Sub connections

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chris Jac, Jun 26, 2002.

  1. Chris Jac

    Chris Jac Auditioning

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    I have a sub out connection on my receiver that I use to hookup my (go figure) subwoofer. It is 1 plug coming out of the receiver and 1 plug going into the sub. My current sub cable is 20 ft long but not long enough. I want to move my sub behind my sofa but cannot find a sub cable long enough. I have heard that I can use coaxial as a sub cable and plan on running that through the attic to get my sub where I want it.

    I know there are several different types and ratings of coaxial cable so I would like to know what type I should be using to connect my sub. Also, do I just use 1 RCA connector on each end? Is there a coaxial to rca adapter?
     
  2. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Sure, you can buy standard RG6 coax (doesnt have to be "QS") to any length. If you find it at a A/V store that caters to installations, they'll finish it with F-Terminals. Then you add an F-to-RCA adapter at each end for less than $5. RS carries them.

    I've not "twisted" my own F-terminals nor spent the $50 or more for the proper splice tool and dies to DIY.

    edit: I looked at partsexpress, and see RG6-U is recommended for in-wall use to meet fire code.
     
  3. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    Chris,
    You are likely to see RG59 and RG6 coax cable at your local home depot. The RG6's conductor is thicker (thus capable of higher bandwidth) and is ideal for video applications. For audio purposes, either RG59 or RG6 is more than adequate. 'QS' or quad-shield coax is coax with additional shielding (foil & braided shield). This helps with rejecting noise (long wires act as antennas). As Bill mentioned, cable is rated for different purposes (in-wall, conduit, ground/burial, etc.). If you're putting it in a wall make sure it's rated for that usage!
    The F-connector / RCA adapter method is the least expensive. If you are interested in building your own custom cables, read about it here.
     

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