Splitting audio - Important Question....

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Matt*B, Mar 22, 2005.

  1. Matt*B

    Matt*B Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey all,

    I just set up one of these (http://www.kb-electronics.com/aw-811.html) in my Grandma's house -- and it works flawlessly! (how many Grandma's do you know that want streaming internet audio throughout their entire house...haha) However, her computer, although brand new, doesn't have a dedicated audio line out. The two outputs available in the sound card are speaker out (doesn't SAY speaker out, but it's the icon with the arrow pointing out of the sound wave) and a headphone out.

    Now, ideally, I would have liked to plug this unit into the line out so that we could have the regular computer speakers working at the same time as this unit. For now, however, when she wants to use the wireless speaker, she just plugs the transmitter into the headphone jack (luckily, it's in front of the tower). This, obviously cuts the computer audio from the regular speakers. N

    Now, I was thinking about putting a splitter into the rear speaker out jack, and having the regular speakers in one jack, and the wireless transmitter in the other. However, the manual strictly states not to plug the transmitter directly into the speaker output jack, and to only use line-out or the headphones jack because using the speaker out will cause permanent damage to the transmitter.

    So, my question is

    1) What’s really the problem with using a splitter and plugging this in the speaker out (i know i may lose a bit of volume, but i can compensate i am sure)?

    2) if i am able, according to you guys, to use a splitter in the speaker out without damaging the transmitter, would this be the best solution? The splitter could be a simple $3 headphone splitter from R. Shack, right? It wouldn't have to be amplified, would it?

    3) Is there a way to tell the computer/soundcard NOT to cut out the regular computer audio when something is plugged into the headphone jack? If this is an option, everything would be solved.

    I hope the situation is clear now.... I look forward to your responses....

    Thanks,

    Matt!
     
  2. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    What reason does the manual give when it says not to plug the transmitter into the speaker out? That does't make any sense to me.

    I would think that a cheap replacement soundcard would be a good fix. You should be able to find one with multiple line outs fairly inexpensively ($20 or $30)
     
  3. Matt*B

    Matt*B Stunt Coordinator

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  4. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    I still don't understand the difference between the speaker and line level outputs of a computer. It seems to me that the headphone output would be the one that could damage it since it has a small amount of amplification on it where the line and speaker outputs don't.

    At any rate, I guess you should abide by the manual warnings (though I think I would call tech support and ask specific questions). I guess another soundcard with seperate line out and speaker outputs would be a good solution.
     

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