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SPHE Press Release: Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (4k UHD) (Blu-ray)

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Ronald Epstein, Mar 20, 2017.

  1. Ronald Epstein

    Ronald Epstein Founder
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    [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    “They’ve saved the best for last” ~ Chris Parente, FOX-TV
    “A nonstop roller coaster ride” ~ Jimmy O, JOBLO
    “Jovovich delivers a kickass performance” ~ Bill Zwecker, CHICAGO SUN TIMES

    The Epic Conclusion to the Highest Grossing
    Video Game Film Franchise of All Time


    RESIDENT EVIL:

    THE FINAL CHAPTER

    Finish the Fight on Digital May 2
    On 4K Ultra HD™/Blu-ray™ Combo Pack, Blu-ray™ & DVD May 16


    Including the Interactive “Retaliation Mode,” Behind-the-Scenes Featurettes & a Sneak Peek of the Upcoming CGI Film Resident Evil: Vendetta

    CULVER CITY, Calif. (Mar. 20, 2017) – RESIDENT EVIL: THE FINAL CHAPTER, the sixth and final installment in the worldwide franchise phenomenon, premieres on digital May 2 and 4K Ultra HD™/Blu-ray™Combo Pack, Blu-ray™ and DVD May 16 from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. Milla Jovovich (Resident Evilfranchise) is back as the iconic zombie slayer Alice, who is forced to return to The Hive, where her story began. The Umbrella Corporation is gathering its undead forces for a final strike against the survivors of the apocalypse and Alice must prevent complete human extinction before it’s too late. Returning with Jovovich are franchise regulars Ali Larter (Final Destination), Shawn Roberts (Resident Evil: Retribution) and Iain Glen (“Game of Thrones”), alongside all-new cast members Ruby Rose (“Orange is the New Black”), Eoin Macken (“The Night Shift”) and William Levy (The Single Moms Club).

    Bonus materials on the RESIDENT EVIL: THE FINAL CHAPTER Blu-ray, 4K Ultra HD, DVD and digital releases include two behind-the-scenes featurettes: In “Explore the Hive,” fans receive a deeper understanding of the Hive and what Alice and her team endured to save mankind; and in “The Badass Trinity & The Women of Resident Evil,” the female heroes discuss how their roles empower women everywhere. Bonus materials on the Blu-ray, 4K Ultra HD and digital releases include: a sneak peek at the upcoming CG animated feature Resident Evil: Vendetta; a featurette exploring the “Stunts & Weaponry” highlighted in the film; and “Retaliation Mode,” a way for fans to extend their movie watching experience. Viewers can turn on “Retaliation Mode” and enjoy more than 30 minutes with Milla Jovovich and director Paul W.S. Anderson where the pair break down pivotal scenes from the movie and discuss the world of Resident Evil.

    Synopsis:
    Picking up after Resident Evil: Retribution, Alice (Milla Jovovich) is the only survivor of what was meant to be humanity’s final stand against the undead. Now, she must return to where the nightmare began – The Hive in Raccoon City, where the Umbrella Corporation is gathering its forces for a final strike against the only remaining survivors of the apocalypse.

    Written and Directed by Paul W.S. Anderson, RESIDENT EVIL: THE FINAL CHAPTER is produced by Jeremy Bolt, Paul W.S. Anderson, Robert Kulzer and Samuel Hadida; with Martin Moszkowicz and Victor Hadida serving as executive producers.

    Blu-ray, 4K Ultra HD, DVD & Digital Bonus Materials Include:
    • Two Featurettes:
      • “Explore the Hive”
      • “The Badass Trinity & The Women of Resident Evil
    Blu-ray, 4K Ultra HD and Digital Bonus Materials Include:
    • Retaliation Mode
    • Sneak Peek: Resident Evil: Vendetta
    • “Stunts & Weaponry” Featurette
    ABOUT SONY PICTURES HOME ENTERTAINMENT
    Sony Pictures Home Entertainment (SPHE) is a Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) company. Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) is a subsidiary of Sony Entertainment Inc., a subsidiary of Tokyo-based Sony Corporation. SPE’s global operations encompass motion picture production, acquisition and distribution; television production, acquisition and distribution; television networks; digital content creation and distribution; operation of studio facilities; and development of new entertainment products,services and technologies. For additional information, go to http://www.sonypictures.com.

    RESIDENT EVIL: THE FINAL CHAPTER has a run time of approximately 106 minutes and has an R rating for sequences of violence throughout.

    Thank you for supporting HTF when you preorder using the link below. If you are using an adblocker you will not see link.

     
  2. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Lead Actor
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    No 3D in the combo? That's kinda shocking from Sony, especially considering the movie was a native 3D production.
     
  3. Jesse Skeen

    Jesse Skeen Producer

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    Won't be buying this.
     
  4. Bryan^H

    Bryan^H Producer

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    Just a hunch, but I think from here on we don't see anymore 3D from Sony on home video.
     
  5. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Lead Actor
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    I'm worried you may be right.

    For now, Amazon UK has a 3D for preorder due out in June. I'd actually like to get this in 3D, so fingers crossed that the UK edition doesn't get cancelled.
     
  6. Jeff Cooper

    Jeff Cooper Screenwriter

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  7. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Lead Actor
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    Yeah, sadly, this has been known for a while. Before the title was officially announced, preliminary artwork suggested this would be a 4K+3D combo (same with the latest Underworld movie). But when the official press releases came out, there was no mention about 3D, and the artwork was replaced with a version that did not include it.

    Since this has happened for two Sony releases in a row, it seems possible if not likely that Sony has now abandoned the format in the U.S., which Passengers counting as their last domestic 3D home release.

    Fortunately, it is still scheduled for release in the UK - I am uncertain if that is region-free or not, but since I can play all regions, I will be ordering from there:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Resident-Evil-Chapter-Blu-ray-Similar/dp/B01NAYNI77/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1493327047&sr=8-1&keywords=resident+evil+3d

    The fact that we are having a working technology being taken away from us is troubling. I personally would like to see more discussion about this issue at HTF. If the HTF mission statement is that we're only in support of seeing films as the filmmakers intended, Resident Evil: The Final Chapter was clearly a made-for-3D production (and a natively-shot one). Any 2D-only presentation of this title would not be representative of the filmmakers intentions. Therefore, this should be more of an issue here. Imagine the outcry if studios said, "from now on, we're releasing pan & scan versions only" - that's basically what a 2D version of a 3D movie is.
     
  8. DavidMiller

    DavidMiller Screenwriter
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    While it is interesting, you can't say it is not surprising. The manufactures have stopped supporting 3D so now the producers of the content are going to stop producing it. 3D was a pain at home I had stop using it as well as many others I know.
     
  9. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Lead Actor
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    I'm sorry that your experiences of 3D at home have been a pain, but that hasn't been my experience on any level. If I want to watch a 3D movie at home, I put in the 3D disc, put on the glasses, and it works. The worst problem I've ever run into is the battery in the glasses having run out of a charge between viewings, and the glasses I have can charge enough to watch a 2 hour movie in under 5 minutes, so I wouldn't consider that an issue. I respect everyone's right to enjoy the format type of their choice, but I don't think it's accurate to say that 3D was a pain at home as a universal description.

    And regardless of all of that, I think this is worthy of discussion. The point I made above seems to be missed. HTF has a mission statement. That mission statement says HTF supports films being released and viewed as the filmmakers originally intended. In the case of this specific film, that intention is 3D. 3D is a technology that is currently available at home. The film was shot digitally, and a digital master already exists. The film is being released in 3D internationally, so a disc has already been authored. But in the U.S., we're no longer allowed to see this title as the filmmakers intended. There was a time when HTF wouldn't go near a pan & scan copy of a widescreen movie on principle. I don't even know if I'm asking us all to hold that same principle here. But there are plenty of HTF members who have no interest in seeing it in 3D, and I imagine the 2D version will receive an official HTF review. So I just wonder if the mission statement that HTF has really holds true anymore - if we're buying and reviewing the 2D version of this movie, expressing preferences to watch it in 2D instead of 3D, it would seem to be -- and this isn't mean to be insulting -- that we're no longer supporting, or at least no longer insisting, on the release of films as the filmmakers originally intended. And if we're not going to be insisting on that anymore, I think it's worth a discussion and perhaps the mission statement should be amended.
     
  10. Jeff Cooper

    Jeff Cooper Screenwriter

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    I'd be interested in knowing why 3D was such a pain for you. Just having to wear the glasses in general? I could see that if you already wear glasses, and don't have contacts. I don't wear glasses so it is always a painless and very easy process for me.

    As far as HTF support, since it was released in theaters as a 2D version as well as 3D then I don't see it as that big of a deal. You've got to draw a line somewhere. Filmmakers intent is for us to see it on a giant screen in the theater, so any presentation at home is not the filmmakers intent. So should HTF not support any physical media release?

    But I'm sad about 3D for this film, because it wasn't a conversion, and it's bizzare to have to watch it in 2D when the last two I watch in 3D.
     
  11. Bob Cashill

    Bob Cashill Producer

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    Interesting. I can see how a natively shot 3D movie is the "official" version of a movie, but what about a conversion? (And most are conversions.)
     
  12. Bob Cashill

    Bob Cashill Producer

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    Friends who saw it in 3D said it was quite a letdown after the last two, but that's neither here nor there.
     
  13. DavidMiller

    DavidMiller Screenwriter
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    Yes, I wear glasses... I even ordered a few after market versions. None ever worked very well and the battery issues drove me nuts. The non-rechargeable ones ate batteries even if I was carful and turned them off. The rechargeable ones wouldn't hold a charge after about a year. I liked 3D in the beginning and used it a lot but... It just became an ordeal every time I went to do it that it was easier to just do 2D. Now that I'm watching 4K UHD discs that put the final nail in the coffin.
     
  14. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Lead Actor
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    My line might be in a different place than others, but I think the conversation about where to draw it is a worthy one. I think the difference in your analogy and mine is that when you view a 2D film in theaters and then view it at home in 2D, you're seeing all of the visual information available in both presentations. Obviously your home screen is smaller, but all of the content is there.

    If you listen to a movie in Dolby Atmos in the theater, but then watch it at home in 5.1 surround or stereo instead, all of sounds that are in the Dolby Atmos version are still there, they've just been moved into fewer speakers. But the content is all there.

    But if you see a movie in 3D in the theaters, and then watch it at 2D at home, 50% of the picture information is gone. It has not been folded down into another channel. It is not just a smaller version of what you saw in the theater - it is missing 50% of the visual information. I do not think losing 50% of the visual information is acceptable.

    I do wear glasses, and I have no trouble wearing 3D glasses over my regular glasses. If anything, I think the fact that I'm used to having something on my face 24/7 to begin with makes it a lot easier for me to accept having 3D glasses on my face. I'm used to wearing glasses already so it doesn't really change the equation.

    To me, the most deluxe version of a film offered in theaters is the "official" version, and everything else is a compromise. I think conversions can very easily be the "official" version. Take a movie like "The Walk" or "Gravity" or "Guardians Of The Galaxy" - those movies were always intended for 3D. 3D was part of the conversation from the days of scripting and pre-production, and the filmmakers decided to go with a conversion rather than native photography because they felt a conversion was the better tool to achieve the look they were aiming for.

    I saw it in 3D and I enjoyed it. I wouldn't call it a letdown. I will say that more of this film takes place at night than the other films, and the darker photography means that some of the dimensionality seems less pronounced in those moments. But I have to believe that was an intentional choice, since the director has shot several films in native 3D and is familiar with the format.
     
  15. Jeff Cooper

    Jeff Cooper Screenwriter

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    While I am upset that the 3D version isn't avalable, I certainly do not feel that 50% of the movie is missing. On a technical level, that 'missing' 50% is a near duplicate of the other 50%. When watching a pan n scan movie, information is just straight gone, you will never see it. When watching 2D vs. 3D your still seeing the same information, its just in a different space. In fact going from 3D to 2D, which you are opposed to, is pretty much anagulous to going from Atmos to 5.1, which you say is ok.

    Also if you are arguing for filmmakers intent, then you can't say that the most 'deluxe' version in the cinema is the 'official' one. They can be mutually exclusive. There are tons of examples of movies that were converted to 3D by the studios for an extra buck, that were never intended to be 3D by the director.
     
  16. Josh Steinberg

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    I don't feel that's a fair analogy. Each eye view is different from the other; when one is gone, 50% of the picture information is missing. I'll agree that the picture information in both eyes is similar, but I don't think it's identical. The difference for me, in an Atmos track, let's say there's a scene with the sound of a bee buzzing around. If you watch the movie in Atmos, you hear the bee flying overhead. If you watch it in surround, you hear the bee to the sides and behind. If you watch it in stereo or mono, you hear it in front of you. But either way, you hear it. When I watch a 3D movie in 2D, the perspective has changed. Maybe I can see a little bit behind objects in the 3D version, and I can't in 2D. There's a depth to the image that's obviously gone in 2D. I apologize if my description sounds vague for this next part, but when I watch a 3D movie, my brain engages the material differently. It looks different and it feels different to me. And when I watch a 2D version after having seen the 3D version, the 2D looks wrong to me, and I can't enjoy the movie. This is not ideal and not me being picky for the sake of being picky. When I tried watching Star Wars: The Force Awakens in 2D at home after seeing it in theaters half a dozen times in 3D (since it didn't come out on BD3D right away), it just never looked right to me. I noticed everything I was missing. I'm willing to believe that for whatever reason 3D has a greater impact on me than it does with some other people. But for me, I think it's completely accurate to say that when I listen to a Dolby Atmos movie mixed down to 5.1, I'm still hearing all of the sounds, which makes it okay, vs. seeing a 3D movie in 2D, where I feel that I'm not seeing all of the picture, which makes it not okay.

    But, and I think this is key, I said that "filmmakers" does not always mean the director. There are definitely cases where the studio insists a film be in 3D even if the director is indifferent or against that idea. But aren't the studio people filmmakers? In the case of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the parameters that all filmmakers are given to work with is that the film must be in 3D. Before the director is even hired, the studio has decided they are making a 3D movie. The director might not like that idea, but he's not the final word on it. So I am arguing for filmmakers intent, but I'm using filmmakers as a plural and not limiting that to just the director.
     
  17. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Lead Actor
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    Jeff, for what it's worth, I very much appreciate the conversation :)
     
  18. bujaki

    bujaki Cinematographer

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    Keep in mind that a person who has lost sight in one eye is unable to watch a movie in 3D; so in fact, "one eye" of the information, which would provide depth perception or outward projection, is missing.
     
  19. Jeff Cooper

    Jeff Cooper Screenwriter

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    Yep, me too. It's nice to have a discussion, rather than personal attacks.

    In response, I would say that in exactly the same way you mention how you still hear the bee in a downmixed track, it's just the positioning that changes, describes very perfectly why it's a direct analogy to 3D vs 2D.
    Take for instance a 3D scene of a bee. And there's a flower. Now change that to 2D. You're still seeing the bee and the flower. You still see all the same objects in the same way that you still hear the bee in your example. The only thing that's lost is the positioning in the 3D plane, just like the positioning of the sound in your audio example.

    If you see something in real life (3D) and then take a picture of it (2D), are you losing 50 percent of the information?
     

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