Sub problems when watching DVD

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by JoeC-M, Jun 2, 2005.

  1. JoeC-M

    JoeC-M Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am having problems with my sub getting some "distortion" with some voices on my movies. I have tried changing the crossover points, the volumes, etc but it's still there. I ultimately turned the sub down to the point where I can hardly hear it, but then the sub is not as efficient in the movie.... It is a POlk 10" sub from a Pioneer 5.1 DTS receiver, Pioneer Elite DVD (it doesn't seem to matter if its in DTS or just digital....) It doesn't seem to do it when I am watching SAT TV, just with the DVD....

    Any suggestions?????

    JM
     
  2. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,571
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John
    What model is the sub? Polk's subs are not the best out there, but they aren't garbage either. One of my subs is a PSW202 that isn't exactly impressive, but it adds decent support to about 30Hz, and I don't expect it to realistically handle much below that. Most of Polk's subs can't handle really low information (low 20s and below) and the lower the model of your sub, the more likely distortion is going to be when the sub tries to reproduce sound below it's range.

    It probably doesn't do it with a TV signal because TV signals are generally stereo or even Dolby Surround encoded, and don't carry a separate LFE track like DD/DTS movies do. DVDs may carry MUCH lower information.
     
  3. DanHal

    DanHal Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2004
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joe,

    You said that you are getting distortion with voices in some movies. I would expect most voices in movies to not be using much from the subwoofer. What do you have your crossover's set at? Are they set at the receiver, or on the sub?
     
  4. DavidCooper

    DavidCooper Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dan is right. You shouldn't be getting minimal if not NO information coming from the sub when people are talking in movies. I would hazard a guess that you are running your sub WAY too hot.

    It's distorting when the loud scenes play loud correct?

    That's a good indication you have it set too high. Check your sub settings and check where you have it's volume set and also check your sub setting on your receiver you might have it set too high as well. That would be a good start.
     
  5. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,571
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John
    Dan mentioned the x-over point, not the volume. If your sub's x-over is too high, it can cover part of the vocal range, most notably deep male voices. If the x-over is set too high, the sub may sound boomy.
     
  6. JoeC-M

    JoeC-M Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    The sub itself is the PSW350 and I have been impressed with it so far, other than this problem. The sub only has volume, low pass, and phase settings on it. The crossover is set with my receiver and I have tried 100, 150, and 200 and it doesn't really affect it. I like to leave it at 100. I have the volume down right now, and it does help, but he problem is still there. That's why I came here to see if you guys had some other suggestions of something that I might try.

    JM
     
  7. Aaron_Mum

    Aaron_Mum Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2003
    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    0
    Go through and doublecheck everything to make sure you are crossing over at your 100 setting, ie are your mains set to small? Still like John suggested it shouldn't distort, is should only sound boomy.

    I wonder if you blew the driver or something? Are you sure its the sub and not the mains? If you can borrow a reciever that would help locate where your problem is coming from.
     
  8. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,571
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John

    Not many subs will have more controls than that.

    Do you have it connected with speaker level or line level (RCA)? Where do you have it positioned in the room? What do you have the receiver's sub level at compared to the sub's gain (volume) level?
     
  9. JoeC-M

    JoeC-M Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    The sub is in the middle of the room just in front of my riser, behind my chair. I am using RCA line level into the LFE input on the sub. I am going to check my receiver settings tonight and make sure of some of this....

    Thanks for all the help and keep the suggestions coming!

    JM
     
  10. Brian Fellmeth

    Brian Fellmeth Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2000
    Messages:
    789
    Likes Received:
    0
    Please don't be insulted by this suggestion, but double check that the RCA line to the sub is the LFE out of the receiver and not a neighboring jack such as... center preout. Sometimes the labeling of the jacks is unclear or its easy to miss the target by one with so many jacks jammed together.
     
  11. BillyHC

    BillyHC Agent

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    did that once... my sub out was below the right-surround out and, when looking at the back of the receiver upside down and in not-too-good lighting, I had it on the wrong one. [​IMG]
     
  12. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,571
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John
    The sub is in the center of the room or the center of the room near a wall? In the center of the room is generally not a good location, as bass will tend to collect near the walls, rather than the center of the room. Try relocating the sub to a corner, preferably on the same wall as the front speakers, then recalibrate. A corner will give you much better reinforcement, so it is a good place to start usually.

    There is the "crawl" method also. Leave the sub where it is, and crawl around the room to (possible locations) see where the bass sounds the strongest - that is where you should try to locate your sub.
     
  13. Tim Hoover

    Tim Hoover Screenwriter

    Joined:
    May 27, 2001
    Messages:
    1,422
    Likes Received:
    0
    What is the sub's low-pass filter set at?
     
  14. JoeC-M

    JoeC-M Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think that I have it figured out.... The sub is on the wall in front of my riser. I have not had time to check the connection, but that is a good idea. Actually I read somewhere that the input level to the sub could be too hot, so I checked and it was set very high, so I lowered it for that channel and increased the volume on the sub itself. It sounds better on the Satelite, but I have not tried it on a DVD yet. I will try it this week and report back.

    Thanks for all the help. It really helps to brainstorm with you guys....
    JM
     
  15. John S

    John S Producer

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2003
    Messages:
    5,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    100hz is you lowest setting??? This taxes the sub pretty darn hard....

    Hard to believe you can't do 80hz, as that is considered standard. At 60hz the sub is entirely out of the vocal range at 80hz it is very close to being out of the vocal range. At 100hz, the sub is still very much in the low end of the vocal range.
     

Share This Page