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Stereo Receiver with Sub Capabilities (1 Viewer)

Matthew Will

Stunt Coordinator
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Jan 6, 2002
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168
Hello,
Blah blah blah im building an electronic drumset and I will need to play it through a stereo of some sort. Id like to use the Adire audio HE10.1 monitor kits and also hook up a 15" tempest to the system. Do I need to buy a surround receiver so it works with subs or are there stereo receivers that do have sub capabilities? Matt
 

Matthew Will

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Jan 6, 2002
Messages
168
Oh and just so you know, I am a newbie so right now I haven't considered using an amp or preamp because for one, I couldnt tell you the difference between the two. This is probably a better option for me for this but how would that work? Im just trying to throw some things out there so I can have as many options to power these speakers as possible. Matt
 

Martice

Screenwriter
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Jan 20, 2001
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Hi Matthew, you won't need a surround receiver because the sub output on the HT receivers are for LFE (Low frequency effects) which is information encoded on DVD discs. LFE is not the same as the bass content that you'll be using your drumset for. That said, all you need to do is run your speaker cables OUT from your speakers to the "high level filter inputs" (they look like speaker terminals on the back of your Plate Amp)and eventually out from your sub to the back of your stereo receiver. This will allow your speakers signal to pass through the subs crossover so that you can create a seamless blend between the speakers and the sub. Depending on your speaker and how low it is tuned will determine where you should START looking for a good crossover point. Let your ears be the final judge on this one.

Once you've connected the speakers cables coming from your speakers to the "high pass inputs" located on the rear of the sub, you then hook up and additional pair of speaker cables on the remaining speaker terminals located on the rear of the sub and these cables will go out from the sub to the receiver's speaker terminals for normal hookup.

So in short, you run your speaker cables from the speakers to the high pass input terminals located on the rear of the sub's plate amp. You then run a new set of cables out from the bottom set of terminals from the sub's plate amp to your receivers speaker terminal.

I hope I didn't confuse you and if you'd like a better photo of the high pass speaker terminals, when you hit the above "Plate Amp" link, look for another link that says "More Images" and this will give you a close up of the high pass input terminals.

Good Luck
 

John A. Casler

Second Unit
Joined
Apr 29, 1999
Messages
475
I think the Harman Kardon Stereo Receivers have "sub Out" jacks.

Just use the crossover in the sub plate amp.

Regards
 

Craig_Kg

Supporting Actor
Joined
Feb 25, 2002
Messages
768
you won't need a surround receiver because the sub output on the HT receivers are for LFE (Low frequency effects) which is information encoded on DVD discs.
If you use bass management, then the redirected bass goes to this output. This has the added benefit of reducing the amount of power the amp needs to output.
 

Martice

Screenwriter
Joined
Jan 20, 2001
Messages
1,077
If you use bass management, then the redirected bass goes to this output. This has the added benefit of reducing the amount of power the amp needs to output.
Hello Craig, You are right about the redirected bass switch. However, are we talking bass management (so all speakers can manage during playback) or variable crossover switch (ability to select a proper frequency for a seamless integration of multiple speakers?)

Since we are talking music with a musician, I think having as much crossover flexibility is the best that we can offer him and depending on his budget, the crossover 'switch' in most surround receivers cannot touch the 'variable' crossover on the rear of the sub when applied as I suggested above. He would have to pay a pretty penny to purchase a solidly built receiver with a variable bass management feature to boot. In fact, his money would be better spent if he brought himself a very good pro amplifier (QSC RMX850 for about $200)and a Behringer mixer($160 new)and used the high pass inputs on the sub to take advantage of the much more flexible crossover section offered with the sub plate amp. He will have all of his bases covered by not only having superior power with the pro amp but also having flexible crossover selections, eq'ing and extra input channels in case some friends want to come over and jam with him.

Why have two crossovers in the same signal path and why waste one unless it's absolutely necessary?

Also, since he is a musician and things like this are mostly done by ear, it would be sad if he had to limit himself to a pre selected crossover point of 120hz and not have the luxury anf flexibility of adjusting his crossover by ear and on the fly.
 

SvenS

Second Unit
Joined
May 5, 2002
Messages
257
To run the stereo output from a stereo receiver through the sub then to the speakers you DO NOT run wire from the speaker to the inputs on the sub! You run the stereo speaker output of the receiver to the sub's high level inputs on the sub then run wires from the outputs of the sub to the speakers themselves. If you ran the inputs of the sub out to the speakers you would get NO SOUND because the speakers are sending out a signal but the receiver is!
 

Marc H

Second Unit
Joined
Aug 22, 2001
Messages
497
John is right, the two latest models of H/K stereo receivers both have a sub output. HK3375 and HK3475.

I like Sven's idea of using high level in and out on the sub though as most subs have an 80hz high pass filter on the high level output. That would protect the speakers from the heavy duty bass and ease the load on the receiver a bit to give a bit more headroom.
 

Craig_Kg

Supporting Actor
Joined
Feb 25, 2002
Messages
768
I like Sven's idea of using high level in and out on the sub though as most subs have an 80hz high pass filter on the high level output. That would protect the speakers from the heavy duty bass and ease the load on the receiver a bit to give a bit more headroom.
I'm not sure about this. It is basically what some people would call "fool's biamping" (a term I object to) where the current load is reduced but the voltage requirements stay the same - it helps reduce the likelyhood of power supply sag but the rail voltage limitations of the amp is unchanged.

He could also try an ICBM.
 

Matthew Will

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Jan 6, 2002
Messages
168
Intercontinental ballistic missle? I'm still gettign my feet wet in home theater so full explanations are very welcome.

It would be great if I could avoid the external amplifier and mixer route since I have a Sony Stereo receiver I bought about a year ago, but since Im upgrading my home theater to surround I can use it for this project. Is the plate amp connection idea still supreme? Matt
 

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