Star Trek: The Compendium

Neil Middlemiss

Cinematographer
Reviewer
Joined
Nov 15, 2001
Messages
4,583
Real Name
Neil Middlemiss
XenForo Template Star Trek: The Compendium

Star Trek: The Compendium packages the 2009 Star Trek reboot with its sequel, Stat Trek Into Darkness, and contains all of the special features from the latter’s multiple retailer exclusive releases, including the terrific enhanced commentary that came with the iTunes release. The word compendium means “a publication containing a variety of works,” and so is a fitting title for this release given the 3D version isn’t a part of it. A collection of new special features were commissioned for this set as added incentive, along with a simple $5 rebate offer.Star Trek and Star Trek Into Darkness are explosively entertaining. Though they have yet to fully grip the allegorical power of Gene Rodenberry’s original vision, they earnestly seek to bring the core characters to life, with their friendships and approach to trials deeply reminiscent of those many of us fell in love with as Shatner’s Kirk, Nimoy’s Spock, Kelley’s Bones, and the rest of the iconic original, explored the great unknown. This is a fine release worthy of consideration – especially if you don’t already own one or both of the previous releases.

Posted Image


Studio: Paramount

Distributed By: N/A

Video Resolution and Encode: 1080P/AVC

Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1

Audio: English 5.1 Dolby TrueHD, English 7.1 Dolby TrueHD, Spanish 5.1 DD, Other

Subtitles: English, English SDH, Spanish, French, Portuguese

Rating: PG-13

Run Time: 126 Mins / 131 Mins

Package Includes:

Special case, plastic innards, embossed cover

Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer)

Region: A

Release Date: 09/09/2014

MSRP: $44.99




The Production Rating: 4/5

“There will always be those who mean to do us harm. To stop them, we risk awakening the same evil within ourselves. Our first instinct is to seek revenge when those we love are taken from us. But that's not who we are... When Christopher Pike first gave me his ship, he had me recite the Captain's Oath. Words I didn't appreciate at the time. But now I see them as a call for us to remember who we once were and who we must be again. And those words: Space, the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Her five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no one has gone before.”

Star Trek – 4.5/5

A young George Kirk (Chris Hemsworth) heroically assumes command of the cripples U.S.S Kelvin following a devastating attack by a craft that poured through a rift in space/time. In the final moments of his life, he saved countless fellow crew including his wife as she gives birth to their son, whom they name James just before the Kelvin is destroyed. Years later, a rebellious young James Kirk, bruised following a bar fight, is recruited into Starfleet Academy by Captain Pike (Bruce Greenwood,) a man who knew Kirk’s father. The listless Kirk agrees and soon begins making a name for himself with his cocky, womanizing ways. But the deadly threat that took his father’s life reemerges and the U.S.S Enterprise, captained by Pike, is dispatched with a rookie crew or 3rd year cadets to face off against a malevolent and overpowering enemy.2009’s Star Trek, a risky reboot of the Original Series crew, triumphs as grand science-fiction entertainment. Though sidelining the ardent allegorical underpinnings of Gene Rodenberry’s classic creation, in the hands of director J.J Abrams, Star Trek is reborn as a spectacular action adventure with a likeable and fitting young cast filling the iconic characters’ shoes. Revolving the reboot’s plot around a time/space incursion that altered the course of events in the future we witnessed in the Original Series – creating an alternate timeline (or alternate universe if you so desire), was both a stroke a genius and a source of controversy. On balance, it was the right decision, freeing the writers and producers of future installments of this rebirth from a pre-destined future deeply explored through three seasons and six feature films. But going back to the drawing board to launch anew something fans across the globe held close was a fantastically tricky proposition. The calculated move proved enormously successful, winning critics, general audiences, and aside from a vocal portion of fans of the Original Series legacy (and those fans do have some legitimate criticisms,) many of us Trekkies (or Trekkers if you prefer.)Director J.J. Abrams may have overused his now notorious lens flare effect, but his approach to the material here is fresh, inventive at times, and enormously capable for his largest production to date at that time. The production is abounding with energy, visually engrossing with top-notch and expansive visual effects, and accompanied by a score by Michael Giacchino that suits the adventure and scale almost perfectly. Admittedly, the score takes some time to warm to – especially for those of us deeply enamored by the music of Jerry Goldsmith and James Horner for Kirk and crews previous big screen adventures, but Giacchino captures the essence of the 23rd century adventures with aplomb.Perhaps one of the Star Trek reboot’s highest accomplishments was the cast chosen to embody the iconic roles are terrific. Chris Pine delivers Captain Kirk with the superb cadence; rife with a cocksureness and attention to female beauty long established for his character by William Shatner before him. Zachary Quinto as Spock is expertly cast. Quinto, perhaps best known for his menacing role as Sylar on NBC’s Heroes prior to his casting as Spock, is very likable. In Star Trek, and perhaps more so in the sequel, Star Trek Into Darkness, his Spock is tonally more variant than the version created by Leonard Nimoy. A more emotional Vulcan than we’ve seen before, Quinto nonetheless possesses the skills necessary to deliver lines with a knowing fluency of Vulcan dictated logic and assuredness. Zoe Saldana’s Uhura is perhaps the most challenging of the recasting. Nichelle Nicoles’ take on the role was graceful and deeply empathetic. Saldana is given space to be more assertive (courtesy of the writing, Nichelle would have been equally capable with the same script,) but at times her Uhura is also offered little more than to serve as an emotional presence (sad, angered, slighted, worried) for her love interest, Spock (this is even more prevalent in the sequel.) Karl Urban’s Bones is a wonderfully strong echo of DeForest Kelley’s grumpy and acerbic Dr. McCoy. Urban, the elder of the new crew, is infectious to watch in his scenes. Simon Pegg’s Scotty serves as the comic relief. At times too focused on going for a laugh (courtesy of the script,) Pegg nonetheless has what it takes to follow in the great James Doohan’s footsteps as the legendary chief engineer. Long the peripheral characters of the original crew, Sulu, portrayed here by John Cho, and Chekov, brought to life by Anton Yelchin, are introduced with purpose and power in this reboot. Though they would be largely sidelined as characters in Into Darkness, the time spent on this characters in this film demonstrate how compelling they can be, Sulu in particular.As for supporting players, Bruce Greenwood’s Captain Pike is absolutely spot on. Greenwood has gravitas, confidence, and fortitude in the role to be entirely convincing. As an actor, he has long exuded qualities of leadership and they shine here. Star Trek can live and die on its villain. When it’s a good one (Khan, the Borg,) the feature film can shine. And while I would not place Eric Bana’s Nero, the aggrieved Romulan seeking vengeance, aside Trek’s greatest, his performance is solid as a foil around which the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise can come together and galvanize as a team.The original series of Star Trek, and their follow-up feature films, were about adventures in the 23rd century. The reboot of Star Trek adds, in capital letters, ACTION to that equation. This comes at the expense of the more contemplative element of the franchise, but as a hook for broadening the fan base, it was wildly effective. With that power, it should be hoped that greater science fiction concepts will be explored, beyond the visually stunning battles and destruction that punctuate this film (and, again, more so its sequel.

Star Trek Into Darkness – 3.5/5

When the indigenous and primitive species on Nibiru witness the grand spectacle of the Enterprise rising from the ocean, as Captain Kirk flagrantly abandons the Prime Directive, and Spock’s wishes, to rescue the Vulcan science officer from within an exploding volcano, Kirk is stripped of his command. His superior officers learned of his violation of the directive, which dictates that no member of Starfleet may take an action or omission of action that interferes with or exposes to technology, a non-warp species, through Spock’s submission of his report, a report which differed from Kirk’s considerably. Feeling betrayed by his science officer, whom Kirk broke the rules to save (for reasons Spock is unable to grasp) the now former captain drowns his sorrows in a bar. He is then approached by his friend and mentor, Admiral Pike, to serve as his first officer aboard his former ship. It is Kirk’s second chance.When an act of terrorism destroys a Starfleet facility in London, Starfleet officers – the senior ranking members of the ships in the vicinity – are called, per procedure, to headquarters to meet with Admiral Marcus. It is here that a mysterious individual, reportedly a former member of Starfleet, unleashes a vicious strike, killing many in attendance. Kirk is enraged and, upon getting his command back, seeks to track down the murderer, John Harrison, and end his life. Harrison has retreated deep into Klingon territory, to a place where he believes Starfleet cannot and will not pursue him due to the escalating relations between Humans and the Klingons. But Kirk, under the orders of Admiral Marcus, is undeterred. With orders to head to the edge of Klingon territory and unleash a new type of cloaked photon torpedo, Kirk sets out with a vendetta, acting, as his crew begins to observe, without regard for safety and the tenets of what Starfleet is supposed to stand for. But all is not quite as it seems.There are elements to celebrate and elements to lament when watching Into Darkness. At its core, the film is an exploration of (or at least an attempt at exploring) outcomes – decisions, allegiances, actions, and inaction. In this regard, Into Darkness is travelling some of the same ground as the 2009 reboot, though that film partnered its foundational theme with that of fate as lives seem to flow among the eddies of existence, destined to cross paths one way or another . J.J. Abrams’ follow-up narrows its focus considerably even while it expands the visuals to a scale Star Trek has never seen. The film is much darker in tone. Kirk is fueled by revenge, as is John Harrison, and the still emerging relationships of the crew, particularly Kirk and Spock, hit a rough spell. But first and foremost, Into Darkness is an action-adventure with a mightily impressive scale– something Director Abrams handles with confidence and skill.The core actors continue to surprise in how well they fill the shoes of these legendary roles though there are some steps backwards from the 2009 film. While most continue to shine in their roles, disappointingly, John Cho’s Sulu and Anton Yelchin’s Chekov are given very little of substance to do in the sequel. While both are involved in a few key elements of the film, neither is given any weight in the story, though Sulu’s stern warning to John Harrison from the Captain’s Chair gives us a glimpse at how exciting he would be in assigned permanently to that chair. Supporting players like Bruce Greenwood’s terrific Pike, Peter Weller’s no-nonsense Admiral Marcus, and Alice Eve’s charming Carol augment the fine cast and serve their roles well.And then we have Benedict Cumberbatch as John Harrison.Cumberbatch’s task in taking on the John Harrison role was both weighty and liberating. Given a role that is a twist on an iconic one in Trek lore, he at once must establish anew a notorious Trek villain while remaking the role as the different plot, setting, and circumstances demand. A character of uncompromising intellect and physical strength, Cumberbatch portrays the menace and sympathy with strident turns. At times he is chewing the scenery, not unlike the fine actor portraying the original version, but it’s oh so much fun to watch. Cumberbatch has a natural sense of menace in his often stoic stare – something he manipulates with perfection in his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes in the BBC series Sherlock – and he manages to entertainingly deliver threats and predictions with a knowing sense of outcome. Sparring with the more rugged and unpolished hero that is this incarnation of James T. Kirk, Cumberbatch succeeds in making this character his own.One of the successes of Star Trek Into Darkness is in the steps taken to bring these characters closer to the ones we have loved and cherished since the 1960s. On the back of the prime directive quandary present in the storyline is a testing of the friendship between Kirk and Spock. In many ways witnessing how they earned each other’s respect and friendship – and a reliance upon each other that served them well in the prime universe – is one of the unique and interesting opportunities of this alternate timeline. How the remaining cast demonstrates innate capabilities to survive and thrive in extraordinary situations is another joy of this reboot. But, as with the James Bond reset that found Daniel Craig filling the 007 spy character, there is a yearning and apparent impatience to get these films back to the ‘groove’ of the original cast dynamic, and quickly.Star Trek Into Darkness is a surprising Star Trek film. In all of the big screen adventures, featuring Kirk and crew or the crew of The Next Generation under Captain Picard, there has always been a somewhat confined feel to the scope and scale. Largely budget driven, that tighter feel commonly gave rise to an inwardly facing drama accompanying whatever the outwardly facing threat or mission was. While that exists in Into Darkness, because the film is so big, it feels dwarfed at times. And the scope of the film is considerably larger as well. Delivering a more global feel, with important scenes taking place in a futuristic London as well as San Francisco, where the cities are fully realized in superb detail, it is clear that Paramount and the producers are appealing to the international markets in a way they never had before.In the days of the original Captain Kirk, as he led his experienced crew to explore the V’ger phenomenon, battle Khan, find Spock, save the whales, journey to the center of the universe, and become the olive branch to the Klingon race, the adventures of the U.S.S Enterprise were always grander in idea than in execution. Modest budgets and varying levels of box office success kept the spectacle relatively small though the ideas at the heart of each films plot were earnest if not always well-executed. But for this new cast, following the surprising box office haul and subsequent home video market success, the budget was increased to around $190MM –enough to have paid for the all the original crew films plus Generations (in unadjusted dollars) combined (or the first three films in adjusted dollars), and the result is a film that is a wonderful visual treat, resplendent with Industrial Light and Magic’s masterful skills in the visual effects domain, and technical skills throughout the crew that render Into Darkness a contender for the most impressive looking film of the summer.Star Trek has always occupied a different space depending upon the medium. On television, with smaller budgets and a focus on more science-fiction concepts, bold and revelatory ideas had fertile ground to grow. Allegorical stories had space to hold a mirror up to the human race and explore who we are, have been, and could be as a species through the more perfect future imagined by Gene Roddenberry and a stellar group of writers. On the big screen, The Motion Picture notwithstanding, it became less about looking at ourselves and more about enjoying the iconic characters act, and interact, in heroic and interpersonal ways. And that’s what Into Darkness has aimed for. Big, bold summer tent pole motion picture status is entirely new for Star Trek, a franchise whose greatest moments have come on the small screen. The hour-long drama format has long best served the idealistic storytelling at the heart of what Star Trek is. In that regard, it is tough to watch the crew of the enterprise evolve into the beloved characters we know in two-hour movies spaced three or four years apart. And in a summer spectacle blockbuster, the evolution of these characters doesn’t have as much room to breathe as we might like. Star Trek has a place on the big screen, but its rightful place is in the medium of television.Having said all that, Star Trek Into Darkness is so energetically paced; so exciting and explosive; so visually arresting and aurally overwhelming, that it is near impossible not to be entertained by it all. And though there is clearly work on screen to move the characters into, and through challenges, that let us continue to see them develop into the beloved crew we were enamored watching on their original 5-year journey, we just need more of it among the spectacular scenes of cities crumbling and starships being ripped apart.


Video Rating: 5/5 3D Rating: NA

Star Trek 5/5

From Pat Wahlquist’s 2009 Review of the Star Trek Blu-ray:“Star Trek is encoded in the MPEG-4 AVC codec at 1080p with a 2.39:1 aspect ratio. This is a very slick transfer with both CG effects and practical sets and locations intermingling to form a believable and dynamic image. Colors are somewhat stylized yet accurately represented: the bridge of the Enterprise maintains a very pop-art appearance with various light boards, buttons, joysticks and other controls hovering around the pastels and whites (such a difference from previous bridge sets) while the interiors of Nero’s ship are dreary and dirty. This contrast of colors further enhances the good vs. bad aspect of the picture. Flesh tones are very well represented, although I was a little disappointed not to see a green tint to Spock’s face as had been done in previous movies. Colors remains strong and bold and don’t bleed: check out the scene in the Starfleet auditorium and see just how sharp the definition is between the bodies clad in a sea of maroon. There is also a nice difference seen in the barren deserts of Vulcan as compared to the fields of Iowa, with the former conveying a dusty, hot feeling and the latter a humid and lush feeling.Detail is excellent, especially in the CG scenes as I could see humans and Romulans interacting with one another in the windows of their respective ships. This level of clarity in the picture also contributes to the depth of field giving us a very interesting experience. The picture is just slightly soft but that helps to maintain a consistent look between the CG work and the filmed elements. The image is free from any type of processing and I noticed no edge enhancement or DNR. I thought there may have been a minor tweak in the form of DNR when I looked closely at Quinto, but it appears as if his make-up was applied slightly thicker to suggest a slight difference inherent in his Vulcan roots. Since this is such a new release, there was no dirt or other distractions. Black levels were also excellent showing some good depth and detail.”

Star Trek Into Darkness 5/5

The standard of this Blu-ray release is reference quality – both in terms of audio and video. Stunning color contrast exist throughout the feature, with deeply saturated blacks, vivid bright colors, notably the red on the opening planet Nibiru and the crisp white of the pristine bridge and hallways. Detail is fantastic. Having been shot on film in 2.35:1, and about 40% shot in the 15-perf IMAX® format (which opens up the frame in key scenes, with astonishing detail), the texture of the movie is a delight. It was stunning on IMAX screens and at home, though considerably smaller, still demonstrates a wonderfully involving image. The previous release on home video, in either 2D or 3D, did not include the shifting ratios and so that might be noticeable for some. But, as with Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (the Wal Mart exclusive edition), and The Dark Knight Rises, the shifting ratio only serves to augment the scene at hand.J.J. Abrams agreed to direct Star Trek Into Darkness following the triumphant success of the first film in the reboot. Paramount insisted on 3D, but rather than film native, Abrams chose to allow a post-conversion (to allow him to make the film with his stated filming preference). Shown in 3D and IMAX 3D the results on the big screen were really quite good. Much to the chagrin of some fans, this edition does not have the 3D version, hamstringing the notion of this being a complete release.



Audio Rating: 5/5

Star Trek 5/5

From Pat Wahlquist’s 2009 Review of the Star Trek Blu-ray:“This 5.1 Dolby TrueHD seems to be following the trend of some other action movies where they are actually toning down the loudness and complexity of the sound designs and focusing more on the primary elements of the scene. This is really driven home during Nero’s attack on the Kelvin when open space invades a breached ship and the area quickly depressurizes. The sound mutes itself as it truly would to conform to the rules of space. By doing this, the sound designer, Ben Burtt, adds a much more realistic dimension to what is in effect, a fantasy. There is just enough information in the action scenes to keep us focused on the story without being distracted by too much information in the surround channels. That is not to say the surrounds don’t get a workout, they do, but they integrate and support the very active front channels. I particularly liked how the classic “pinging” sounds of various computers always seemed to be present when we were on the Enterprise. Transitions between each of the channels are seamless. Fidelity is excellent producing a clean and clear presentation that is free from any distortion. Bass effects come alive in the action scenes, obviously, but they do not overshadow the rest of the soundtrack. Voices are natural sounding but ADR is noticed in a couple scenes. Michael Giacchino’s score is also very well represented here and he adds so much to the opening scenes between Kirk’s parents. I’ve become a fan of his during his time spent scoring Lost and he adds a great emotional punch to these scenes.

Star Trek Into Darkness 5/5

The English 7.1 Dolby TrueHD audio is brilliant. Audio tracks don’t come much better than this. Handling an exhausting amount of action, with phaser fire zipping around the sonic sphere of the 7 channels, chaotic and explosive action sequences placing heavy demand on the subwoofer, the surrounds, the front channels, and Michael Giacchino’s expanding themes running alongside, the quality of the audio never fails. Precision of sound and exemplary sound design conspire to thrill throughout the 2-hour plus running time. A seriously impressive audio.


Special Features Rating: 5/5

Star Trek 5/5

Disc 1Star Trek in high definitionCommentary by J.J. Abrams, Bryan Burk, Alex Kurtzman, Damon Lindelof and Roberto OrciDisc 2To Boldly Go — Taking on the world’s most beloved science fiction franchise was no small mission. Director J.J. Abrams, writers Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman, producer Damon Lindelof, and executive producer Bryan Burk talk about the many challenges they faced and their strategy for success.Branching Pods: - The Shatner Conundrum- Red Shirt Guy- The Green Girl- Trekker Alert!Casting — The producers knew their greatest task was finding the right cast to reprise these epic roles. The cast, for their part, talk about the experience of trying to capture the essence of these mythic characters. The piece concludes with a moving tribute to Leonard Nimoy.A New Vision — J.J. Abrams’ vision was not only to create a Star Trek that was a bigger, more action-packed spectacle, but also to make the spectacle feel real. Every aspect of production—from unique locations to the use of classic Hollywood camera tricks—was guided by this overall objective.Branching Pods: - Savage PressureStarships — Abrams and production designer Scott Chambliss were careful to pay tribute to the design of the original Enterprise, but they also wanted to make it futuristic and cool for a modern audience. This chapter focuses on the unique stories behind the creation of the film’s starships.Branching Pods: - Warp Explained- Paint Job- Bridge Construction Accelerated- The Captain’s Chair- Button Acting 101- Narada Construction Accelerated- Shuttle ShuffleAliens — Designers Neville Page and Joel Harlow talk about the hurdles they faced creating new alien species, recreating the Romulans and Vulcans, and designing the terrifying creatures on Delta Vega for the new Star Trek.Branching Pods: - The Alien Paradox- Big-Eyed Girl- Big Bro Quinto- Klingons- Drakoulias Anatomy 101Planets — From the frozen landscape of Delta Vega to the desert plains of Vulcan, Scott Chambliss and the art department had a number of radically different planets to create. Abrams’ desire to shoot on real locations whenever possible led the production team to a number of strange and surprising locations.Branching Pods: - Extra Business- ConfidentialityProps and Costumes — Property master Russell Bobbitt had the unique challenge of designing props that were both true to the original series and pertinent to today’s technology. Likewise, costume designer Michael Kaplan talks about how he designed costumes that paid homage to what came before yet were relevant and timeless.Branching Pods: - Klingon WardrobeBen Burtt and the Sounds of Star Trek — When famed sound designer Ben Burtt was hired to create sounds for the first Star Wars film, he took his inspiration from the original Star Trek series. Burtt jumped at the opportunity to pay tribute to the sounds that sparked his career with the sounds he created for the new Star Trek.Score — As a fan of the original series, composer Michael Giacchino embraced the challenge of creating new music for Star Trek while preserving the spirit of Alexander Courage’s celebrated theme.Gene Roddenberry’s Vision — J.J. Abrams, Leonard Nimoy, previous Star Trek writers and producers, and scientific consultant Carolyn Porco describe and commend the optimistic and enduring vision of Gene Roddenberry.Deleted Scenes with Optional CommentaryStarfleet Vessel Simulator — Explore extensive data on the U.S.S. Enterprise and the Romulan ship, the Narada. Submerse yourself in breathtaking 360° views and close-ups and review detailed tech information.Gag ReelTrailers

Star Trek Into Darkness 5/5

Disc 3Star Trek Into Darkness IMAX Version in high definitionEnhanced CommentaryDisc 4The Voyage Begins… Again — Go behind-the-scenes as filming begins on the next Star Trek adventure.Creating the Red Planet — Experience the creation of a never-before-seen alien world, as featured in the action-packed opening sequence of the film.Introducing the VillainRebuilding the Enterprise — See the design and construction of a bigger, interconnected Enterprise set.National Ignition Facility: Home of the Core — Location shooting at the National Ignition Facility.Attack on Starfleet — Go behind the scenes with the cast and filmmakers and witness the creation of the shocking attack on Starfleet Headquarters.Aliens Encountered — The design and application of alien makeup.The Klingon Home World — Discover the stunning world of Kronos, and see how the filmmakers reinvented the Klingons for a new generation.The Enemy of My Enemy — Find out how, and why, the identity of the film’s true villain was kept a mystery to the very end.Vengeance is Coming — A comprehensive look at the design and production surrounding the black ship.Ship to Ship — An in-depth and thrilling look at the filming of the iconic space jump sequence, which both defied the laws of physics and pushed the limits of visual effects.Mr. Spock and Mr. Spock — Leonard Nimoy makes a cameo appearance and reflects on his history with Trek.Down with the Ship — Discover the stunt & VFX work involved to make the Enterprise roll over.Kirk and Spock — Explore the dynamic relationship between the film’s heroes.Brawl by the Bay — Sit in with Zachary Quinto and Benedict Cumberbatch as they revisit their intense preparation for the film’s breathtaking climax.Continuing the Mission — An inspiring look at the partnership between the film’s crew and the organization that assists returning veterans to find meaningful ways to contribute on the home front.Unlocking the Cut — A discussion with the film editors about their monumental task.The Sounds of Music (and FX) — A discussion with film composer Michael Giacchino and sound designer Ben Burtt.Visual Affection — A comprehensive look at the creation and implementation of visual effects.Safety First — A prank pulled on the cast.Theatrical TrailersNEW! Deleted ScenesNEW! Gag ReelNEW! Fitting the Future — A look at the film’s out-of-this-world costumes.NEW! Property of Starfleet — Sourcing and tracking the film’s myriad props.


Overall Rating: 4.5/5

The Star Trek Compendium is a release designed, in part, to make up for the debacle of Star Trek Into Darkness’ original Blu-ray release. With special features broken up across multiple exclusive retailer editions, fans were left scratching their heads at the foolish approach to the release. Paramount heeded feedback, much of which was scornfully posted right here at Home Theater Forum, and from The DigitalBits’ Bill Hunt’s comments to the studio’s marketing folk, and consolidated all of Into Darkness’ special features into this release. Packaging it with 2009’s Star Trek may ruffle some feathers (as most likely already own this) is offset a little by a $5 rebate, but fans will need to determine for themselves how enticing this release is for a double dip to obtain the plentiful special features. Not containing the 3D version of the film means the term ‘complete’ won’t work. A 3D version of the film that contains the shifting ratios for the IMAX release remains unavailable on home video at this time (the previous 3D Blu-ray release is 2.35:1 only.)In closing, let me repeat my final words on Star Trek Into Darkness from my review of the 3D release.Into Darkness was a very good summer action film but just a ‘good’ Star Trek film. That judgment is based on perhaps more than the content delivered onscreen. Of my nearly 40 years, an enormous number of them have been with a love of Star Trek firmly in my heart. I thoroughly enjoyed 2009s Star Trek and how the new crew came together aboard the Enterprise despite living in an alternate timeline from the Shatner/Nimoy/Kelly/Nichols/Doohan/Takei/Koenig embodied crew before. There was a sense of adventure about the film and though the characters did not always conform to the parameters long established (Spock in particular), there was real energy and fun infused into the reimagined Roddenberry creation. Into Darkness just doesn’t boldly go where Star Trek hasn’t gone before. I found the alternate take on history (the matchup between Kirk and the foe that is the revealed John Harrison) intriguing to say the least. It’s a great take on the ‘what if’ question and reasonably explained as a result of the alternate timeline. I like ‘what ifs’, and I like the story explored here, but my desire for something unique to this timeline, something that doesn’t beg comparison, or irk skeptical fans, or awkwardly parallel what has come before, means that I would have preferred they not touch this idea…at least not this early on.


Reviewed By: Neil Middlemiss


Support HTF when you buy this title:

 

Josh Steinberg

Film Editor
Reviewer
Joined
Jun 10, 2003
Messages
18,755
Real Name
Josh Steinberg
Neil, thanks for the review - I really appreciate your mentioning the lack of 3D for "Into Darkness". It's a shame that Paramount for whatever reason could not be compelled to include the IMAX 3D version, as originally released in theaters -- even more upsetting considering that their "Transformers 4" Blu-ray 3D release will include the IMAX 3D version of that film, on their very first attempt at releasing it.

If you remember, about how long were the deleted scenes and gag reel for "Into Darkness"? 99% sure I'm not getting this (I really, really, really want the film in its IMAX 3D format), but I'm naturally curious. The deleted scenes for Star Trek '09 were really cool, and while I agree with the filmmakers that they were best left out of the film, I thought they were above average compared to deleted scenes from other films.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Osato

Jake Lipson

Executive Producer
Premium
Joined
Dec 21, 2002
Messages
10,995
Real Name
Jake Lipson
I am glad to see the IMAX version becoming available, and I can't handle 3D, so the absence of that one does not affect me, though I understand why people want it. Since it was post-converted, though, the 2D IMAX version offered here is technically what Abrams shot, and that was not offered in theaters, since IMAX only shows films in 2D if no 3D version is available (like Christopher Nolan's stuff.) This really bothers me because it makes me unable to see films in iMAX the majority of the time.

Anyway - I really want the IMAX version of Into Darkness. Correcting the supplemental problem, especially the commentary, is nice too. However, Amazon's current $33.99 is too much, even with the $5 rebate. I already have the original release of Star Trek, so I don't need that again, and to get me to buy it again the price would have to be substantially cheaper. So I will wait for a price drop, or for a future re-release to break the new Into Darkness discs out of the set on their own, whichever happens first.
 

SD_Brian

Supporting Actor
Joined
Nov 14, 2007
Messages
645
Real Name
Brian
The Star Trek Compendium is a release designed, in part, to make up for the debacle of Star Trek Into Darkness’ original Blu-ray release. With special features broken up across multiple exclusive retailer editions, fans were left scratching their heads at the foolish approach to the release. Paramount heeded feedback, much of which was scornfully posted right here at Home Theater Forum, and from The DigitalBits’ Bill Hunt’s comments to the studio’s marketing folk, and consolidated all of Into Darkness’ special features into this release.
I find it very hard to believe this was some "See? We're listening to the fans!" mea culpa from Paramount rather than a blatant double-dip that was always a part of the original release strategy for ST: Into Darkness. If it was really about making amends, I can think of better ways of apologizing than by reselling to the fans a bunch of content they already own for a not-exactly-discounted price ($5.00 rebate notwithstanding).

It's not a release I would have bought anyway as I'm not a fan of ST:ID. Still, I'm surprised people seem to be falling for this.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Johnny Angell

Neil Middlemiss

Cinematographer
Reviewer
Joined
Nov 15, 2001
Messages
4,583
Real Name
Neil Middlemiss
SD_Brian said:
I find it very hard to believe this was some "See? We're listening to the fans!" mea culpa from Paramount rather than a blatant double-dip that was always a part of the original release strategy for ST: Into Darkness. If it was really about making amends, I can think of better ways of apologizing than by reselling to the fans a bunch of content they already own for a not-exactly-discounted price ($5.00 rebate notwithstanding).

It's not a release I would have bought anyway as I'm not a fan of ST:ID. Still, I'm surprised people seem to be falling for this.
I'm trying to think of another release, from any studio, where retailer exclusive special features were consolidated into a single release and made available in this way. I can't think of one, but perhaps there are others. Bill Hunt's comments (following his meeting with folks over at Paramount on this very issue) seem to counter your perspective on the matter. I'm not faulting your opinion. We've seen far too many instances in the past where studios are happy to fleece customers. I just don't think this is necessarily one of those times where it was all planned out in advance to get us all to double dip. That mistake was made up front when they broke up the special features across multiple retailer exclusives upon ST:ID's bow on Blu-ray.
 

Osato

Producer
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2001
Messages
6,258
Neil - Nice job on the review. I enjoyed reading it. I'm passing on this set as I have both films on blu ray. The Into Darkness extras are not enough for me to purchase both titles again. Even with the $5 rebate.

I enjoyed your comments about how the newer films haven't quite measured up to great Trek films. I agree with you!
I did enjoy 2009, but I'm hoping that part 3 in this new series has a bit more heart and story to them.
I also agree they waited much too long for Into Darkness. 4 years is too long of a wait!!!

Looking forward to the new one coming in 2016. Hoping that the new writers and the new director give us a good classic Star Trek film and story.
 

Johnny Angell

Played With Dinosaurs Member
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Dec 13, 1998
Messages
12,410
Location
Central Arkansas
Real Name
Johnny Angell
Neil, I'm trying to think of another example of splitting up the extras like they did with STID. I don't get why anyone thinks the studio is being generous. "We are so sorry, here buy both movies AGAIN and we'll give you a whole $5 off. Oh, BTW, NO 3D."
 
  • Like
Reactions: Osato

Neil Middlemiss

Cinematographer
Reviewer
Joined
Nov 15, 2001
Messages
4,583
Real Name
Neil Middlemiss
Johnny Angell said:
Neil, I'm trying to think of another example of splitting up the extras like they did with STID. I don't get why anyone thinks the studio is being generous. "We are so sorry, here buy both movies AGAIN and we'll give you a whole $5 off. Oh, BTW, NO 3D."
Agreed - I wouldn't characterize this release as the studio being 'generous.'
 

TravisR

Studio Mogul
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2004
Messages
35,252
Location
The basement of the FBI building
Neil Middlemiss said:
I'm trying to think of another release, from any studio, where retailer exclusive special features were consolidated into a single release and made available in this way. I can't think of one, but perhaps there are others. Bill Hunt's comments (following his meeting with folks over at Paramount on this very issue) seem to counter your perspective on the matter. I'm not faulting your opinion. We've seen far too many instances in the past where studios are happy to fleece customers. I just don't think this is necessarily one of those times where it was all planned out in advance to get us all to double dip. That mistake was made up front when they broke up the special features across multiple retailer exclusives upon ST:ID's bow on Blu-ray.
Yeah, I'm sure Paramount is more than happy to make some more money but at the same time, they're giving fans what they went berserk over not getting last year. I plan on waiting for a sale on this release but even if I bought it now, I don't see a reason to really whine (leaving aside the lack of an IMAX version) when I'd be getting two fun movies for about $30 after the rebate and they're correcting a dumb mistake.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Osato

Josh Steinberg

Film Editor
Reviewer
Joined
Jun 10, 2003
Messages
18,755
Real Name
Josh Steinberg
JakeLip said:
Since it was post-converted, though, the 2D IMAX version offered here is technically what Abrams shot, and that was not offered in theaters, since IMAX only shows films in 2D if no 3D version is available (like Christopher Nolan's stuff.)
For what it's worth, although the film was shot in 2D, unlike a lot of post-conversions, this was planned for a 3D release from day one. They took some additional steps on set to make the conversion process turn out better, giving the conversion team more material to work with than they would usually get. For example, for each shot in the film, after getting the take they wanted with the actors, they also did another take without the actors in the shot but with everything else identical (the camera placement and moves, lighting, etc), which allowed the conversion team to do a more accurate, visually pleasing job.

After the initial IMAX 3D run, IMAX supplied the movie to some non-multiplex IMAX theaters, like science museums and aquariums. For theaters that couldn't run the 3D version, they sent either the left or right eye print so it could run in 2D IMAX. It sounded pretty cool and I checked it out in that way, but it wasn't as good as a dedicated 2D print would have been -- the color timing was based on it being viewed in 3D with glasses on, so the image was way too bright and the colors in general were not quite right. Also, because of the way the film was converted (where they used the master footage to synthesize both "left" and "right" eye versions instead of making the 2D negative the "left" or "right" eye and creating the other), there were moments when the frame would jump a little and there would be a little bit of dead black space on either the left or the right of the frame. (When both the left and right eyes for those scenes would have been combined and projected in 3D, those would have been the moments when you saw the most amount of depth and/or popout.) But even though it wasn't what I'd consider an ideal presentation, I thought it was cool to check out what it would be like. Plus, my first excursion on the Metro North rail to visit Connecticut, so I guess that's something :) For this film, I would have loved if they had prepared a dedicated 2D IMAX print for IMAX dome showings, I bet that would have been really cool.

Jake, I've noticed that occasionally IMAX will do 2D showings of 3D movies in their regular multiplex theaters -- they did for "Man Of Steel" in NYC and a few others I'm blanking on. Three of the four IMAX theaters showed it in 3D, but the other one offered both 2D and 3D showings at various times in the day. In the past, when I've emailed the IMAX email address that's shown at the end of all of their presentations in theaters, they've always been super nice about taking the time to send a nice (not form letter) response. It might be worth dropping them a note to say basically, "Hey, I love IMAX, but I can't see 3D and I've heard you sometimes do 2D showings of 3D films, and that's something I'd totally be interested in if you were to do it again." Who knows, they might listen!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Osato

Jeff Cooper

Effects Supervisor
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2000
Messages
2,244
Neil Middlemiss said:
I'm trying to think of another release, from any studio, where retailer exclusive special features were consolidated into a single release and made available in this way. I can't think of one, but perhaps there are others. Bill Hunt's comments (following his meeting with folks over at Paramount on this very issue) seem to counter your perspective on the matter. I'm not faulting your opinion. We've seen far too many instances in the past where studios are happy to fleece customers. I just don't think this is necessarily one of those times where it was all planned out in advance to get us all to double dip. That mistake was made up front when they broke up the special features across multiple retailer exclusives upon ST:ID's bow on Blu-ray.
Well it will be quite simple to see if it was indeed them admitting they made a mistake, by seeing if they ever pull the same stunt again for a future movie.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Osato

Neil Middlemiss

Cinematographer
Reviewer
Joined
Nov 15, 2001
Messages
4,583
Real Name
Neil Middlemiss
Jeff Cooper said:
Well it will be quite simple to see if it was indeed them admitting they made a mistake, by seeing if they ever pull the same stunt again for a future movie.
I was looking over the release strategy that Paramount has for Transformers: Age of Extinction and it appears that all of the special features will be available as standard for the editions, the differentiators for the retailer exclusives being physical add-ons (special case, drawstring bag, fathead decal, etc.) This lends credence to the 'lesson learned' theory.

But memories can be short, so no guarantee we won't see it again sometime. But for now it appears things at Paramount re: special features are 'back to normal.'
 
  • Like
Reactions: Osato

Joseph Bolus

Effects Supervisor
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 4, 1999
Messages
2,753
Thanks for the great review! And your last paragraph perfectly defines the way I think about "Into Darkness". I was ready for a new adventure in the alternate timeline. I didn't want or need a rehash of the most beloved movie in the franchise; and it was exceptionally bad the way they lifted whole scenes and dialog from that movie. Still ... The movie has some fun moments; and in this current configuration with all of the extras restored it's worth a purchase. (Glad I skipped the first "release".)
 

Forum Sponsors

Forum statistics

Threads
344,460
Messages
4,710,689
Members
141,274
Latest member
Bats8711