subwoofer question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by EanH, Feb 8, 2002.

  1. EanH

    EanH Auditioning

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    Hello - I've got a problem tuning my subwoofer...first, my setup:
    Deftech 100 L/R
    Deftech ProCenter C2
    Deftech ProSub 80
    Deftech BP1X surrounds
    Denon 1801 receiver
    I've got the L/R wires running into the sub, and from sub out to the speakers, as recommended by Definitive. I've also tried using the LFE and running the speakers directly, but it blends much better thru the sub, and the problem still occurs.
    The problem is this - I've balanced everything using Avia and a sound meter, and it sounds great with movies like Ronin and Saving Private Ryan. However, with movies like U571, the sub sounds really boomy...even with some of the music! I have to turn the sub down considerably to get rid of the boominess.
    Any ideas? Is the sub too small or freq range too small?
    thanks!!!
    Ean
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    Even with a perfectly balanced configuration, some movies still require finetuning. (Not every sound designer or mixer adheres to the same standards. [​IMG]) If it's just an occasional film for which you have to make adjustments, you've probably done all you can. U-571 is notorious for stressing subs, and you might just be pushing the limits of your DefTech.
    M.
     
  3. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    agreed...

    u-571 is a bass-killer! you often hear it cited as the killer sub demo...i guess it has some extremely lfe's going on.

    if it sounds great with "normal" movies, and you've calibrated, then i think you're right where you need to be.

    nice setup btw...
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    (Note: there is a separate subwoofer fourm that might get you more focused answers)

    Where do you have your sub located? My guess is it is corner loading.

    Corner Loading allows the sub to reflect sounds off the adjcent walls using the entire length of both walls. This maximizes the lowest-possible reflection.

    This is great for most movies, but not so good for music as it's a bit "un-natural" or "over-emphasized".

    Try moving your sub in from the corner to about 2/5 ths or 1/3 of the way from the corner. This could help reduce some of the boom.

    Your next step is to consider buying a Bhering Feedback Destroyer which has become very popular to tame the boom from a sub for the 2 or 3 over-emphasized frequencies.
     
  5. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Ean

    First, welcome to the Forum!
     
  6. EanH

    EanH Auditioning

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    Thanks for the feedback everyone!

    My sub is positioned near my TV...about 3.5' from a corner, 8" or so out from the wall, sub facing the room. Would it be better to have the sub face a wall?

    Unfortunately, due to our room design it can't really go anywhere else unless I want to run speaker cable underneath the floor and put the sub behind the couch.

    thanks again,

    Ean
     
  7. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    You get the least amplification of the sub if you place it free standing in the middle of the room. Move it up to a wall and that wall will help amplify it. Move it to a corner and you have yet another wall helping you boost the signal further.

    No matter where you put it you will get some frequencies boosted due to the size of the room. Those can help make things sound boomy, if you have a multiple-db gain at some set frequency.

    If you do, your options would be extremely extensive room treatments (unpractical for most of us) or active equalization of the sub, which is what people tend to do.
     

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