Subwoofer Connection

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ryan Leemhuis, Nov 6, 2002.

  1. Ryan Leemhuis

    Ryan Leemhuis Second Unit

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    what does it mean for there to be a sub-woofer "pre-out"? Is this what the subwoofer should be connected to(on the receiver)?
     
  2. CaseyLS

    CaseyLS Second Unit

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    I believe so. Thats where mine is hooked up any way. Sounds alright also.
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Many people use a self-powered sub. This connection, also called the Low Frequency Effects (LFE) port, will carry the ".1" from a "5.1" soundtrack.

    It will also carry all lower-frequency sounds from any of the other speakers if you tell your receiver that the speakers are SMALL.

    With this type of hook-up, that one sub can take over the low-frequency duties of all 5 speakers.
     
  4. David Young

    David Young Extra

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    Yep, good ol' bass management. So simple to understand.

    To add an extra wrinkle. Having got two subs I experimented with turning the sub output off and connecting them to the front L/R pre-out instead (effectively turning the fronts to 2.5 way). It certainly works, though how well is somewhat moot.
     
  5. dougW

    dougW Stunt Coordinator

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    Not really so simple to understand if your a beginner at this. Explanations are how folks learn that don't know. [​IMG]
    Bob, great answer. To expand on that, the reason the bass goes from the speakers to the sub when speakers are set to small, which Bob obviously knows as well, is that the receiver or pre-pro's internal crossover subtracts all sound below a certain Hz level, typically 80 Hz, and redirects that sound to the LFE pre-out or Sub Out. Think of it as a mask that filters anything below a certain point, and then releases it into another output.
    Beginners should pay close attention to speaker and sub matching. Read your speaker manuals to see what Hz your speakers are capable of handling, and always set your pre-amp or receiver to redirect anything below that point to the sub. Pick the closeest setting above your speaker's low range. If you don't? You could certainly damage your speaker's low range driver at even moderately loud volumes.
    Lex
     
  6. Ralph P.

    Ralph P. Stunt Coordinator

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    Double post.
     
  7. Ralph P.

    Ralph P. Stunt Coordinator

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    Greetings,
    Ryan, to add to the very fine explanations given here, one more thing:
    You can connect your powered subwoofer to your receivers left/right speaker outputs ( provided your sub has speaker level connections, most do ) via the sub's speaker level inputs. This will allow you to utilize the subwoofer's internal crossover, which works very much the same as explained above. However, the optimum setup would be to utilize the receiver or pre/pro's subwoofer preouts. This offers more flexible bass management ( depending on the extent of your units crossover settings ), and of course a heck of a lot less cabling. I just wanted to add this so you knew there is another option.
    Good luck![​IMG]
     

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