Suggestions for DIY speaker stands?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Patrick Sun, May 25, 2001.

  1. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    Okay, with these new 24" tall and heavy speakers that I just built, I need taller speakers stands than my current 7" tall stands I'm currently using. With 2 cats around, I'm sort of scared of the heavy speakers being knocked off the stands if they decide to jump up on the stands themselves. I think the stands will need to be around 21" tall. I'm also thinking their footprint will need to be a square, perhaps 15"x15". Should I just build a 10"x10"x20" center "pillar" filled with sand with 15"x15" pieces for the top and bottom of the stand?
    I don't think a flexy-stand will be viable unless I basically create a 3-level flexy-rack that's around 20" tall, and 15"x15" wide/deep.
    I'm almost tempted to just buy some short barstools since I use them for my rear speakers. [​IMG]
    Any ideas?
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  2. Scott M

    Scott M Agent

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    Pat,
    My rear speakers are on 36" high plaster pillars. They have about an 8" x 8" stem with a 12" x 12" base and are hollow so I guess they could be filled. They had lost of different sizes. Just a suggestion. I got them at a craft store but I can't remember the name just now, $20 each(which was pretty cheap).
    I have two cats and only once have they ventured to the top and broke off a grill but then again my surrounds aren't even close to the size and weight of your mains. [​IMG].
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    -scott
     
  3. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    Hmm...that's an idea, I'll try places like Homeplace/Waccamaw and see if anything grabs me. My front speakers each weigh about 35 pounds (maybe more), so I'd hate to come home and find a squashed kitty cat underneath one of the speakers. Doh!
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  4. Phil A

    Phil A Producer

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    A 6x6 with 3/4 inch plywood for the base and top would likely be very sturdy and can be finished in a variety of ways with spikes or vibrapods as deemed necessary.
     
  5. Ray R

    Ray R Stunt Coordinator

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    Check out the pictures on my HT page of the stands I made. Basically two wood squares and three iron pipes with a threaded rod running through each pipe to hold everything together.
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    HT pictures
     
  6. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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  7. Dan M~

    Dan M~ Second Unit

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    I lived in Virginia for a few years, maybe thats why Phil and I think alike?
    Use your "tremendous" router skills to make two 15" sonotube end caps, route a recess in them to accept 6" dia PVC pipe (sewer pipe from HD, Lowes, etc.), attach one cap to 24" of pipe, fill with sand, add top "sono" cap and walla... a speaker stand!
    Paint the end caps to match your subwoofer and you have a coordinated Home Theater!
    Good luck, and if you think of it... take some pictures of what ever you do!! [​IMG]
    -Dan
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    -Dan M~
    My Small Collection
     
  8. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Patrick,
    Whatever you decide on, make the base as wide as possible and add spikes to the bottom! That's the only way to make sure the stands will be sturdy enough.
    Also, I'd think about adding threaded inserts to the bottom of the speaker enclosures so that you could bolt them on to the stands from beneath the top of the platform that the speakers sit on.
    Other than that, all I can say is one squished kitty will make the other one think twice about attempting the same feat! [​IMG]
    Brian
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  9. Greg Monfort

    Greg Monfort Supporting Actor

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    Pat,
    The last time I was in Micheal's, they had a selection of plaster columns. I've used preformed concrete slabs and various marble slabs for bases that make them ~child tipover proof, so cats should be a piece o'cake.
    GM
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    Loud is beautiful, if it's clean
     
  10. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Pat,
    I agree with Greg. Michael's does have a pretty good selection. I always notice them every time my wife drags me in there! We even bought one which is currently being used as a plant stand in our bathroom.
    Brian
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  11. Peter Johnson

    Peter Johnson Stunt Coordinator

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    Patrick,
    You can consider what I did. I needed 24" stands to support a pair of nOrh marble 7.0's, which are about 70 pounds each.
    I went to the local monumentalists (ie cemetary) and got 2 squares of 2" thick x 11" square (mine actually arent sqaure, but they could be..) sandstone, and a 6" square pillar, for each stand.
    So total of 4 squares and 2 pillars of limestone. I sanded them back, and drilled a hole in the top and bottom of each pillar, and on 1 side of each top/bottom plates.
    I pinned using a brass pin, and hard-core epoxy the top and bottom plates to the center pillar.
    I then sealed them using laquer (my cousin, who is a woodworker help me do all this).
    They look very very good, cost $50 + about 3hrs of my time.
    They weight about 110 pounds each... [​IMG]
     
  12. Brandon B

    Brandon B Second Unit

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    Another option:
    steel or iron threaded pipe flanges bolted to thick squares of plywood top and bottom with a length of pipe in between threaded on each end, finished however you see fit. Height would be easy to change later by substituting a different length pipe. Can also be broken down by unscrewing it if you need to transport it for some reason.
    Maybe enclose the steel pipe and flanges in a tube of some sort (ABS drain?) for appearance.
    Wood would have to be thick enough to countersink bolts into for flat bottoms and top.
    BB
     

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