Subwoofer connection questions - please help!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by bruin, Dec 1, 2002.

  1. bruin

    bruin Second Unit

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    I have connected my sub using RCA inputs to the sub out of my Harman Kardon 320 with a low pass filter of 60hz in the setup menu of the receiver.


    Now, for movies, my questions are:

    - should I turn the LFE switch on the sub to ON or OFF?
    - and how would turning the LFE Switch to On or Off affect how to adjust the crossover switch on the Sub (can be from 50-200hz)?

    For music:
    - would the above settings be different if I were to use the sub for music


    I guess I just don't understand what the LFE switch is for. I also read somewhere that if my sub didn't have the LFE switch then at some frequency point the output of my sub out would interfere with the sub's crossover setting. I hope I have the terminology correct.
     
  2. Matthew Anderson

    Matthew Anderson Second Unit

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    If I understand you correctly, turn the "LFE switch" to on and set the crossover on the sub to 60Hz or higher so it will not interfere with the crossover setting on your receiver.
     
  3. Scott Cunninghm

    Scott Cunninghm Stunt Coordinator

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    Make sure the LFE is set to on, otherwise the signal doesn't go to the subs.

    Based on what I (think) I know, the crossover knob determines what level of signal the sub gets. Most main speakers are good down to 60hz or so, the sub should get everything below that. Mess with it until it sounds good.

    There are 2 ways off hooking up the sub. The first is LFE out to the RCA plug on the back. I think this is specifically for LFE signal. The second way is to take the L and R main speaker leads (from the reciever) and run them to the L/R inputs of the sub, then hook the L/R main speakers to the L/R output of the sub.

    I have not heard if this is a better way to hook up or not.My concern is that on non 5.1 sources (like a standard music CD) there might not be a dedicated signal to send to the sub, so that sending 100% of the main signal to the sub and letting it sort things out might actually be better.

    Anyone able to give insight to this.

    In any case, try setting the main speakers to "small"(in the reciever's settings) , and seeing if it sounds better. Many report the mains work better when they don't have to bother with low freq signal.

    I will hopefully have my Hsu VTF-2 in this week. I will report on results as I test it out.
     
  4. bruin

    bruin Second Unit

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    Scott,

    I've tried doing the speaker level connections as you said but my mains, Klipsch RP3s have built in power subs as well.

    The mains also have LFE Inputs and Outputs. I tried using hooking up a preamp output off my receiver to the Line In on the RP3 but only bass information is played. So I have to use speaker wire. Why would there be a Line In and an LFE in? To me it's the same thing.

    Matt,

    I will try your suggestion. I also read on another home theater site that I could:
    - use my left and right preamp outputs to my sub
    - my RP3's being towers will be set to Large
    - Receiver setting should be NO Sub.

    This way, the article says, LFE info is sent to the fronts and in this connection my fronts would take some bass and my sub would also in music or movies. I have to try this out. I will let you guys know.


    I'm just trying to get a definitive answer from as many people as to which they prefer. I realize that whatever sounds good to me is ideal but I'd like to hear from as many of you as possible. Thanks for the replies!
     

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