SPL meter Accuracy on SUB's Question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by MikeDierbeck, Aug 5, 2002.

  1. MikeDierbeck

    MikeDierbeck Agent

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    Hi-

    I have the Radio Shack Digital Meter. I just got the SVS 20-39PCi and am trying to decide how to correctly calibrate it.

    I have the Sub in the corner, and am getting a fairly good response that varies between about 2-3dB, which is the best I've gotten so far.

    However, I have heard that the Radio Shack Meter (don't know if this is the same with the Digital) is actually about 3dB too high when calibrating the subwoofer. Now, when it comes to those really powerful bassy movies (you all know which ones they are...Fight Club, T2, etc), I don't watch them any more than 5dB from reference level. Maybe 4dB if I'm really in the mood for a blast. For those regular Dolby Digital mixes, I watch anywhere from reference to 3-6dB below it. So, to hear all the best quality from SVS w/o blowing the sub itself, what would be the measurement using the AVIA test tones. Right now, my SPL reads between 85 and 87, which is actually 88-90dB is that correct? So then I am running it 3-5dB hot...should I Lower it a dB or to, raise it a dB or two...? I can maybe get the respones to be withing two dB. I've read to do put the sub a few dB higher than the rest of the chanels, then I read on a couple threads to put it 4-5 dB lower than the rest, because of the SPL Meter accuracy error.

    Any help would be appreciated..

    Mike
     
  2. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Real Name:
    Neil Joseph
  3. Ned

    Ned Supporting Actor

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    If you set it to 3-5db under your mains it'll barely be doing anything when the LFE hits. The SPL needle will swing about 3db, set it so the middle of that swing is ~87.

    For movies I rarely adjust the LFE. For music, the most that mine needs is +/- 1db to balance with the mains. The occasional movie is too "thick" and I'll lower it maybe 2db for that.
     
  4. MikeDierbeck

    MikeDierbeck Agent

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    Thanks for the reply. I went and calibrated the SVS to where it went between 86 and 88 and I'll see how that does when I pop in a DVD tonight. I have my sub in a corner 16 feet away...maybe it's too far away, I don't know, but that's the only corner available and it is only one foot to the right of my right main speaker so I think my location is good.

    Any other tips from anybody else would be appreciated. Especially those who are happy with their sub measurement for your SVS and would like to share with me what you have yours set to.

    Thanks

    Mike
     
  5. Phil Iturralde

    Phil Iturralde Screenwriter

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    ====
    AUGUST - REF Marks:
    Video Essentials:
    ·VOLUME KNOB = DOT (between -16* & -12*) / Video Essentials @ 75 dB
    ·HT Speakers = 75 dB (± 1/8 dB)
    ·SVS = 81 dB (lowest swing 79 dB / highest swing 83 dB)
    Equipment final settings:
    oYamaha RX-V995
    ·SWFT = -11 (range: 0 to -20)
    ·DD LFE = -5 (range: 0 to -10)
    ·DTS LFE = +5 (range: -10 to +10)
    oSVS 25-31PCi
    ·Level: ½ power (12 o'clock position)
    ·Crossover = Disabled
    ====
    So, over time, my entire HT Setup (speakers & sub settings) changed.
    FYI: REF MARKS - Yamaha RX-V995 Analog Volume Control Locations vs. 3 different Calibration Sources:
    Dolby Digital 5.1
    ·VOLUME KNOB = DOT (between -16* & -12*) / Video Essentials @ 75 dB
    ·VOLUME KNOB = DOT (between -20* & -16*) / Yamaha Internal Test Tones @ 75 dB
    ·VOLUME KNOB = -12* / Sound & Vision @ 85 dB
    DTS 5.1
    ·VOLUME KNOB = -16* / Sound & Vision @ 85 dB
    *My Yamaha RX-V995 uses dB Scale increments with their Analog Volume Control Knob
    -20 dB = 11 o'clock position
    -16 dB = 12 o'clock position
    -12 dB = 1 o'clock position
    Phil
     

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