Subwoofer cable?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by MarceloC, Nov 27, 2002.

  1. MarceloC

    MarceloC Auditioning

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Can I use regular speaker cable for the subwoofer? They come combined with positive and negative, can I just split it and use only one part? (I will need 42 feet of cable for the subwoofer because it will have to stay in the back with the surrounds)
    Thanks a lot! [​IMG]
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

    Joined:
    May 22, 1999
    Messages:
    5,182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello Marcelo. Welcome to HTF! [​IMG]
    You dont want to use speaker wire if you are sending LFE signals to a self-powered sub. The signals are weak, un-amplified, line-level signals. Using speaker wire will just give you a large 'antenna' feeding your sub.
    You can use ordinary CATV coax. Just go to Radio Shack and buy a 50' roll of coax with the "F" connectors already attached. Then buy 2 of the "F-to-RCA Male" adaptors. A minutes work and you have a long subwoofer cable. They may even have the coax in white to help blend it in.
    The CATV coax is stiff, ugly and hard to work with. Later, you can try one of the custom web sites that will build you a nice cable. But the CATV coax is a fine, and inexpensive solution for now.
    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Marcelo,

    As Bob touched on above- the typical A/V receiver has amplifiers built in only for the main speaker channels- and does not feature a built in amp for the sub. The receiver INSTEAD has a line level "pre-amp" output for subwoofer signal that needs to be amplified before being sent to a speaker.

    As a result- you need some sort of amplifier device between your receiver and your subwoofer. Some people choose to buy an "active" sub- which is essentially a subwoofer with an amplifier unit built into the same cabinet. An second option is to purchase a "passive" sub which has no built-in amp and purchase an amplifier to go with it.

    If you currently have an active sub (or buy and active sub)-- the only connection you need to worry about is going from the sub output on the receiver to the input on the subwoofer. This connection is typically a RCA-RCA connection- and as Bob mentioned- standard RG6 coax will work (as will any host of other audio cable solutions). You won't need speaker wire in the config, as the amp is built into the sub- so the speaker connection between the amp and the speaker is done internally for you.

    If you currently have a passive sub (or buy a passive sub)- then you have 2 connections. You still need the same connection between the receiver and the amplifier (again, the RG6 solution above would work here)-- but in this config you will also need some speaker wire to go from the amp output terminals to the sub speaker itself.


    But, again, bottom line is that the sub output on the receiver is RARELY an amplified output. You will need some sort of amplifier device between the receiver and the speaker- either built into the sub or an outboard unit.

    Hope that helps

    Vince
     
  4. MarceloC

    MarceloC Auditioning

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the great info!
    It seems that my subwoofer is an active sub. (It is the sub that comes with the Infinity Entra Point Five HTS). My receiver is a Denon 1803.
    The speakers are in the mail and UPS is supposed to deliver them today. I can't wait. :wink:
     

Share This Page