Stacking Subs on top of one another?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Martice, Nov 2, 2001.

  1. Martice

    Martice Screenwriter

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    Theoretically, is it wrong to stack 2 subs on top of one another in one corner?
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    What if it gets no better than this!?!
     
  2. Jeffrey Noel

    Jeffrey Noel Screenwriter

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    Martice, from what I've read, it is not bad to stack one sub on top of another. You just want to make sure that they are secure.
    It seems that having subs in the same corner will sound better. I'm new at this, so maybe this is a pointless reply?! [​IMG]
    Oh well, just count on Jack Gilvey to give you the best info.
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  3. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    Technically, I can't see much of a problem from stacking them (other than stability - make sure they don't rattle each other over).
    The only drawback might be is if you have any dead spots in your listening area from room modes, you probably wont be solving any of those problems with stacking.
    Ideally, they should be placed in the front left and right corners to fill out the listening area more evenly.
    Overall I would say, if you have room, separate 'em. I think you'll be much more satisfied with the sound.
    -=DP=-
     
  4. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    I'd have to disaggree Dave. I think stacking is considered the ideal option. When they are stacked you know they will couple properly and give you as close to possible that ideal extra 6dB of headroom. But for appearance or space reasons it usually isn't done. If you put a sub in each corner you have to deal with a lot of phase cancellation issues.
    Granted stacking two subs in a none ideal location doesn't solve room mode problems, but putting a sub in each corner won't necessarily either. Ideally I think you would find the best location for one sub. Hopefully no room modes, but if they are there you want them to cause peaks not valleys. Then you stack the second sub ontop, level adjust and use an EQ to kill the peaks if any.
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    [Edited last by Dustin B on November 02, 2001 at 04:55 PM]
     
  5. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Martice,
    Stacking two subs in the same corner is typically the best way to place them in a room. If they are placed separately, the half-way point between them functions like a boundary (i.e., a wall) and there is cancellation at a specific frequency. Stacking them maximized output and extension and actually reduces the effect of room modes.
    There will be one or two response peaks, but this is natural. However, if you eliminate them with a parametric equalizer you will have the best of everything—the maximum output, the lowest extension, and the smoothest response. Win, win, win!
    I used to have my two subs separated, one in a corner and one not. I regularly had problems with them bottoming out during heavy action scenes. When I put them together maximum output increased by at least 6dB—basically, two separated functioned no better than if I had only one. After EQ I easily have response to 20Hz now, something I was not able to achieve before. Now I never bottom them out, and the depth charger scenes in U-571 vibrate the couch like I had some of those bass shakers!
    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
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    [Edited last by Wayne A. Pflughaupt on November 02, 2001 at 06:43 PM]
     
  6. Jeffrey Noel

    Jeffrey Noel Screenwriter

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    Wayne,
    Sorry to get off topic, but do you have any pics of your two Shiva DIY subs? I'm going to start my own DIY Shiva+Passive Radiator sub.
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    jeffrey noel
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  7. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Sorry, Jeff, I don’t.
    Mine are no big deal, really. I had a couple of old large tower speakers with 10” woofs and 12” passive radiators. The 10’s were blow, and they were about the right size, so I gutted them and dropped in the Shivas. Quick and dirty.
    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
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  8. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    Really? Stacking is preferred to using them as a stereo pair?
    I figured that cross cancellation wouldn't be an issue. Since the wavelengths we're dealing with are long enough that one would have to be sitting quite off center of the listening/viewing area before the subs would be significantly out of phase with one another. And, you would have the additional benefit of operating them in stereo.
    But, if it's sheer volume your looking for, stacking is the way to go.
    -=D=-
     

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