Sub Woofer Connections

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Chris*Size, Jan 5, 2004.

  1. Chris*Size

    Chris*Size Auditioning

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    I recently purchased a new receiver (Pioneer VSX-D812K) which instructs me to connect my sub to it at the connector labled "sub pre-out". Three questions for you:

    1) Do I need a specific kind of wire? I am using a single audio cable connected to the "mono" input on the sub right now.

    2) Did I hook this up correctly as there are other options on the back of the sub for a L&R audio connection it appears? Prior to this set-up I had the sub wired together with my front speakers as I had an old Dolby Pro-Logic receiver with no sub connections.

    3) When setting up the receiver there are different frequency settings that I can tinker with to determine when sounds will be sent to the sub. What is optimal? I have Paradigm Phantom fronts, Paradigm 10' sub, and Pardigm Dipole surrounds. I believe the receiver is defaulted to 100hz.


    Thanks for all of the help in advance. This is my first post on the forum as I am a brand new member.

    Chris
     
  2. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    That's fine. Any coax cable works fine, be it video, digital audio, analog audio, whatever.

    I'm not sure what options the the receiver has for crossover points, but start atoun 80hz, which is pretty standard, and play around and see what sounds best to you.
     
  3. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

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    Chris,

    Additionally, you would want to set the crossover on the back of the subwoofer to the highest position (e.g. 150 or 160 Hz.) This will prevent the subwoofer crossover from interfering with the crossover you designated on your receiver for the subwoofer.
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Wayne, you are 100% correct, but I was referring to the crossover on the receiver.
     
  5. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

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    Chris, I understood what you were stating. My reply was for the other Chris - who posted the questions. [​IMG]
     
  6. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Oh wow. Now I'm *REALLY* confused. [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I need to take a speed reading class. My method of speed readong by skipping every other word has it's drawbacks... [​IMG]
     
  7. Chris*Size

    Chris*Size Auditioning

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    Thanks for the help.

    One last thing here for clarification:

    The sub has three dials...Subwoofer Level, Subwoofer Cutoff Frequency and Sub/Sat Phase Alignment. I assume that the Subwoofer Level is a matter of taste as it is basically the volume control. I currently have both of the other two set to the lowest positions possible (50hz and 0 respectively) as I believe that is what the sales person had recommended that I do. Are you saying that I should set the Cutoff Frequency to 150hz or just the opposite of what I have it now? What would be the advantages of having it that way versus how I do now? Is it ok to have the Phase Alignment at 0? What does Phase Alignment do anyway?

    Chris
     
  8. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

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    The saleperson provided you with the wrong information. Setting the crossover @ 50 Hz on your sub itself means that you'll have a gap in the bass because the receiver is going to supply bass down to 80 Hz or so and then the subwoofer won't kick in until 50 Hz and supply the frequencies from 50 Hz and below. Set the crossover at the receiver level to 80 Hz as the other Chris indicated. Then, set the frequency crossover on the back of the sub to 150 Hz - or whatever your highest position is.

    The phase button is essentially one to get your subwoofer in synch with the sounds of your other speakers. A speaker out of phase means that the bass beats could be hitting out of tune. It's kind of hard to just set this by "ear." Calibration DVDs - which are created for setting up a system are pretty good at ironing out the phase issues for a typical system.

    The level or "volume" knob on the back of the sub is basically as you thought. It controls the output level of the sub. However, setting it to "what seems good" isn't the best answer either. It really seems that you should get some form of calibration disc to ensure the levels of your speakers are properly set. Doing so should dramatically improve the quality of sound for your system.

    Finally, there are many people here who have been doing system setups and tweaking for many years. I think most if not all will agree that they still can't set a system up by "ear" ... even after all these years. SPL meters and setup discs are pretty much a staple item for getting a system in "tune." [​IMG]
     
  9. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Yep, wayne's got it covered.

    You can also, temprorarily, use the test tones in your receiver's setup menu. However, I also recommend you use an SPL meter, not "by ear." It's quite difficult to judge bass as such.

    I also, STRONGLY recommend that you DO get a test disc like Avia, or DVE. Not only for audio test tones, which are more in-depth than those of your receiver, but also video. IMO, the video setup patterns are the MOST important and valuable, and DEFINITELY the best $30-50 you'll EVER spend on HT equipment. It's like buying a new TV.

    good luck! [​IMG]
     
  10. Chris*Size

    Chris*Size Auditioning

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    Thanks again!

    I think the sales guy was thinking that I could let my fronts handle all except the lowest frequency bass....which would then be routed to the sub by setting it at the 50hz level. I never thought about the gap that would be created between the 80hz and 50hz levels. So if I understand you correctly....setting the sub to 150hz doesn't mean that all signals from 150hz on down will be carried only by the sub. If the receiver is set to 80hz, then the sub will be sure to catch everything from 80hz on down....while the fronts will carry everything 80hz and above....is that right?

    I'll be sure to check out a calliberation disc. I was hoping to pick up Digital Video Essentials, but wasn't sure if it would be too advanced for me. Avia I hear is easier to understand w/menus etc. Would the Sound & Vision disc be ok too?

    Chris
     
  11. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Yep. The crossover in the receiver determines what goes where. Thus, you want to take the crossover in the sub out of the loop. Many subwoofer have a crossover on/off switch as well, in which case you'd want to turn it off (thus making sure that EVERYTHING the receiver sends to the sub is reproduced).

    However, many DONT have this switch (no biggie), so by turning it all the way UP, you essentially assure that everything sent to the sub by the receiver is reproduced.

    If you turned the crossover very low, then you would get gaps, since audio that is being sent to the sub (by the receiver) to be reproduced, is being thrown away by the crossover.

    As for DVE/Avia, I have avia, I find it quite useful. I will eventually be picking up DVE as well. I am unfamiliar with S&V, though if I recall, it's done by the same folks that did Avia? I think Avia/DVE are more complete. I am not particularly familiar with DVE, so I can't comment. I find that avia is relatively straightforward. However, it really helps going in with some knowledge, which im SURE you can get easily around here.

    There are just so many exceptions and ripples of complications to every possible HT issue, that it's very difficult to include thoroguh explanations of things. Avia does this pretty well, it covers the basics, and some of the differences, of say, display types, when calibrating. It mentions some of the reasons, but going into a thorough explanation of how everything works is overkill usually. Thus you can branch out a lot to fill in the details, which is good. The more advanced patterns (and even the basic patterns) can be used in lots of ways that can't (and aren't) be so thoroughly explained reasonably.

    As for things being "too advanced" I am sure both DVE and Avia cover similar things.

    Here, BTW, is a GREAT thread by Guy that covers everything Avia:

    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...threadid=28110

    Everyone can find useful info there. As well as tons that is over their head, or not applicable to them. But scan through, theres stuff for bass management, speaker setting, etc etc.

    [​IMG]
     

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