speaker size and x-over settings

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by AndrewKra, May 28, 2005.

  1. AndrewKra

    AndrewKra Agent

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    i got a speaker package from circuit city. http://www.circuitcity.com/ssm/Onkyo...oductDetail.do
    I was wondering if i should set the speaker sizes to large or small and what i need to set the crossover frequency at on my receiver. i can choose from 100, 150 and 200
     
  2. AndrewKra

    AndrewKra Agent

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    somebody please reply
     
  3. Brian L

    Brian L Cinematographer

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    Those look pretty small...

    Without specs its a guess, but I would start with 150 and see how that works. Oh, and its a no brainer to set them to small...no way those little guys can do full range, which is what "large" would ask them to do.

    At that frequency, you will probably want to stick the sub between the main L/R pair, or it will surely call attention to itself.

    Brian
     
  4. AndrewKra

    AndrewKra Agent

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    i have 2 subs set up on the right and left sides outside of the main speakers. i dont notice much difference yet between 100 and 150 or 200 yet. i guess my ears arent tuned in to that kind of detail yet. but it sounds pretty good on 100 so far. what should i look for if the speakers cant handle a frequency that low? distortion? vibration?
     
  5. Brian L

    Brian L Cinematographer

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    If you ask a loudspeaker to play lower than it can go, it may not really hurt anything; it just won't do it. That assumes you are not pushing to absurd levels. I suppose it could distort, but I think the likelihood of damage is remote.

    Back in the day before any of us knew what a sub was, we never worried too much about sending low bass to a loudspeaker that was unable to handle it. Well, I didn't worry about it, in any event.

    Another more likely thing to happen is that there will be a gap between what the satellites can play and what the sub can play.

    Lets say the satellites can only play down to 150 Hz, but you crossover at 100 Hz. The sub hopefully we be OK up to 100 Hz but the satellite can't get down that low. Thus there would be a hole in the frequency response.

    Now, crossovers are not brick walls, so the sub may still be contributing some above the crossover, and the satellite will likely be able to play a bit below its low end spec, but still there would be a gap.

    Whether you here it or not will depend on the source recording.

    What you can do if you want to invest some time and a little money is get a CD with test tones, and also a Radio Shack SPL meter (about $35). You can then play the test tones, and map out the in room frequency response.

    Its a bit crude, but it should tell you if there is a serious trough between the sats and the sub.

    Do you have any specs for the speaker system you have? That would probably be a good indicator of how low the sats can go, which would point you toward the best crossover setting.

    Brian
     
  6. AndrewKra

    AndrewKra Agent

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    there is some specs on the link i provided on my first message
     

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