Subwoofer Hookup Confusion

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by JesseA, Mar 4, 2002.

  1. JesseA

    JesseA Agent

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    I have the JBL NS-P1 speaker package and a JBL- PB10 sub. Currently I have one radio shack gold series AV cable going from the LFE on the sub to the sub output on my reciever. I know this is the correct setup when listening to DVDs but is this also the right config for just general music CDs. For some reason my DVD's sound incredible where as my music CD's just lack the umphh.
     
  2. Johnny Mac

    Johnny Mac Stunt Coordinator

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    Funny, Cause it's usually the other way around. When properly calibrated, you usually get more bass oomph from music CD's. I normally have to cut the sub -2 or so for music listening.

    Sounds to me like you may have the front speakers set to large. On my old Kenwood, the sub output was disabled for stereo playback if you had large selected.

    Set all speakers to small and sub to on and see if that helps.
     
  3. JesseA

    JesseA Agent

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    One more question while im at it. When listening to a CD it obviously doesn't have a mix for the LFE channel. Is the subwoofer still truely in LFE mode when playing a CD? If not what crossover does it use the one on the sub or the one on the reciever. Sorry if im not making sense im still trying to get the basics down.
     
  4. Johnny Mac

    Johnny Mac Stunt Coordinator

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    If you're using the LFE out on the reciever, then the recievers crossover is being used. Depending on the make, it can be anywhere from 80hz to 120hz. If you use this connection method, it is recommended that you turn the crossover on the sub all the way up to get it out of the picture.

    Otherwise, you will be doubling up on crossovers causing a very steep frequency rolloff. For insance, my reciever (Yamaha) has a crossover point of 90hz and rolls off at 18db/octave. My sub has a built in low-pass crossover that rolls off at 24db/octave. If I use the LFE out and the subs crossover, they both may come into play resulting in a very steep rolloff of 42db/octave. Think of it as the audio equivalent of gradually going down a hill or jumping off a cliff.

    It's best to rely on one or the other to get the best blend between your sub and your mains. You would use the subs crossover if you were running speaker level connections to the sub or if you used L/R pre outs.
     
  5. JesseA

    JesseA Agent

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    Thanks man, I cranked the crossover on the sub to max, and set the crossover on the reciever to 100, and now it sounds like the sub is truely holding it own.
     

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