Speaker Surround Repair Help

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kendal Kirk, Sep 26, 2001.

  1. Kendal Kirk

    Kendal Kirk Stunt Coordinator

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    My Cervin Vega 2000-15 speakers have served me will for 16 years, and have no desire to replace them. Last night I noticed that one of the 15" woofer surrounds has a slight tear. I know what would happen if left untreated, but am not sure which remedy to take.
    Would there be a problem with using silicon to repair it or should I just replace both surrounds with a kit from Parts Express?
    If I take the replacement option, any tips that you could provide would be appreciated.
     
  2. NathanP

    NathanP Supporting Actor

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    Hey man,
    If it's just a slight tear don't bother going through any trouble replacing the surround.
    Alot of Music Stores/Audio Shops and maybe your local Best Buy or Radio Shack carry a special liquidy substance that you can squirt on your surround and it seals it right up, good as new..
    Tell me how it turns out,
    Nathan
    ------------------
    "Fascinating Captian"
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    Visit www.speedemenu.com
     
  3. Bob Ahlberg

    Bob Ahlberg Agent

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    Brian...
    At the risk of creating more debate on a "done to death" issue, why are you so set on ignoring anything people from the forum tell you? The gentleman who said your pictures more clearly demonstrate some of the basic problems in your approach was absolutely right!
    Just for sake of argument, consider the following:
    1. These subs are not recommended for a ported box. This means, they will not stand the stresses placed on the suspension of the speaker when the sub nears the tuning frequency of the port. That leads to problem two:
    2. One if not more of your boxes is tuned at a high frequency. Below tuning frequency on a ported box, the subwoofer "unloads." This is demonstarted by wild in and out excursions of the driver leading to a third problem.
    3. You asked about "bottoming out". This is when the driver exceeds it's design/suspension limits and either starts to make a popping noise as it hits the end of it's stroke or else (depending on the design) the voice coil literally jumps out of the slot often damaging the coil and rendering it useless.
    4. You simply can't put one of more ports of unspecified and in this case different from one another lengths and get anywhere near the performance the woofer is capable of. You are committed to using these drivers, don't you want to at least get all that they are capable of doing?
    So what can you do?
    1. You could seal off the ports. It would only play down to 50hz or so before starting to roll of. Still, it would probably sound better than what you are doing now.
    2. Do your homework or ask for help in designing the length of the ports. That driver (while it will NOT sound as clean and will have greatly reduced power handling ability) will work (sort of) in a box tuned to about 30hz. At least download something like Blaubox off the net, and enter the speaker parameters. Tell it what size boxes you are using and it will tell you how many cubic feet you have. Then tell it you have one 5.7" port and it will tell you how long it has to be for various box tunings. By the way, 5.7" is the equivalent in surface area of two 4" ports which is what you have.
    The only thing I can figure is that either you are absolutely determined to make these things sound bad (as long as they are loud) or you are having a high old time yanking everyones chain. In either event, you seem to be succeeding.
    Well, I did try...
    Bob
    [Edited last by Bob Ahlberg on September 26, 2001 at 04:22 PM]
     
  4. Kendal Kirk

    Kendal Kirk Stunt Coordinator

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    I guess since I didn't receive any additional advice, that I was on my own with this one. Well, last night I applied a "super pliable" silicone purchased from Home Depot. The tears were on both speakers, and one was about 3 inches long!!! I didn't think that it would work well, but after testing this morning, there is no noticable stress where I did the repair.
    Over time, I am sure that there will be added stress on the surround which has not been treated, but I will deal with that when it happens.
     

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