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Speaker spikes on hardwood (1 Viewer)

Jake T

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Hi,
I dont want to usa my speaker spikes due to the damage they would do to my wood cabinets.
Anyone have any suggestions.
Thanks,
Jake T
 

Saurav

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Pennies under the spikes usually work pretty well. Or, get different feet.
 

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Jake,
You might try some of those oversized stick-on rubber feet. They are usually good for components, but I think they would be ideal for your situation. On a hardwood floor, they would give a lot of friction and make the speaker hard to move accidentally.
Radio Shack sells them for only a few bucks.
Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

Saurav

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The only problem with rubber feet is that they wouldn't allow the speaker to couple to the floor, which is the point of having spikes in the first place. With the right kind of equipment, this may make a noticable difference to the sound. Of course, in the right kind of room, the speakers might sound better when de-coupled from the floor, so it's a toss-up.
 

Marty M

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I wish I had known about the penny trick before I bought my Paradigm Monitor 7's. The dealer sold me some brass "things" that the spikes rest on. They work very well but cost $15-$20 per set of 4.
 

SimonT

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I left the spikes on my towers because they shook all over the place! (and the towers weigh over 70 lbs. each!) The manufacturer (Phase Technology) highly recommended using the spikes ...they said "they (the spikes)also contribute to deeper, tighter bass." So I left them on...the damage is minimal to my hardwood floors.
------------------
MY HOME THEATER
 

Elliott Willschick

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Pennies can potentially leave indentations on the wood. I use some old tiles which I place on the hardwood with the speaker stands and spikes on top of it.
 

Chris_Campbell

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"Deeper, tighter bass"? hmmm.... Is there any way that you can remove them? My speakers came with little screw holes so that you can switch between the spikes and the plastic pads that come with them. If not, try buying some small rubber feet with a peel off adhesive on the back of them, then stick them on the floor, and put the spikes in them. They are usually a pretty good hardness rubber, so as to damp any movement but yet remain firm with a lot of weight. You can get them at radio shack for a couple bucks, like Wayne said. Good lucks
 

Saurav

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"Deeper, tighter bass"? hmmm....
This isn't necessarily marketing BS. The point of using spikes is to couple the speaker cabinet (through the stands, if they're bookshelf speakers), to the floor. If the floor is concrete or something similarly massive and accoustically inert, this has the effect of transmitting the speaker cabinet's vibrations to the floor. This cleans up the sound of the speaker, because now only the vibrations of the actual driver are transmitted to the air, the vibrations of the cabinet are "conducted away" into the floor.
This technique usually backfires in a room with a springy wooden floor, because then the vibrations transmitted to the floor cause the floor to vibrate, acting as a huge sounding board, and that muddies up the sound much more than if it were just the speaker cabinet vibrating. If the vibrations being transmitted to the floor happen to match the floor's resonant frequency (which will be in the low bass region), the effect is that much worse.
 

SimonT

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Suarav,
This technique usually backfires in a room with a springy wooden floor....
So you think that I should remove the spikes on my towers? What could I use to prevent them from "shaking" all over the place? I have tried small peices of rubber, but by the time I'm half way through a cd, the speakers are pointing in a completely different direction! It's that bad. That's why I left the spikes on. Each tower is around 70 lbs., has a 1" tweeter, a 6" titanium mid, and a 10" powered woofer. I'm not sure if I'm noticing a difference in sound quality (w/ spikes on)....I'm thinking it might be a placebo effect from what the company told me about the tighter bass response with the spikes on. (I have hardwood floors throughout my house). Thanks for your help.
------------------
MY HOME THEATER
 

Darrel McBane

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I just got a pair of the Revel F-30s this week and their spikes are blunt on one end and pointed on the other. For the use on hardwood and carpeted floors. You may be able to reverse the spikes on yours as well or contact a HIFI store which may have some that can be used. I would think most speakers use the same threaded holes. And the spikes from one company to the other can be interchanged.
Just a thought?!
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[Edited last by Darrel McBane on July 14, 2001 at 03:59 PM]
 

Brian OK

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...... try Vibrapods. Select the appropriate model # based upon the weight of your speaker (mine happen to be Paradigm Monitor 7's). I used 6 pods (Model #2, if I recall ) -- 4 on each corner, with 2 centered on middle edge, and ......voila. Bass punch returned. A very noticable improvement.
Beats the spikes and pennies I had used for over a year on my hardwoods. Granted, my hardwood floor was not "springy", but it sure improved the bass response I was getting from the spikes.
At $5.99 ea., worth a listen.
Good Luck,
BOK
 

Kimmo Jaskari

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This seems like the right thread to ask...
What is the benifit of using spikes and then adding a penny or something underneath them?
Wouldn't it be just as easy to just use any old foot that is just as thick its whole length as using one that starts out wide at the speakers, narrows to a point near the floor and then widens right back out due to the penny sitting between it and the floor?
I mean, the penny still has a very wide area pressing against the floor, so the speaker should be able to move just as well as it did before you used spikes, surely.
------------------
/Kimmo
 

Saurav

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I think the penny behaves like it's part of the floor, not part of the spike.
 

Allan Jayne

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The constant vibration of the speaker cabinet will always cause spikes to dig into the wood floor unless some protection is put in between.
Rubber padding is not suitable because the spike will puncture it and continue down into the floor.
A penny is really too small to prevent imprinting, a quarter or larger coin would be needed.
Whatever protection you use, it should be inspected often to be sure (1) the spikes have not slipped off, (2) they hasn't deformed causing a dimple or sharp edges to hit the floor underneath, or (3) they haven't cracked or broken.
Other video hints:http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
[Edited last by Allan Jayne on July 16, 2001 at 07:24 AM]
 

MannyE

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I've used spikes on my DefTech towers for three years now. My floor is wood (red oak) and you'd be hard pressed find any marks left by the spikes. Yes they are there, but the are so small that you have to bend down and look for them.
The improvement in bass was not insignificant when I replaced the original feet with the spikes that came supplied with the speakers.
I can see where there could be concern if someone moves the speakers, or on light wood, however.
 

MannyE

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Maybe if you placed a buffer piece of wood between the cabinet surface and the spikes? You could clamp the buffer down from behind so the speakers would hide the clamps. Depending on how heavy they are, you may only need a very thin piece of wood. just make sure that the buffer is somehow tightly connected to the cabinet.
Good luck!
 

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