speaker outpot

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Nir, Jun 27, 2003.

  1. Nir

    Nir Auditioning

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    questions....

    i have a b&w 10inch sub. but im not sure how to set up the av. i use 2 large front speaker [jbl hls 620] and im not sure how to set the speaker size. should it be on large or small speaker setting? what is the actuall difference between these 2 modes and how much of an effect does it really have, or in other words , does it make that much of a differnce?

    2. how important is it to place the speakers on a carpet?
     
  2. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    Most recommendations are to set all speakers to ‘small’. But you can experiment and determine what works best for you.
    Here is the way this is supposed to work—I’m not particularly familiar with your equipment, but this will be mostly correct.

    Setting speakers to ‘large’ sends all the bass designated on that channel to that speaker and none to the subwoofer. So setting all speakers to ‘large’ will result in only the Low Frequency Effects (LFE), such as explosions to the subwoofer. Now this is not necessarily a bad thing, so long as your other speakers can reproduce down to around 20–40hz with no roll-off. As a good many of us do not have such speakers, we set those speakers to ‘small’.

    The ‘small’ setting sends frequencies below a certain point to the sub in addition to the LFE channel. My main, center and surround speakers all being to roll-off at about 60hz (in my room) so I have set all my speakers to small. This sends all of the LFE plus all of the lower bass to the sub. You can usually select where you want the cutoff to be when you select small. This selection will be made by where your main speakers begin to roll off and the range where your sub produces the best.

    In practice this will be around 80–100hz for most systems.

    The benefits are that your main speakers do not have to struggle in producing sounds in the range of 20-90hz and will probably produce cleaner, more detailed sound for the rest of the audio spectrum. Not setting the cutoff too high (i.e. 200hz) will allow the sub to only reproduce sounds in its optimal range.

    In the end, just see what works best with your system and in your room.
     
  3. JamesCB

    JamesCB Second Unit

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    Hi Nir,
    I'd like to chime in about your #2 question. In my opinion, no speakers should be allowed to rest on the carpet. If they are floorstanding or bookshelf on stands, you MUST stabilize them with spikes on the bottom. A speaker resting on an unstable media such as a carpet will rock back and forth, which will degrade the sound quality. I'm sure many others will agree with me, and I feel it makes a huge difference. ALL speakers should be solid in their set up.
     

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