Speaker Watt Ratings

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by wally, May 23, 2005.

  1. wally

    wally Second Unit

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    I’ve been planning on purchasing the Denon 2105 for a basement project I’m working on. Because of a store liquidation sale this week-end, I was able to upgrade to the 2805 for less than had budgeted for the 2105. Without thinking, I jumped at it.

    My question is I’ll be driving Klipsch RS-25s as my surrounds. They are listed at 75 watts and the Denon is listed at 100 watts per channel. I’ve got a Denon upstairs that I rarely turn up past –10dB. Am I in any serious danger of frying these surrounds?
     
  2. Dean_S

    Dean_S Second Unit

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    You'll be fine. Most speakers will handle "clean" signal far past their rating and surround channels will rarely (if ever) use all the power available on the revr for that channel.
     
  3. John S

    John S Producer

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    yeah.. sort of an oddity here... the truly underpowered AVR attempting to reach loud volume levels, actually have a way higher chance of fry'n your speakers.

    Should be fine. Now I listen loud a lot, and I mean loud. I probably wouldn't want to do it. I'd surely fry them. [​IMG]
     
  4. Victor Ferguson

    Victor Ferguson Stunt Coordinator

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    I would not worry about it at all. Manufacture ratings for recievers and speakers are rarely if ever accurate. Like the previous poster said, underpowering speakers and driving them with a clipping amp will do far more damage than running extra watts through them.
     
  5. Michael R Price

    Michael R Price Screenwriter

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    The ratings for speakers also mean very little. Ignore the specific power ratings and trust your common sense: heavier components and larger speakers are usually more powerful, and any noticeable distortion is a sign of the equipment's limitations that you shouldn't try to surpass.
     
  6. wally

    wally Second Unit

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    Thanks everyone. Now just to get the kids to respect the equipment.
     
  7. Dave Lindhorst

    Dave Lindhorst Stunt Coordinator

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    Just install a 1/2 amp quick blow fuse in the positive line of the speakers and the kids will have no choice but to keep it reasonable or no sound. Why did the manufacturers stop putting fuses in the speakers anyway?
     

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