Sub Volume vs. Intenal Sub Setting

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chuck C, Nov 16, 2001.

  1. Chuck C

    Chuck C Cinematographer

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  2. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Supporting Actor

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    I can't see any reason why there would be a difference. In order not to overload anything, I would suggest neither extreme (ie. don't crank one and minimize the other). Somewhere in the middle for both.
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    Jeff
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    "They're coming to get you Barbara..."
     
  3. Jeffrey_Jones

    Jeffrey_Jones Second Unit

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    Hello,
    It seems to me that you would want to turn up the gain on the LFE output (not too far up) and leave the gain on the subwoofer lower. I could be wrong but it seems that this would reduce the strain on the sub's amp, allow for even more headroom on the sub's gain control, and reduce the chance of subwoofer hum.
    This is something that I would have to experiment with...but I don't have a sub.
    Am I way off base?
    - Jeff
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  4. John H

    John H Second Unit

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    Some receivers LFE/SUB preout will add distortion to the signal. It is best to set the LFE out in the setup menu in the negative range (about half of full negative and 0dB) and turn the gain up on the subwoofer amplifier itself.
    This topic has been discussed in detail in the past.
    John
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    Bedroom Based Theater
     
  5. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    "It seems to me that you would want to turn up the gain on the LFE output
    (not too far up) and leave the gain on the subwoofer lower. I could be wrong
    but it seems that this would reduce the strain on the sub's amp, allow for even
    more headroom on the sub's gain control, and reduce the chance of subwoofer
    hum."
    Jeff,
    Yes, this is correct. Using this method maximizes your signal to noise (S/N) ratio. The higher and cleaner your incoming signal the better. That's exactly why many car audio headunits have 4V preouts. It keeps you from having to bump the amps' gain way up. If you happen to have a weak signal it's much easier to inject noise into the signal path and therefore the entire signal (noise and all) will be "amplified" along with the headunit's output.
    Brian
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  6. jeff peterson

    jeff peterson Supporting Actor

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    This has been much discussed in the past. My memory says you set your sub's volume control to 3/4 of full. Something to do with the fact that you actually increase headroom by doing this as the volume control on the sub is really a limiter. You then fine tune your sub's output via the receiver's LFE settings.
    I also seem to remember that distortion is introduced if the reciever's LFE output is set too high.
    Hopefully, our resident sub experts will chime in here.
     
  7. Jeffrey_Jones

    Jeffrey_Jones Second Unit

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    Brian,
    This was my reasoning as well and I was thinking about my days in car audio when I submitted my comments.
    Assuming that you have a quality receiver, it still seems to make more sense to me that you would want to turn up the gain on the receiver to allow for more headroom from the amp. I really need to experiment with this as I imagine it's different with each configuration. Now I need a sub [​IMG]
    Thanks,
    Jeff
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