sub enclosure lining materials

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by MichaelAngelo, Dec 9, 2002.

  1. MichaelAngelo

    MichaelAngelo Stunt Coordinator

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    I've been wondering about linings for sub enclosures. What exactly is the purpose of lining an enclosure? Is there an optimum material, or do layers of different material work better?

    Is the inside of the box supposed to absorb the back wave or slow it down?

    Consider:

    Wall of mdf, then balsa, then cork, then egg crate foam? Gradual absorption?

    Or a rough texture, say wall texture, or even stucco, Celluclay finished rough, or even sculpted with hills and valleys?

    Arrgh, hobbies'll drive ya bananas.....
     
  2. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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  3. Aaron_Smith

    Aaron_Smith Stunt Coordinator

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    Materials that you would apply to enclosure walls would serve to either damp or add mass to the vibrating surfaces (walls), diffuse the sound of the back wave, or absorb the sound of the back wave.
    Damping the walls would cause a faster energy decay on the vibrating surfaces; adding mass would lower their harmonic frequency. Diffusion (i.e. rough surfaces) is used to "scatter" sound waves and is useful in treating standing modes. Absorption converts the sound energy to heat, and the frequencies that are attenuated are dependent largely on the thickness of the material.
    Which methods you use would depend on which problem you are trying to solve. A random approach will probably lead to much work without much benefit.
     

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