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Soundproofing exisiting room for HT?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Scott Wong, Aug 27, 2004.

  1. Scott Wong

    Scott Wong Second Unit

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    I did a search but didn't come up with anything quite this specific that I was looking for.

    My girlfriend and I just bought our first home... *yay!* [​IMG] Anyway, it's a townhome. It's 2-bedrooms. 1.5 bathrooms. And the most important area is a cool little loft that measures 13' x 8'. Not very large by any means but perfect enough for my modest home theater. The loft upstairs is what I am referring to. It overlooks the living area downstairs and is actually kinda cool.

    My question is this: One of the common walls we happen to share with our neighbor is the largest one that runs right down the back of the loft and down into the living area downstairs. Is it possible at all to soundproof an exisiting wall when the walls and construction already exist?? Are there materials that one can buy? I know I won't be able to have the volume up as loud as I would probably like, but anything to help keep the sound down and remain courteous to my neighbor would be appreciated.

    Thanks...
     
  2. Scott Wong

    Scott Wong Second Unit

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    No one? [​IMG]
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Scott, look for my post on this thread. It has some info on soundproofing that will get started. Take a look at it and get back to us here if you have more questions.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Scott Wong

    Scott Wong Second Unit

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    I think after reading that post, I'm realizing I don't have a lot of options. I don't believe modifying any of the current walls is going to be allowed due to the fact that I am in a townhome. I guess I don't know of any... or can't think of any ways I can soundproof a room **without** having to modify a wall in some way.

    I may just be out of luck on this one.
     
  5. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    If you use sound absorbing panels to control the acoustics in the room you will be able to listen at lower volumes happily. This is certainly not a means of soundproofing, but you will find that the sound will clear up when you get rid of most of the reflections and you no longer need to turn it up as loud to enjoy it.
     
  6. Conrad Ebel

    Conrad Ebel Agent

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    You can get soundboard from Home Depot and just tack them to your existing walls. You can paint it, or cover it with fabric. It has some pretty good sound absorbing properties, and will help out with the sound bleeding over into the other dwelling. It's not the perfect solution, but it may help in your case. I think they come in 4x8 sheets and are 1/2" thick. When you move, you can just take them down and take them with you (for your new dedicated HT [​IMG] ).
     
  7. David Cotton

    David Cotton Auditioning

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    You could also look into double sheet-rocking the common wall (not the best but it will help) Since you cont isolate the wall from your neighbor, increasing the mass of the wall will help absorb sound and reduce transmission of vibrations etc. The other option though I am not sure how effective (cost or otherwise) would be to cover the wall in a layer of dynamat type material to help absorb the low bass vibrations. Not sure but I may try a layer of dynamat before I hang my second layer of sheetrock.

    David
     
  8. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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