Suggestions on FPTV Setup

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike OConnell, Oct 27, 2001.

  1. Mike OConnell

    Mike OConnell Second Unit

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    I am comparing the cost of a Mitsu 73" Diamond Line RPTV (probably around $6500? delivered)to a FPTV setup. I have measured the room and determined the following:
    My seating position is about 15 feet from the wall that the screen would be mounted and the wall is 15'-10" wide and the ceiling height is 7'-6". The ceiling is a suspended ceiling and I installed an outlet about 11 feet back from the front wall in the studs beneath the suspended ceiling. In addition, I have installed a couple of 1" flexible conduits to run cable from an area that is now behind the TV cabinet to the projector location.
    Centering a screen on the front wall allows for a 92" diagonal screen (45Hx80W) and for aesthetic/frame/size purposes the Stewart SND92H with the Velux applique was an agreable type of look for the wife. I am not stuck on Stewart, it is an example of what I would like a screen to look like when complete. This size of screen would go from just left of the light switch to just left of the frame box-out that is visible by the ceiling. The top of the screen frame would be just below the box out to the bottom of the frame approximately 29" above the floor. This allows me room for a 21" tall double-wide shelving unit (flexi-rack or Salamander designs) below the screen for my receiver, DVD, etc. and allow me the 8" to place my Paradigm Reference CC (8" high) on top of the cabinet.
    My viewing is probably 50% TV and 50% movies. My TV service is Time Warner cable (non-digital) and a VCR with a standard composite video out would be used. I do not currently own a progressive scan DVD player, but want to make sure whatever projector I purchase can be used for future formats (as best as feasible). HDTV would come to mind as well as prog. scan.
    The ambient lighting can be well controlled in the room.
    What would you recommend?
    I have thought about an LCD projector (around $5000 +/- and a Stewart Grayhawk screen (or equal - preferably cheaper -$1000) that can do 16:9, HDTV, prog scan, and has a stretch mode for 4:3)
    See current HT pictures at the following:
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/bbs/...ent/28828.html
    Thanks,
    Mike
    P.S. Once I get this puppy installed I plan on having a KC area gathering for the HTF members at my house - probably winter or early spring).
     
  2. Mike OConnell

    Mike OConnell Second Unit

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    Bump
     
  3. Brian_J

    Brian_J Second Unit

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    You should look into getting a used CRT. They can be cheaper than a new digital projector with much better pictures (IMHO). You would want to set up a home theater PC. Which is not difficult and allows custom scaling of DVD's. Check out the crt and HTPC forums at avsforum. Otherwise check out this site for digital projectors: http://www.projectorcentral.com/ . I definitely would not get the 73" Mitsu. as the price is just too high for what is really a BIG black box. But if you still look at a lot of TV you might want to consider having a small to mid sized RPTV and a projector.
    Brian
    ------------------
    Zed's Dead Baby...
     
  4. Carlos_R

    Carlos_R Extra

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    I would second that,
    If you have good control of your lighting a FPCRT set up is the way to, go better image quality.
    I was able to get/do an entry level 7" CRT, HTPC,a DIY screen, Kenwood 5.1 system for less than $2,500. For everyday viewing I use a vvega 32" w/ a Tosh 3109 DVD.
    The set-up of a CRT is slightly more time consuming but the image that you are able to get is well worth the time invested. see AVSFORUM.COM for more info on CRT's or digital projectors.
    good luck,
    carlos_r
    ECP4100, HTPC(W/Radeon 64vivo, ATI 4.1 DVD)
    DIY 80X45 (16x9 painted fabric screen)
    Kenwood 5.1 system DD/dts
     
  5. Huey

    Huey Agent

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    I don't think a huge 100# or more CRT will meet his wife's approval. With a ceiling height of 7'6" and this sucker hanging another 12-14" down will leave 6' head room--can you say head banger?
    I think with your room size a digital PJ is a perfect choice. Definitely a native 16:9 LCD PJ like the Sanyo PLV-60 ($4500) and a Stewart Grayhawk ($1000) will give you beautiful imagery. If you want to save money, make your own gray screen although the Grayhawk will have more gain due to special coating (most gray screen have negative gain of 0.8 while Grayhawk will have 0.95 gain with 1 being neutral). There is also a new DLP called Sharp z9000 that's 16:9. DLP has better contrast for better blacks (close to CRT).
    Yes CRT has the best image, blah, blah, blah... BUT it's not as bright, crisp, user friendly (professional installation and calibration ($500) with frequent convergence "touch-ups" (monthly), nor as portable which is what you need for your low-ceiling room. Check out www.avsforum.com for digital and CRT forums and decide for yourself. Go see CRT vs. digital and choose for yourself as it's your money. Plus for your budget, a used CRT has possibilities of burn-ins without much if any warranty, etc.
    The new technology is definitely digital. Throw in a hometheater PC, progressive DVD player, or external scaler/deinterlacer (digital has scaler and deinterlacer builtin and is good for most PJ but external units will still be better; CRT does not have built-in anything--everything is extra) and your image will be great. If you don't mind black bars which can be masked off and disappear when lights are lowered, 4:3 PJ is more economical and can be brighter for the same 4-5K level. Infocus LP530 is one that's received good reviews with 2000 lumens (compared to anemic 800 (9" tubes) or less lumens of CRT), 400:1 contrast for 4K with Dell's 20% discount (5K retail).
     
  6. Mike OConnell

    Mike OConnell Second Unit

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    Thanks for the ideas. I think Huey picked up on a point that I hadn't thought of - headroom. We like to move furniture around and try out different settings and a minimum of 6'6" is a must.
    This may rule out many CRT's.
    I am not sure about the computer route. I am not really very good with computers. I can handle sufing, excel, word, e-mail. I still have not figured out alot of bells and whistles that I have on this computer. Not enough time.
    I want something that I can enjoy without computer programming.....
    Thanks,
    Mike
     
  7. Carlos_R

    Carlos_R Extra

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    Yes, the new technology is definitely digital blah, blah, blah... BUT it's not the best image. digital PJ for $5K or CRT PJ for $1k (entry level 7")
    professional installation not required.
    convergence "touch-ups" (every SIX months)
    initial installation will be time consumming only the first time.
    black bars with 2.35 oar movies is obvious but you can still mask these bars on your screen.
    ECP4100/(07MS) 7" CRT has 725 lumens, and better image quality than a digital PJ with 2000 lumens.
    ECP9500 8" CRT has 1100+ lumnes.
    9" CRT's have 1300+ lumens, and digital is not able to match its picture quality yet. A dlp(digital)PJ is approx. $12k+ and it come the nearest.
    Low ceiling, our family room has a 9ft ceiling and my wife still did not want to PJ up their. I built a coffee table to place the Pj inside. Floor mount is an option.
    hometheater PC: A Radeon video card comes bundled with its own ATI4.1 DVD software (the best picture quality) add a soundcard with 5.1 sound capabilities. place the disk in the tray and press play. No programming required unless you are a tweeker.
    this is just my opinion youre mileage may vary. Lets see 5k+ for digital or 1K+(7" crt/better image) my wife was happy with the economical choice I made.
    have fun with whatever of the two formats you decide to
    choose from, they both have their plus, and minus points.
    Just try to get the correct facts and a demo is a must.
    AVSFORUM.COM
    good luck,
    carlos_r
     

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