Star Trek Voyager - A Thread for Fans

Josh Steinberg

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I agree, Jeri Ryan was so much better in the role than her costumers gave her credit for.

I don’t remember if her addition to the cast boosted the ratings, but ironically for me at least, the catsuits have zero appeal to me. She’s a talented actress giving a fantastic performance that makes the unreal credible, and I didn’t need the show’s sledgehammer hitting the point home that she looks nice too.
 
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The Obsolete Man

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I agree, Jeri Ryan was so much better in the role than her costumers gave her credit for.

I don’t remember if her addition to the cast boosted the ratings, but ironically for me at least, the catsuits have zero appeal to me. She’s a talented actress giving a fantastic performance that makes the unreal credible, and I didn’t need the show’s sledgehammer hitting the point home that she looks nice too.
And they did it again with T'Pol in Enterprise. But by then they had added the blatant decontamination scenes so you could see Vulcan nipples are as pointy as their ears.

Oddly enough, even when I was a teenager during first run airings and appreciated the catsuits much more than I do now, I always think they all looked better in standard uniforms. Troi, Kira, Seven, T'Pol... better in Starfleet uniforms than catsuits.
 

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I believe you skipped over one of her best performances, which was S7's Body and Soul.

She does a spot-on impression of Robert Picardo as The Doctor for about half the episode that leaves you thinking "...and they used her as basically tits and ass all these years? WHY?!?"
IMHO, it's because the "suits" felt ratings weren't good enough and the show needed something to draw a younger audience. The answer? A Borg with T&A appeal.

I can hear the "brainstorming" session: "Everyone loves the Borg (I do not) and you can't go wrong throwing a bit of T&A around (yes, you can). Let's get a hot actress, put her in a tight suit, and make her a recovering Borg! That'll boost ratings!" And it did - ratings went up by ~60% that season. IMHO, story quality went down for a while as the main story focus became her while other cast members were ignored.

On her presence on the show...
Ryan maintained that the main topic about Seven was "humanity" and stated that her character was pivotal to the success of the show, because she "brought conflict to the show, which it was sadly lacking.
I mostly disagree. There was conflict before her arrival and her character was not "pivotal to the success of the show." The writers apparently didn't know how to manage or write to the conflict, or characters, they'd previously introduced. They became sloppy. Because of this, ratings had begun to suffer. The character *did* show the struggle for "humanity" but it took the writers time to realize this and begin to write to those strengths.

Ryan did a good job with what she was given and they eventually managed to figure out what her character needed to be and better integrated her into the series. I feel the first couple of seasons she was aboard, her parts were little more than T&A/Borg driven and that the show would have been better without the change had the writers gotten out of their rut and written to the strengths of the other main characters. That the writing for the series somewhat improved following her introduction tells me they had to do something to prove her addition was for more than T&A and ratings.

Outside the "need" for T&A I could see no reason she wasn't put in a regulation uniform or other, more suitable, clothing. That somewhat happened in the last 2 seasons but her costumes were still mostly T&A driven.

And the writers rarely used her "human" name, continuing to call her "Seven of Nine," and she never lost that one appendage over her eye to ensure viewers wouldn't forget she was once a Borg.

In spite of my overall feelings about the character, Voyager remains my 3rd favorite Trek series following TOS and DS9.
 
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Osato

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Love voyager. I think aside from tos it’s my most watched Star Trek series.

I am watching ds9 for the second time all the way through though.

voyager has some great moments and seven of nine made the show so much.

There’s a wrath of khan viewing party tonight. I can’t wait to see that. Hosted by paramount and inglorious treksperts. It should be great.


 

Adam Lenhardt

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Tonight I watched:
  • "Q2": This concept was done better on the original series with "The Squire of Gothos". As a whole, with the exception of "Death Wish", I've found the "Voyager" Q episodes less effective than the TNG Q episodes. For one thing, Q's lecherous behavior toward Janeway is offputting. But my main issue is the stories this show chose to tell with the character. The John de Lancie Q acts like an imp, but it's just that -- an act. Sometimes it feels like "Voyager" forgot that. On TNG, every interaction Q had with Picard was a test or a lesson -- with Picard standing in as the proxy for all of humanity. On "Voyager," Q and Janeway relate to each other much more as equals. Q lets her see behind the curtain in a way he rarely did with Picard. It saps the character of a lot of his danger and intrigue. As for Junior, casting the real-life son of de Lancie was a cute touch, and he does fine (being appropriately obnoxious) in the role. But again, it just feels very derivative. At the end of the episode, as a reward for putting up with Junior, Q gives Janeway information that will shave a few years off of the journey home. I wish there had been more specificity on what that information entailed.

  • "Author, Author": I liked this episode a lot. It's a story that couldn't have been told any sooner, for a couple reasons. First, Voyager needed to have regular contact with Starfleet. Before "Pathfinder", Voyager was essentially its own Federation onto itself. It didn't have any impact on events in the Alpha Quadrant, and the Alpha Quadrant didn't have any impact on events aboard Voyager. With eleven minutes of daily communication, there is no longer that separation. Second, the Doctor's program needed to become sophisticated enough, and the character needed to be developed enough, that the audience would side with the Doctor's personhood. We needed to go on this journey with the character to differentiate him from any other NPC on the holodeck.

  • "Friendship One": This episode works as both a really strong standalone story and a template for what could have been if the show had been more willing to shake up its status quo in the final season. On the episodic front: It's easy to view the Prime Directive as a Cold War relic borne out of unease with American intervention in the then-ongoing Vietnam War, one that has since been used as plot device to introduce contrived obstacles to problems that otherwise wouldn't require a full hour (less commercials) to solve. But the planet featured in this episode is a stark reminder why the Prime Directive exists: Humanity's desire to share its knowledge and experience throughout the cosmos led this pre-warp civilization to a devastating planet-wide calamity. It's more than a bit of a contrivance that they've been within a day or two of an M-class planet for nearly the entire series, but now when the locals are looking to be relocated the nearest one is over two months away. But otherwise, it's a really well-executed meditation on unintended consequences. And poor Lt. Carey: Passed over for chief engineer, and then redshirted on the home stretch. Within the wider framework of the series: If the show had established regular communication with Starfleet earlier, perhaps at the end of the sixth season, the show could have told a lot of interesting stories where Starfleet sends Voyager on missions no other ship can attempt due to its unique circumstances. This was a good one, but there's only a handful of episodes left. It feels like the show could have done more with the concept.
 
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Edwin-S

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Voyager was better than a lot of people gave it credit for. It reminded me more of the original series in structure. The series that was overrated was ST:TNG. Never saw why that series appealed to fans. It was dull and they always managed to wreck even an interesting storyline. The focus on Data and his "growth" was over used. The over reliance on holodeck malfunctions got tired too. Why anyone would want to use an "entertainment" device that could malfunction and kill you at any time was beyond me.
 
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Adam Lenhardt

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I finished things up today by watching the following:
  • "Homestead": This episode featured exactly the kind of big swing a final season episode should take, but that the final season of "Voyager" too rarely risked. For everybody else on Voyager, the journey to Earth is a journey home. Getting back to Earth means getting back to their lives. But for Neelix, the Delta Quadrant is home. Going to Earth would have meant leaving behind everything he knew, and everyone he knew aside from the Voyager crew. So the colony of Talaxians provided a unique dilemma for Neelix: He had to either leave his people behind, or he had to leave his Voyager family behind. One thing that Raf Green's teleplay does very perceptively, and that LeVar Burton's direction is particularly attuned to, is that Neelix's decision ultimately comes down to the children. His bond with Brax was initially got him emotionally invested in the colony and its plight. But he considers Naomi Wildman family. The deciding factor is ultimately that Brax is younger than Naomi and needs him more than Naomi does. It helps that Scarlett Pomers was playing younger than her age when she was first cast but, at probably 12 or 13 by the time this episode was shot, was starting to look quite a bit older. Unlike most child actors who age faster than their characters, "Voyager" had a built-in explanation since Naomi's hybrid physiology caused her to develop faster than purely human children would. And Pomers played Naomi older in this episode, which really helped sell it. In terms of the conflict itself, it was a pretty standard-issue (for Star Trek) critique of free market capitalism run amok. I was perplexed by all of the talk about Voyager's intervention violating the Prime Directive since both species seemed to be warp-capable. The asteroid itself, while less hospitable than an M-class planet would be, is much cooler. Neelix's final scene on Voyager, with the crew standing at attention along the sides of the corridors, was really emotionally powerful -- As was Tuvok's little jig. The relationship between Neelix and "Mr. Vulcan" was one of the more complex and nuanced on the show. This episode really paid that off beautifully. It would be neat if "Picard" or another series set in the early 25th century did a follow-up with Ambassador Neelix and gave us a glimpse of relations between the Federation and the Delta Quadrant a few decades on.

  • "Renaissance Man": This would have been a perfectly adequate episode in season five or season six. As the penultimate story for the entire series, it's infuriating. First of all, Janeway and the Doctor are en route to a medical symposium when the captain gets captured. I could buy Dr. Crusher being en route to a medical symposium, but Voyager is 30,000 light years from the Federation in an area of space full of strangers, more hostile than friendly. It's just too cozy of a scenario for this show. Then there's the fact that the Doctor leaves Voyager dead in the water to save the captain, but the two extortionists simply aren't enough of a threat to provoke such an extreme response. But my main problem is that the episode ends with the status quo being pretty much the same as it's been. The show is heading into the two-part finale with a little less than half of the journey home left to go. That's inexcusable.

  • "Endgame" (two-parter): An extremely frustrating series finale. It opens strong, with a sequence of events set in 2404. Aesthetically, this future is very similar to the future from the TNG finale. We find the crew in bittersweet circumstances, much like we find the various characters in "Picard". But unlike "Picard", none of this is going to stick. Instead, the writers are going to have Admiral Janeway shake the etch-a-sketch. Nothing that happens after Admiral Janeway arrives in 2378 feels earned. The Borg are crippled, and Voyager makes it home and the only cost for all of this is a version of Janeway that will never exist because of her own manipulation of the timeline. Other than Captain Janeway pushing back against Admiral Janeway and pursuading her to take a riskier course of action, the characters we've been following for seven seasons lack agency in own salvation. They use magical technology from the future and follow instructions from Admiral Janeway, and everything goes according to plan. It was nice to have Alice Krige back as the Borg Queen, but her only real role in the finale is to be duped by Admiral Janeway. Even the character stuff doesn't work very well. The romance between Chakotay and Seven of Nine comes out of nowhere, and because there wasn't any groundwork laid for it, it doesn't have an impact. The birth of Miral Paris, which is the culmination of a season's worth of stories, happens offscreen with Tom not present. There is an emphasis on spectacle at the expense of character and story. In particular: At the expense of resolution. They make it to Earth, cut to credits. No reunions with family members, no glimpse into what the future held for each of them. No emotional payoff for finally achieving the goal that has driven them all series long.
Final Thoughts:
I have really enjoyed revisiting this series while in quarantine. It held up surprisingly well a couple decades on, and was at times more satisfying than I remembered it being the first time around. I have two real issues with the show:
  1. There should have been more consequences for being alone in a distant, unexplored, and often hostile corner of the galaxy with no support and no means of obtaining new crew or supplies. The journey should have been harder for Voyager, and their encounters with new species and new technology should have had a bigger impact on Voyager itself. I wanted to see more MacGuyver-esque improvization, and less of the same thing we could expect from any other Starfleet vessel on any other Star Trek show.

  2. The ending was mishandled. Other than ditching Neelix in "Homestead", there is very little that happens prior to "Endgame" that shapes the final outcome of the series. Instead of having future Janeway arrive with a magic wand to wisk Voyager home, the entire seventh season should have been about accomplishing the task. They should have identified a means to get home, but a means that requires acquiring supplies that Voyager doesn't have and making scientific and technological innovations in order to pull off. And then the season should have been about accomplishing all of the component tasks to accomplish the larger goal. I would have actually liked them to make it home in the second to last episode, and then use the finale to explore what happens to the various characters once they're back.
But even with those issues, I'm glad I took this journey with the show. The concept driving the show was a strong one, and the cast of characters were enjoyable, with a bridge crew that was a happy medium between the roguish adventurers of the Kirk Enterprise and the cerebral and by-the-book professionals of the Picard Enterprise. I hope someday ViacomCBS goes back and invests the money and resources to give the show an HD refresh the way it did with TNG. The limitations of a 480i presentation sourced from analog video tape were the primary downside of the show's age. While the digital effects improved steadily as the seasons wore on, recreating them using modern technology would be a leaps and bounds improvement, especially for the first few seasons.
 

KPmusmag

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Dang it, Adam, I feel quite wistful over the fact that you have completed your Voyager journey. I have truly and sincerely enjoyed these posts and I will miss them now that they are done. Thanks to you, I revisited many episodes that I hadn't thought of in a long time. It was really special to be along on your ride.
 

Dave Upton

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I finished things up today by watching the following:
  • "Homestead": This episode featured exactly the kind of big swing a final season episode should take, but that the final season of "Voyager" too rarely risked. For everybody else on Voyager, the journey to Earth is a journey home. Getting back to Earth means getting back to their lives. But for Neelix, the Delta Quadrant is home. Going to Earth would have meant leaving behind everything he knew, and everyone he knew aside from the Voyager crew. So the colony of Talaxians provided a unique dilemma for Neelix: He had to either leave his people behind, or he had to leave his Voyager family behind. One thing that Raf Green's teleplay does very perceptively, and that LeVar Burton's direction is particularly attuned to, is that Neelix's decision ultimately comes down to the children. His bond with Brax was initially got him emotionally invested in the colony and its plight. But he considers Naomi Wildman family. The deciding factor is ultimately that Brax is younger than Naomi and needs him more than Naomi does. It helps that Scarlett Pomers was playing younger than her age when she was first cast but, at probably 12 or 13 by the time this episode was shot, was starting to look quite a bit older. Unlike most child actors who age faster than their characters, "Voyager" had a built-in explanation since Naomi's hybrid physiology caused her to develop faster than purely human children would. And Pomers played Naomi older in this episode, which really helped sell it. In terms of the conflict itself, it was a pretty standard-issue (for Star Trek) critique of free market capitalism run amok. I was perplexed by all of the talk about Voyager's intervention violating the Prime Directive since both species seemed to be warp-capable. The asteroid itself, while less hospitable than an M-class planet would be, is much cooler. Neelix's final scene on Voyager, with the crew standing at attention along the sides of the corridors, was really emotionally powerful -- As was Tuvok's little jig. The relationship between Neelix and "Mr. Vulcan" was one of the more complex and nuanced on the show. This episode really paid that off beautifully. It would be neat if "Picard" or another series set in the early 25th century did a follow-up with Ambassador Neelix and gave us a glimpse of relations between the Federation and the Delta Quadrant a few decades on.

  • "Renaissance Man": This would have been a perfectly adequate episode in season five or season six. As the penultimate story for the entire series, it's infuriating. First of all, Janeway and the Doctor are en route to a medical symposium when the captain gets captured. I could buy Dr. Crusher being en route to a medical symposium, but Voyager is 30,000 light years from the Federation in an area of space full of strangers, more hostile than friendly. It's just too cozy of a scenario for this show. Then there's the fact that the Doctor leaves Voyager dead in the water to save the captain, but the two extortionists simply aren't enough of a threat to provoke such an extreme response. But my main problem is that the episode ends with the status quo being pretty much the same as it's been. The show is heading into the two-part finale with a little less than half of the journey home left to go. That's inexcusable.

  • "Endgame" (two-parter): An extremely frustrating series finale. It opens strong, with a sequence of events set in 2404. Aesthetically, this future is very similar to the future from the TNG finale. We find the crew in bittersweet circumstances, much like we find the various characters in "Picard". But unlike "Picard", none of this is going to stick. Instead, the writers are going to have Admiral Janeway shake the etch-a-sketch. Nothing that happens after Admiral Janeway arrives in 2378 feels earned. The Borg are crippled, and Voyager makes it home and the only cost for all of this is a version of Janeway that will never exist because of her own manipulation of the timeline. Other than Captain Janeway pushing back against Admiral Janeway and pursuading her to take a riskier course of action, the characters we've been following for seven seasons lack agency in own salvation. They use magical technology from the future and follow instructions from Admiral Janeway, and everything goes according to plan. It was nice to have Alice Krige back as the Borg Queen, but her only real role in the finale is to be duped by Admiral Janeway. Even the character stuff doesn't work very well. The romance between Chakotay and Seven of Nine comes out of nowhere, and because there wasn't any groundwork laid for it, it doesn't have an impact. The birth of Miral Paris, which is the culmination of a season's worth of stories, happens offscreen with Tom not present. There is an emphasis on spectacle at the expense of character and story. In particular: At the expense of resolution. They make it to Earth, cut to credits. No reunions with family members, no glimpse into what the future held for each of them. No emotional payoff for finally achieving the goal that has driven them all series long.
Final Thoughts:
I have really enjoyed revisiting this series while in quarantine. It held up surprisingly well a couple decades on, and was at times more satisfying than I remembered it being the first time around. I have two real issues with the show:
  1. There should have been more consequences for being alone in a distant, unexplored, and often hostile corner of the galaxy with no support and no means of obtaining new crew or supplies. The journey should have been harder for Voyager, and their encounters with new species and new technology should have had a bigger impact on Voyager itself. I wanted to see more MacGuyver-esque improvization, and less of the same thing we could expect from any other Starfleet vessel on any other Star Trek show.

  2. The ending was mishandled. Other than ditching Neelix in "Homestead", there is very little that happens prior to "Endgame" that shapes the final outcome of the series. Instead of having future Janeway arrive with a magic wand to wisk Voyager home, the entire seventh season should have been about accomplishing the task. They should have identified a means to get home, but a means that requires acquiring supplies that Voyager doesn't have and making scientific and technological innovations in order to pull off. And then the season should have been about accomplishing all of the component tasks to accomplish the larger goal. I would have actually liked them to make it home in the second to last episode, and then use the finale to explore what happens to the various characters once they're back.
But even with those issues, I'm glad I took this journey with the show. The concept driving the show was a strong one, and the cast of characters were enjoyable, with a bridge crew that was a happy medium between the roguish adventurers of the Kirk Enterprise and the cerebral and by-the-book professionals of the Picard Enterprise. I hope someday ViacomCBS goes back and invests the money and resources to give the show an HD refresh the way it did with TNG. The limitations of a 480i presentation sourced from analog video tape were the primary downside of the show's age. While the digital effects improved steadily as the seasons wore on, recreating them using modern technology would be a leaps and bounds improvement, especially for the first few seasons.
Adam, thank you for diligently posting your thoughts on each day's rewatched episodes, I really enjoyed reading them. You've got me itching to do my own rewatch now!
 

Adam Lenhardt

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Dang it, Adam, I feel quite wistful over the fact that you have completed your Voyager journey. I have truly and sincerely enjoyed these posts and I will miss them now that they are done. Thanks to you, I revisited many episodes that I hadn't thought of in a long time. It was really special to be along on your ride.
Adam, thank you for diligently posting your thoughts on each day's rewatched episodes, I really enjoyed reading them. You've got me itching to do my own rewatch now!
Thank you both for the kind words!
 
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Josh Steinberg

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I’d like to echo those thoughts and say that I’m now interested in revisiting the show, and I only watched it three years ago.

I think your parting two criticisms are absolutely spot on. To my mind, TNG had the best finale of any of the Trek shows, and Voyager had the worst. After seven seasons of crafting a reality that I bought into and characters I got to watch grow in ways I didn’t expect to see in this era of Trek production, the finale served up a story I just didn’t believe, and robbed the characters of resolutions that they had genuinely earned. I’m not one to say an ending ruins an entire show because the journey was still quite enjoyable, but its a terrible finale.
 

Nelson Au

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Congratulations Adam for finishing the Voyager journey!

About the finale, I’ve been thinking over the years about the oft criticism that it didn’t show their arrival on earth and what happens to them once they get there. Sure it would have been interesting to see Paris see his father, or how Seven is received or Kim sees his parents Or Janeway’s promotion to admiral. Etc.

I’d bet the writers felt they sort of did that with the way the episode starts. So no need to revisit it. I’m not saying I wouldn’t have wanted to see their real/new reception. I’d argue that Enterprise had the worst finale. That robbed the characters an ending they deserved.
 

BobO'Link

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I’d like to echo those thoughts and say that I’m now interested in revisiting the show, and I only watched it three years ago.

I think your parting two criticisms are absolutely spot on. To my mind, TNG had the best finale of any of the Trek shows, and Voyager had the worst. After seven seasons of crafting a reality that I bought into and characters I got to watch grow in ways I didn’t expect to see in this era of Trek production, the finale served up a story I just didn’t believe, and robbed the characters of resolutions that they had genuinely earned. I’m not one to say an ending ruins an entire show because the journey was still quite enjoyable, but its a terrible finale.
I'm guessing you've not seen the ending for Enterprise. That one's a true slap-in-the-face to the actors of the series.

Even with my huge backlog of TV material to watch I, too, am wanting to revisit Voyager all because of Adam's comments.
 

Nelson Au

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Yeah, as soon as I finish my current TNG binge, Voyager could be my next Star Trek series to binge. And or DS9.
 
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BobO'Link

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I need to rewatch DS9 myself. After my last run through I realized I'd somehow skipped an entire season! It *had* been a month or so since I'd watched the "prior" season so that could have something to do with it. And that, for some reason, I didn't have it all in a single location. :wacko:
 
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Josh Steinberg

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I'm guessing you've not seen the ending for Enterprise. That one's a true slap-in-the-face to the actors of the series.

Even with my huge backlog of TV material to watch I, too, am wanting to revisit Voyager all because of Adam's comments.
I have seen Enterprise, and to be honest, I’ve always struggled with understanding why I’m supposed to be so outraged by its ending.

The show had a fabulous two part penultimate episode which wrapped up the season’s storyline and gave closure to ongoing character arcs. The finale proper sought to close out the Berman era of Trek at a time when it was believed that Star Trek was truly over forever. I thought they did a nice job of tipping their hat to that whole period of shows. For me, it was a nice epilogue.
 
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Jason_V

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I have seen Enterprise, and to be honest, I’ve always struggled with understanding why I’m supposed to be so outraged by its ending.

The show had a fabulous two part penultimate episode which wrapped up the season’s storyline and gave closure to ongoing character arcs. The finale proper sought to close out the Berman era of Trek at a time when it was believed that Star Trek was truly over forever. I thought they did a nice job of tipping their hat to that whole period of shows. For me, it was a nice epilogue.
Because the show is Enterprise and the series finale should be Enterprise, not sloppily injecting Riker and Troi into the final episode and making it a holodeck adventure for TNG.

If it's supposed to be an epilogue to the Berman years, it also fails. It kisses the butt of TNG with a half-glance at TOS in the last thirty seconds. It ignores 14 extra TV seasons of DS9 and Voyager.

Imagine if TNG's "All Good Things..." had been a Kirk fever dream about what the future could be like. Same thing.
 

BobO'Link

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I have seen Enterprise, and to be honest, I’ve always struggled with understanding why I’m supposed to be so outraged by its ending.

The show had a fabulous two part penultimate episode which wrapped up the season’s storyline and gave closure to ongoing character arcs. The finale proper sought to close out the Berman era of Trek at a time when it was believed that Star Trek was truly over forever. I thought they did a nice job of tipping their hat to that whole period of shows. For me, it was a nice epilogue.
Because the show is Enterprise and the series finale should be Enterprise, not sloppily injecting Riker and Troi into the final episode and making it a holodeck adventure for TNG.

If it's supposed to be an epilogue to the Berman years, it also fails. It kisses the butt of TNG with a half-glance at TOS in the last thirty seconds. It ignores 14 extra TV seasons of DS9 and Voyager.

Imagine if TNG's "All Good Things..." had been a Kirk fever dream about what the future could be like. Same thing.
I agree. Frakes thinks it was a bad thing:
Do you want to know the truth about that whole Enterprise thing as the show was called? Rick Berman, executive producer of all things Star Trek, called Marina and myself and said 'we'd like you to do the last episode of Enterprise' ...

They said it would be a Valentine to the fans, but all of it ended up doing I think was hurting Scott Bakula's feelings. He was such a gentleman about it and I said to Scott this is weird for me to be on your show and your show is being taken off before it should be taken off and he was such a gentleman about it and said "no, glad you're here" so it was awkward on all accounts, except with working with Marina again which is always lovely. But I wasn't crazy about it. And it was so thinly connected, I thought too.
Braga too:
I thought it was the coolest thing ever when we were writing it, the idea of doing a ‘lost episode’ of The Next Generation, but they’re going to the holodeck to look back at Enterprise, [co-writer Rick Berman] and I thought was a great sendoff to Star Trek [the franchise as it existed in 2005], and it didn’t work out so well. It was a kind of a slap in the face to the Enterprise actors. I heard it from everybody, it was the only time Scott Bakula was ever mean to me. I regret it.
And Berman:
I would have never done it if I had known how people were going to react," Berman told StarTrek.com in 2011. "We were informed with not a whole lot of time that this was our last season. We knew that this was going to be the last episode of Star Trek for perhaps quite some time – and here we are, almost six years later. So it was the last episode for quite a length of time. It was a very difficult choice, how to end it. The studio wanted it to be a one-hour episode. We wanted it to be special. We wanted it to be something that would be memorable. This idea, which Brannon (Braga) and I came up with – and I take full responsibility – pissed a lot of people off, and we certainly didn’t mean it to. Our thought was to take this crew and see them through the eyes of a future generation, see them through the eyes of the people who we first got involved in Star Trek with 18 years before, with Picard and Riker and Data, etc., and to see the history of how Archer and his crew went from where we had them to where, eventually, the Federation was formed, in some kind of a magical holographic history lesson.

"It seemed like a great idea," Berman continued. "A lot of people were furious about it. The actors, most of them, were very unhappy. In retrospect it was a bad idea. When it was conceived it was with our heart completely in the right place. We wanted to pay the greatest homage and honor to the characters of Enterprise that we possibly could, but because Jonathan (Frakes) and Marina (Sirtis) were the two people we brought in, and they were the ones looking back, it was perceived as 'You’re ending our series with a TNG episode.' I understand how people felt that way. Too many people felt that way for them to be wrong. Brannon and I felt terrible that we’d let a lot of people down. It backfired, but our hearts were definitely in the right place. It just was not accepted in the way we thought it would be."
They should have ended Enterprise with that 2 parter, not with a TNG episode disguised as an Enterprise finale.
 
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Adam Lenhardt

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I could never get into "Enterprise". I think I was looking for it to be The Right Stuff in the 22nd century, but what we got instead was more like a stroll through a new neighborhood. I heard it got better in the last couple seasons, but I didn't have the patience to make it that far.
 
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BobO'Link

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The last season of Enterprise was the best. Had that been the 1st, or even 3rd, season the series would have likely received the 7 seasons all the rest of them got.

From what I've read, the creators wanted S1 to be more "The Right Stuff" with the Enterprise launching at the end of the season. The "suits" said "No. Put them in space from the start." I think showing them getting everything together, figuring out the mechanics of and building the ship, would have made for a good season and start. It wouldn't have hurt to lose the theme song either. It's the only Trek open I always skip all because of the song.
 

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