Stephen King's 'Desperation', anyone catch this?

Discussion in 'TV Shows' started by Inspector Hammer!, May 23, 2006.

  1. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    I loved it, Ron Pearlman was one sadistic son of a bitch in this! [​IMG]

    These Stephen King made for tv movies have a pretty good track record with me so far, i've either loved or liked all of them. I also laughed at one point because I realized where I had seen that kid before, he played the kid who was obsessed with Rachel Hunter in the 'Fountains of Wayne' video for 'Stacy's Mom' lol.
     
  2. Greg_S_H

    Greg_S_H Executive Producer

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    I've been a King fan since I was 9-years-old, but I didn't even bother. I didn't think much of the novel--I'll grant that it was much better than the companion novel, the Regulators--and I didn't like what I read about this movie's screenplay in my local paper's review.

    For the record, I do like many of the King TV adaptations. I thought The Shining was great, though I'm definitely in the minority there.

    Tak!
     
  3. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    The Shining was one of the one's that I merely liked, so your not alone.
     
  4. Greg_S_H

    Greg_S_H Executive Producer

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    BTW, I probably should have just let someone who had seen the show respond. I feel like I'm disagreeing with you a lot the last couple of days, and I usually agree with you. That's not a problem, since we all have our own tastes, but I don't want to piss you off with it. [​IMG]

    Still haven't seen the Stand. I've always wanted to.
     
  5. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    Greg, you could never piss me off, different strokes, man, different strokes. [​IMG] No worries. [​IMG]

    You should definitely see the The Stand, it's long but it's really well done IMO, especially when the flu is decimating the world.
     
  6. Lou Sytsma

    Lou Sytsma Producer

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    Yeah The Stand overall is well done. Did not like the choice of actor for Flagg though. I did love the opening with the playing of Don't Fear the Reaper.

    I taped Desperation and won't get to it until later this week. Fifty minutes of commercials, Dear Lord. Really looking forward to this as I have heard, and John confirms, Perlman rules in his part. Can't wait for the DVD.

    Tonight I'll be engrossed in the LOST season finale.
     
  7. Ric Easton

    Ric Easton Cinematographer

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    I thought they did a good job with the book. Perlman was great as the sadistic sherriff. My main complaint was in presentation.

    I was watching this on the local ABC-HD channel, and not only wasn't this in widescreen, the picture quality was very grainy and just plain bad. Unless this was just someone at my local affiltiate screwing up and not turning on the HD signal (wouldn't be the first time), I gotta give ABC thumbs down for this one.

    Can anyone in another HD market confirm that this was 4x3?
     
  8. Jon Bell

    Jon Bell Stunt Coordinator

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    I recorded it, but I haven't watched it yet.

    I've been lukewarm about the made for TV adaptations for the most part. King's campy writing style usually doesn't translate well (to TV or movies)when they try to do a "faithful" adaptation of the story (i.e., the TV version of The Shining, It, Langoliers), but when the story is expanded, or at least is not a slave to the original work (i.e., movie version of Shining, Shawshank, Stand by Me), it can really succeed. Two notable exceptions are The Stand and Salem's Lot, which are great made for TV adaptations that stay pretty close to the books.
     
  9. Wayne W

    Wayne W Stunt Coordinator

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    What market are you in?

    I can confirm a bad non-HD broadcast in Dallas. I have it TiVo'd, but I'm not sure if I'll watch it.
     
  10. Ric Easton

    Ric Easton Cinematographer

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    Albany, NY. I was pretty shocked since I can't remember the last time ABC had a new primetime drama that didn't look great on our HD channel. I wonder if it was the director's choice not to shoot in widescreen. I think it was the same guy that did The Stand and possibly Storm of the Century. Just seems pretty odd to me.
     
  11. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    It was not HD here in Fresno, either. It was SD, upconverted by ABC, and not even a good upconvert as most of the SD stuff on the ABC-HD feed looks a lot better.

    It was made by Mick Garris, who did do The Stand and most of the other SK tv adaptations--King really likes this guy. I don't know if it was shot for widescreen or not. I have several of the King tv adaptations on dvd, two of which are widescreen (The Shining and It) and the rest 4/3.
     
  12. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    Steve, you may or may not be aware that It isn't supposed to be in widescreen, that one was shot and composed for 4x3 and intended to be seen that way, this lack of OAR is why I don't own that one.

    Shame too, I love It.
     
  13. Dave Mack

    Dave Mack Producer

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    No HD here, Berk, CA
    DEF. looked like upconverted SD

    and I LOVED Storm of the century...

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Hugh Jackes

    Hugh Jackes Supporting Actor

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    "shot and composed for 4x3 and intended to be seen that way, this lack of OAR is why I don't own that one"

    If it was composed and shot at 4:3, then that is its Original Aspect Ratio.
     
  15. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    I know, which is why I said that the dvd presents the film incorrectly. 1.78:1 isn't it's OAR, 1.33:1 is. I don't own it because it's 1.78:1.
     
  16. Rex Bachmann

    Rex Bachmann Screenwriter

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    Steven King's Desperation

    I "caught" this. I thought I'd take a chance on it and [sigh] it turned out to be just more kitschy mishmash from Stephen King.

    "kid-centricity": with a kid who sees all and knows all (à la the kid in The Shining).

    David Carver, the "pray boy", spouts pronouncements about "God's will" (e.g., about bringing all the characters there in the first place): "God is love ... God is sort of everything. That's what makes him God."

    "To love God and serve him," adds his dead sister, Pie.

    I like some mystery, too, but the nature of the villain here is, as usual for King's stuff, way too amorphous. One always gets the feeling that some huge (and necessary) explanatory piece has been left out of the film translation.

    Pirin Moh ('the well of the worlds'), the home of Tak, the "heart of the unformed" in the mine depths. Is this supposed to reflect some kind of Chinese mythology? Who the hell is Tak, and why ever should I take him/her/it seriously? (Yes, yes, I know I could look it up, but, honestly, the film doesn't inspire me with enough interest to do so.)

    "Tak! Tak a lah! Tak a wah!" What does it all mean?!?

    (Needless to say, one oughtn't need to have to read the literary source material to get the meaning of a derivative film. The latter should be a free-standing whole.)

    What, if anything, is Stephen King trying to say in his writings? Based on the filmed versions of his stories and the usually gargantuan lengths of the source material, I have no interest (or time) to read his stuff directly, so I'll never know.

    Is there a message---an overall theme---at all in King's (supernatural horror) works? All of the filmed versions of his "scare" stories that I've seen don't seem to really have anything to say, and aren't at all scary, as far as I'm concerned (well, except for The Night Flier, which I like pretty well).
     

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