Still confused after reading faq reg aspect ratio .Need help.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jacqueline C, Mar 2, 2003.

  1. Jacqueline C

    Jacqueline C Agent

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    My tv is a HDTV despite that it is apparently 4:3 aspect ration. (The actual measured screen is 29inches wide and 22 inches high). I gathered from the threads that this is unusual as most HDTV's are widescreen. My question is, given my situation, when I connect my progressive scan dvd, what type of dvd's should I be buying. After reading the threads I kind of understand the concept that the better thing from a movie buff's POV is to have everything the director wanted on screen, on screen. That makes sense, so I understand that I should be seeing black bars on the top and bottom to make the picture rectangular BUT here is where I'm confused...if I had a rectangular screen I'd just buy Wide Screen dvd's wherever possible...fine. But since I don't have a rectangular screen and there is this whole thing about scan lines being squeezed in or out and the picture being affected by the formatting and reformatting vs not wanting the sides cropped so that the picture is square, should I buy Full Screen so that the picture quality stays in keeping with my HDTV or do I buy WS and will the picture still be HD? The dvd player is an Onkyo DV SP300.

    Thanks and I ask for your patience.
     
  2. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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  3. Jacqueline C

    Jacqueline C Agent

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    I was concerned because the Primer goes into something about how when the format has to be reformatted to go to widescreen, it has to take lines of info OUT and the pic can suffer and that is where I got lost. It made it sound like if I bought a widescreen dvd and my dvd tried to letterbox it as it were, that I'd get a bad picture. THat may not be what they meant but that is what it sounded like to me. This is the part of the Primer that confused me

    "When an anamorphic DVD is played back, obviously the image needs to be restored to it's correct proportions. There are three ways this can be done.

    On a standard 4:3 TV, the 'squeeze trick' can be done. This consists of entering the service mode and reducing the vertical size of the viewable picture until the proportions are correct. You're basically doing the same adjustment that's possible on computer monitors. On most European and very few American TVs, there is a proper '16:9' mode which does the squeeze trick at the touch of a button.

    On a 4:3 TV without doing the 'squeeze', the DVD player must be set to '4:3' within it's setup menu. This forces the player to 'downconvert' the anamorphic image by removing some of the scan lines. This plays the image back at the correct proportion, but obviously loses some of the original resolution. It can also introduce unwanted artifacts, especially on scrolling credits etc.

    On a widescreen TV, if the correct screen mode is used, the anamorphic image is stretched laterally, restoring it to the correct proportions. "


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  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Video picture information can be stretched to any shape within the limits of the TV set controls.

    When an anamorphic DVD is played, the video picture with 480 visible scan lines that the player delivers should be stretched to a 16:9 shape. (Note: if the movie aspect ratio is greater than 16:9, the 16:9 picture we are referring to will include some black at the top and bottom, pre-recorded on the disk).

    By doing the squeeze trick on a 4:3 TV, the 16:9 shape is achieved without removing any scan lines from the video picture.

    If the squeeze trick cannot be done, the 480 visible scan lines are spread evenly over a 4:3 shaped area and fixed that way. The video picture must be altered to occupy the middle 360 scan lines in order to achieve the 16:9 shape. This is where the player has to remove some scan lines here and there from the picture and add some (or more) black lines on top and on the bottom.

    On a 16:9 TV, the picture stretched to fill the screen will be in the proper shape without removal of any scan lines of picture information.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  5. Olly Dean

    Olly Dean HW Reviewer
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    Whether your TV is 4:3 or 16:9 you should always go for the widescreen version. It's not worth losing half the picture on the sides and you won't lose any information by watching a widescreen DVD on a 4:3 TV.

    If you ever have to buy a new HDTV make sure it's 16:9 though. HD broadcasts are widescreen and your widescreen DVDs will obviously look much better.
     
  6. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    oh, i see what you're asking now. you're concerned about the quality of the picture, not why you should choose widescreen.

    in any case, allan nailed it...which is good cuz i still don't even get how it really works. [​IMG]
     

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