Sub Port Plugging

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Paul Clarke, Jan 30, 2002.

  1. Paul Clarke

    Paul Clarke Supporting Actor

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    Hello all,

    I am a newbie so I definitely could use assistance. My question concerns the value/lack of value in plugging a ported sub. My current one is the down-firing JBL PB10. I have no need for anything larger as my home is small and there are neighbors on common walls, albeit concrete cinderblock firewalls at that.

    My living room is small and fairly filled with furniture. This has made placement of the sub somewhat of a problem. I have two options: place it on the tile hearth of the rarely used in-wall firebox or behind the left front speaker in the corner. Both positions are on the left side of the room.

    I currently have it in the latter position but I am trying to find a compromise solution as to any booming effects. The level is slightly less than 50% and is +3 on my receiver after AVIA calibration.The sub is sitting on an unused video cabinet for now as I don't have any marble yet and my townhouse has thick carpeting.

    I know that some ported subs are made with plugs and the sonic results can be quite different when utilized. Does anyone have any opinions on either the usefulness of doing so or on what kind of material works best for this application. TIA.

    P.S. My own limited experiments with various plugs has shown a tightening of all bass and a seeming increase in musicality...but thats just my ears.
     
  2. Jack Gilvey

    Jack Gilvey Producer

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    Port-plugging can work well if a sub is designed for this.

    In the case of multiple ports, plugging one will lower the tuning frequency, as is the case with the Hsu VTF-2 and the 3-port SVS models. The only single-ported subs I've seen

    that are designed for this are DIY designs, where the driver used will also perform well in a sealed loading.

    If you take a typical ported sub and just seal off the port, what you'll objectively achieve is a major reduction in the amount of deeper bass (given that the driver is specifically designed for ported apps), which is sometimes perceived as an increase in "tightness" or "musicality". All that matters, though, is whether you like it or not.
     
  3. Paul Clarke

    Paul Clarke Supporting Actor

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    Thanks Jack. That is pretty much what I thought but it's good to ask. There is definitely a loss of extension but that is kinda what I was seeking as the open port sound is great but I like my neighbors a lot and I have no option but to put the sub up against the common firewall. I think I should ask them to let me monitor some of my heavier bass sources from their side, just to be safe. Some loss of HT kick is acceptable to me in my present digs. Besides, I can always pull the plug.

    Just for the record, I use a rolled up towel for the port. I know it should be something like soft dense foam but I haven't gotten any yet.
     

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