhardt

    Adam Lenhardt Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2001
    Messages:
    17,603
    Likes Received:
    2,114
    Location:
    Albany, NY
     
  5. Hunter P

    Hunter P Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2002
    Messages:
    1,483
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks, Jason.

    I guess we won't be seeing Krypto any time soon too. [​IMG]

    What about Supergirl? Is she part of the current continuity?
     
  6. Thi Them

    Thi Them Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 1999
    Messages:
    3,649
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is Lana Lane supposed to be Lois Lane, or is she a different character?

    ~T
     
  7. Peter McDonald

    Peter McDonald Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2001
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  8. Thomas H G

    Thomas H G Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yea and is she --Lana Lane going to come into play in Smallville anytime soon?
     
  9. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 1999
    Messages:
    11,267
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you mean Lois Lane, considering that Clark doesn't meet her for about a decade after this is taking place, I doubt that even the producers of Smallville would blaspheme that much
     
  10. Dan Rudolph

    Dan Rudolph Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    4,042
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sipergirl is part of current continuity, but is not related to Clark. She is a sort of surrogate sister, though. She isn't Kryptonian, either.
     
  11. Jason Seaver

    Jason Seaver Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1997
    Messages:
    9,306
    Likes Received:
    0
    Actually, there are currently three Supergirls running around:

    * Linda Danvers, who had merged with the post-Crisis Supergirl, a protoplasmic shapeshifter "Matrix" (whom the Kents adopted; they called her "Mae") that had escaped from a pocket universe where Lex Luthor was a hero standing up against General Zod. She wears the white midriff-baring costume that first appeared in the Superman animated series.

    * Kara Zor-El, who was the original Supergirl, killed during the Crisis (but Crisis erased her from history, anyway). But, somehow her ship crossed between parallel universes. She wears the classic blue dress.

    (They appear in the "Supergirl" comic, which ends next month with issue #80, and the implication is that at least one won't survive it)

    * Cir-El, who just showed up in January's "Superman: The Ten Cent Adventure", about whom we know basically nothing, although it's been implied that she's Clark's daughter brought back in time by the Futuresmiths (about whom we know even less). She appears in "Superman".


    At least Krypto's in the comics, though. [​IMG] Sure, it took a long and ridiculous crossover, but I like seeing him around again.
     
  12. Jesse Blacklow

    Jesse Blacklow Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,049
    Likes Received:
    0
    I thought Superboy was a clone of Kal-El created by Cadmus Labs around the time Superman "died" fighting Doomsday? The spoilers section of KryptonSite says:

    * A young man named Cyrus with powers very similar to Clark's shows up in Smallville. Cyrus can apparently do everything Clark can, but he won't tell him what *else* is possible for him to do.

    Personally, I used to be a comics purist (see: Comic Book Guy from the Simpsons), but I love cheesy superhero flicks enough to be a big Smallville fan. There's no reason for anyone to get their panties in a bunch over the difference between comics and TV/Movies. Especially since Millar & Gough stated from the beginning that the Smallville mythos has nothing to do with DC Comic's Superman mythos--they just licensed the characters.
     
  13. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 1999
    Messages:
    11,267
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  14. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1999
    Messages:
    38,717
    Likes Received:
    463
    Sigh...
     
  15. Jesse Blacklow

    Jesse Blacklow Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,049
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is that a sigh lamenting Smallville's lack of adherence to the comics, or of us bickering about it [​IMG]
     
  16. Jason Seaver

    Jason Seaver Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1997
    Messages:
    9,306
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  17. Jesse Blacklow

    Jesse Blacklow Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,049
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well said, Jason. Millar et al have some good people on their staff (Mark Verheiden and Jeph Loeb come to mind). I could do without most of the crappy alt-rock and the product placement, but the story itself ain't that bad.

    Licensing doesn't require strict adherence to the source, otherwise there would be no room for interpretation. In some cases (Batman and Robin or Birds of Prey) this can be a bad thing, but for others (Smallville or The Tick) the result is pretty good.
     
  18. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1999
    Messages:
    38,717
    Likes Received:
    463
    It's virtually impossible, given the number of stories from the comics, to do a "canonical" version of Superboy/Superman. And to try to label it as "blasphemy" if the creators on Smallville "deviate" from the bountiful source material of the comics is such creatively bankrupt notion, it lends itself to such an insular/regurgitative worldview of these characters which would give the viewers nothing new, no surprises, no growth in these iconic characters and supporting characters.

    I am glad the creators working on Smallville are taking whatever elements from the comic book source material and creating their own spin on the characters and giving us a show that's very tasty and inviting, rather than a bland show that sticks strictly to the comic book "recipe/blueprint".

    Smallville is the story of what might happen if Clark's ship landed in Smallville in 1990. It's not the story of what must happen because he's a licensed character from DC Comics (Warners).
     
  19. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 1999
    Messages:
    11,267
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  20. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    Messages:
    12,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    IIRC, Superboy has existed as a part of comics since the early 50s.

    To add a bit to Patrick's post, the whole mythos has changed from time to time, as the fortunes of comics in general and Superman in particular waxed and waned.

    Why then, should the latest effort not be allowed artistic and creative freedom? What came before was not consistent, so to try to force a TV series into one vision would itself be inconsistent.
     

Share This Page