Stylized violence

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by CaseyLS, Nov 18, 2002.

  1. CaseyLS

    CaseyLS Second Unit

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    A couple of my friends and I were trying to figure out the definition of stylized violence the other day. All I could think of for an example was Jackie Chan type stuff. Is this even close to being correct?


    Thanks in advance, Casey
     
  2. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    Watch John Woo's Hardboiled, and get back to us, okay? [​IMG]
     
  3. Richard Kim

    Richard Kim Producer

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    According to the MPAA, Spider-Man is the very definition of "stylized violence." [​IMG]
     
  4. Aaron Silverman

    Aaron Silverman Executive Producer

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    Simply put, when we refer to something in a movie as "stylized", it means that the filmmaker has eschewed realism for an image that looks cool or conveys a particular mood or atmosphere.
    Some of the acrobatics in early John Woo films are great examples. For example, in The Killer, there's a scene early on where Chow Yun-Fat flips a card table with his foot, and a gun on the table flies up and into his hand so he can shoot a bad guy across the room who already has his gun out. (I may be remembering the details slightly off.) It's ridiculous, but in slow-motion it looks AWESOME!
    If you are into anime, just about EVERYTHING is "stylized". (With, of course, a few exceptions.) Especially the hair and eyes! [​IMG]
     
  5. Brook K

    Brook K Lead Actor

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    Or for a more "hands-on" kind of stylized violence, check out Takeshi Kitano - Fireworks, Violent Cop, Brother
     
  6. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    of course, just like everyone else...john woo immediately came to mind. however, i also include his other signature stuff part of the whole ensemble: the doves, the blazing-gun-in-each-hand thing, the slow-mo shots, etc.

    i suppose even the matrix camera-move-pivot-thing (bullet time?) can be considered stylized. it certainly defines that movie's signature style.

    it also seems that we're seeing a lot more stylized stuff because of computers. you know...stuff like following the path of bullets - using it's pov, following it into the body, explosions slowing down then quickly speeding up...stuff like that.

    i don't remember the exact sequence, but the bomb explosion from "swordfish" was really cool. it was pretty much all cgi, but it definitely looked neat.
     
  7. FredHD

    FredHD Stunt Coordinator

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    Uh, The Matrix
     
  8. Bill J

    Bill J Producer

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    I think Three Kings definitely has stylized violence.
     
  9. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    There have been numerous mentions of John Woo (and Jackie Chan). Not too surprising as I consider that a good many Hong Kong films are filled with stylized violence. Then of course that was Bruce Lee.

    Lee Ang’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is an homage to a whole genre of films that have stylized violence at their core. I’d say that the same is true of most Samurai films. I consider them to be the epitome of ‘stylized violence’.
     
  10. Andy Sheets

    Andy Sheets Cinematographer

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    I consider pretty much any depiction of violence that isn't seriously aspiring to realism to be stylized. Like in many films where a character gets a hole blown in his/her arm or leg only to shrug it off with an "eh, it's not bad," or all the movies in which characters never have to reload their guns (John Woo would definitely fit [​IMG]). Basically, I think there are very few violent movies that don't contain stylized violence [​IMG]
     
  11. Terry St

    Terry St Second Unit

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    The duel at the end of Sanjuro.
     
  12. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    have a look at John Woo's A Better Tomorrow 1 & 2 as well. in particular, in part 2, there's an incredibly bloody shoot-out at the end, with the three "heroes" all hit multiple times and bloody all over, yet right at the end they're sitting in three sofas looking somewhat worse for wear (and bloody of course) but still alive. whilst bad guys die with a single hit...
     
  13. CaseyLS

    CaseyLS Second Unit

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  14. Brook K

    Brook K Lead Actor

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    And what John Woo movies are you watching, because they do reload their guns (not often, but it happens as much as in most other action movies), or usually, just pull out another one.
     
  15. Brian Kidd

    Brian Kidd Screenwriter
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    EL MARIACHI and DESPERADO.
     
  16. Andy Olivera

    Andy Olivera Screenwriter

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    Outside of the action genre, check out anything by Dario Argento. The murder at the beginning of Suspiria is one of the best examples of stylized violence, ever...
     
  17. Patrick Larkin

    Patrick Larkin Screenwriter

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    No one has mentioned A Clockwork Orange? Ultraviolence and Beethoven. Kubrick used stylized violence to make truly heinous acts watchable. It also offered a glimpse into Alex's perspective.
     
  18. Dwayne

    Dwayne Supporting Actor

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    Two other examples:

    The finale of the Godfather.

    The famous shot in The French Connection.

    Although these examples are quite different than what's been discussed so far, I would consider them stylized in their own right.
     

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