Subwoofer Setup?

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Tal _E, Apr 11, 2004.

  1. Tal _E

    Tal _E Extra

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    I have a set of
    4x 402 bose
    2x 602 B&w
    which are wired into a nad 705 receiver. I'm also using the bose 402 equalizer in the pre in/out. My questions is what kind of subwoofer should i be looking for so the i could hook it up into my receiver. I understand that some subwoofer have built in amps. Should i be avoiding these? I really know nothing about subwoofers. Also if you have any suggestion for subs between $100 and $300 (preferably closer to the middle) it would be much appreciated.
     
  2. ScottCHI

    ScottCHI Screenwriter

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    correct me if i'm wrong, but isn't that just simply a stereo receiver?

    you'll have to provide some additional power to any sub that you add to your system, be that with an outboard amp and a passive sub or, more than likely, via a powered sub that has an amp built-in.

    exactly how you connect it is going to depend upon your particular speakers' capabilities and your own configuration needs.
     
  3. Tal _E

    Tal _E Extra

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    I guess it's just a receiver I'm sorry I don't know. So does that mean i need an "active" subwoofer. Do you know how I will be setting it up I really dont know. How will i hook it up using my equalizer and receiver, then will the speakers be connecting to my sub or to my receiver. Any information will help.


    I have a large room. If it helps.
     
  4. Tal _E

    Tal _E Extra

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    bump
     
  5. ScottCHI

    ScottCHI Screenwriter

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    have you visited THIS thread yet?
     
  6. Tal _E

    Tal _E Extra

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    Subwoofers

    A subwoofer is a dedicated speaker used to produce the lower frequencies (deep bass) that we can hear and in some cases, feel. They are essential in a home theatre because the other speakers in the setup seldom produce these low frequencies, which ultimately make the listening experience much closer to the real theatre's audio experience.

    There are various ways to connect a subwoofer....

    1- The most common way is to connect the receiver's "LFE out" to the subwoofer's "L and R" RCA terminals using a cable that is a single RCA on one end and splits to a dual RCA at the other end. A single RCA cable can also be used with a "Y splitter" that will provide the dual RCA ends for the sub hookup. One note on this: It is better to connect the receiver's LFE out to both of the subwoofers "L and R" inputs. Essentially, this will provide a volume level in the subwoofer twice as much as just connecting to the "L" alone, or the "R" alone. As an LFE sub, the subwoofer will only play "low frequency effects" as was intended by the audio material.

    2- Another way to connect the sub is to use traditional speaker wire and to connect from the receiver's "Front Left" and "Front Right" to the subwoofer's "L" and "R" speaker inputs, then connect the front left and front right speakers directly to the subwoofer. Essentially, the subwoofer will always play the low bass information from the front channels as apposed to an LFE sub that plays only "low frequency effects" as intended by the audio material.

    3- A third way to connect the sub is to use it as a dedicated surround sub. This is usually done only if used as a second subwoofer. When connected in the following manner, the sub will only play low frequency information from the surround left and surround right channels. The hookup is essentially the same as number 2 above, except the "surround left" and "surround right" are connected from the receiver to the sub's "L" and "R" inputs with traditional speaker wire and then the surround left and surround right speakers are connected to the subwoofer's "L" and "R" outputs.



    1.I don't see a LFE out in the back of my receiver, I see something called NAD LINK and pre out and pre in but the pre is for my equalizer.

    2.I have no front and back and all that just left and right. Also, I want the subwoofer to filter out the bass because my bose 402 dont play bass well at loud levels.

    3.N/A
     
  7. ScottCHI

    ScottCHI Screenwriter

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    you don't have an LFE output or front, center or back because you don't have a home theater surround sound receiver. you have a stereo receiver; 2-channels, right and left.

    how, may i ask, do you currently have the 6 speakers connected to your receiver? why do you have 6 speakers connected; are some located in other rooms?

    you can connect a subwoofer to your pre-outs, but, since you want to crossover you speakers, and short of buying an electronic crossover, you'll want to connect the sub to the speaker outputs and let the sub's built-in crossover handle the bass management.

    doubtful you'll want to connect all 6 of your speakers to the sub, though, or even 4, for that matter. so how do you envision running it, exactly?
     
  8. Tal _E

    Tal _E Extra

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    The speakers are chained together. All the speakers have two sets of knobs for continuing the chain. My question about the subwofoer and using pre in and pre out is how to i work that with my equalizer? hook the equalizer into the pre-out and then put its inputs into teh sub and then the sub into the pre-in. Or the otehr way around. I have 6 speakers in my room. 1 in each corner and 2 in the middle.

    What is a crossover?
     
  9. ScottCHI

    ScottCHI Screenwriter

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    WHAT is a crossover?


    so, you have the b&w's set-up as your "A" speakers and the BOSEs as your "B" (or vice versa) then, probably, correct?

    i'm assuming that you probably want to continue to run the b&w's as "full-range" speakers, but are interested in limiting the low-end information that the BOSEs receive, and letting a sub handle that.

    i'm unfamiliar with your eq's capabilities. do you think that the eq, alone, gives you the ability to reduce the lower frequencies satisfactorily, or do you want a different method, like that afforded by a subwoofer with a built-in crossover?

    some subwoofers do have pre-outs, but not all.
     
  10. Tal _E

    Tal _E Extra

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    Actually, My B&W and bose are all chained as channel A. But you are right i would like to keep my B&W's as full range if possible. My equalizer has no settigngs for the user to change its specifically designed for the BOSE 402's. So I would definately like to use a crossover on the bose speakers. And if possible i would like the equalizer to work just with the bose 402's.
     
  11. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    You have 6 different speakers running off one receiver, two of them being bose, and the other two being B&W?

    This isn't a trolling joke? wtf?
     
  12. Tal _E

    Tal _E Extra

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    4 bose 2 b&W. Why?
     
  13. ScottCHI

    ScottCHI Screenwriter

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    yes, exactly.

    why?
     
  14. Marc H

    Marc H Second Unit

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    Be nice guys.

    Credit to the NAD for not giving up under such a load. Does it get hot?

    Tal, best look for a powered sub that features high level inputs (speakerwire connections) and outputs.
    Connect the speaker A outputs from the Nad to the inputs on the sub and then the outputs to the speakers. That should also help ease the load a bit on the NAD.
     
  15. Tal _E

    Tal _E Extra

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    OK, That sounds good except what about my equalizer. That still hooks into my pre in pre out?

    Also, I don't understand whats wrong with having the 6 chained on the NAD? Should I have an AMP as well? I'm really audio illiterate ( I know the basics) I'm more of a computer person.

    (edit)
    It doesn't get hot.

    (edit)
    I've had it hooked up like this for months.
     
  16. Tal _E

    Tal _E Extra

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    bump
     
  17. Tal _E

    Tal _E Extra

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    cmon guys
     
  18. Jesse Sharrow

    Jesse Sharrow Supporting Actor

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    I think to do what you want. You will need a Surround sound receiver.
     
  19. ScottCHI

    ScottCHI Screenwriter

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    no, he just wants to add a sub to his "stereo".

    what more do you want to know, exactly, tal?
     
  20. Nathan W.

    Nathan W. Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm not sure the equalizer is even affecting the sound unless the pre-ins and pre-outs are a monitor loop intended for connecting signal altering components such as equalizers and sub-harmonic generators. And if it is such a loop, then the equalizer is affecting all of your speakers, including the B&Ws, since you have them all connected to the same speaker outputs. If you have a manual for the NAD it should say whether an equalizer or such can be connected.

    Are your speakers connected in series or parallel? Series would be going from a negative speaker terminal on your NAD to a negative terminal on one speaker, then from the positive terminal on the same speaker to the negative terminal on another, and so on til you reach the receiver's positive speaker terminal - a big speaker "loop," if I may. This setup raises the impedance (resistance) for each speaker that's connected.

    Parallel would be running seperate sets of wires to each speaker with each set connected to the same speaker terminals on the NAD. Or you could connect additional speakers by just jumpering off of the terminals on a speaker that's already wired, same thing. This setup lowers impedance for each speaker connected and can overload an amplifier.

    It's tough to give the right advice since I don't know the specifics of your NAD's connection capabilities concerning the equalizer and I can't find decent documentation on the web about it either, since it's relatively old. If I'm not mistaken, a simple tape loop won't work for an EQ. Which ever way your speakers are connected is also important to how you integrate a subwoofer into your system, that is if you connect it with the speaker level (high level) connectors. With your receiver I would go the high level route. That way the sub's volume would go up and down with the other speakers. A pre-amp connection would be simpler, but pre-amp connections have fixed volume levels that don't change with the master volume control, so you'd have to adjust the sub's volume on the sub itself and that will get quite annoying after awhile.

    You'll want a powered/active sub (has it's own amp) since your receiver is already driving three sets of speakers. Watch out though - some subs don't have speaker level connections these days. And some that do have them only have the inputs, no outputs.
     

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