Soundproofing ceiling

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Greg Foan, Mar 19, 2002.

  1. Greg Foan

    Greg Foan Stunt Coordinator

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    Hello All,

    Yesterday was the day that I finally started my HT......almost 1 year behind schedule. I'm looking for ideas on how best to reduce sound transfer to the upstairs livingroom from my basement HT. The joists are now completely exposed which is good......the bad news is that height is at a premium....I can't afford to lose more than 2" in total from the bottom of the joists. I'm awrare that I'll have to put up with some transfer, but would obviously like to keep it at a minimum.

    Thanks,

    Greg
     
  2. Matt Harwood

    Matt Harwood Agent

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    Standard fiberglass insulation is a pretty good noise insulator, and it fits neatly between the joists. I'm just finishing up the drywall portion of my new HT project, and I used some Owens-Corning insulation specifically designed for noise attenuation. It comes in 92 inch long strips 16 inches wide for fitting between the joists. I think there were 12 strips per package, and I was able to do my entire ceiling with one package (about $35 US). The room is 12x20.
    You don't have to give up any headroom to insulate.
    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    I agree with the insulation. Are you doing a drop ceiling or drywall?

    There is a drop ceiling available where the framework attaches directly to the joists instead of being suspended by wires.. giving you "Max Headroom".
     
  4. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

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    I also could not lower mine down too much more, and had limited money to work with so I ran R19 in the joists and 1/2 soundboard and then 1/2 Sheetrock.

    Standing upstairs above the theater I can hear/feel the bass (2 15" subs) but the mids and highs are pretty much non-existent.

    Wes
     
  5. Scott_Rogers

    Scott_Rogers Auditioning

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    Dave, do you have any links and/or more information on drop ceilings that attach to joists? I'm still framing my HT in the basement and would like any info you have on this.
     
  6. Greg Foan

    Greg Foan Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm thinking drywall at this point......drywall & soundboard sounds interesting......thanks guys for all the tips.....and keep 'em coming

    Greg
     
  7. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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  8. Scott Houchin

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    I can't remember the name of the "on joist" ceiling grids, but I recently did my entire basement with it. Unfortunately, I have reservations about recommending it or ever using it again.

    - It is not as easy to put up as the brochure implies

    - If you have any pipes or wires hanging below the joists (I have a few wires and a gas pipe) you will either need to work around them or drop the ceiling down a couple of inches. I decided to screw pieces of 2x2 to the joists to space it down.

    - the system involves a track that you screw to the joists, and a runner piece that you supposedly snap into the track to hold the ceiling tile in from below.

    - It's plastic, so it bends easily. this is both good an bad. The good means that you can be rough with it and you won't get permanent kinds. The bads are many: if the bottom of your joists aren't perfectly level (and they won't be), you will have to shim the track you screw to the joists. You must have that track in with no give at the joists, as it requires a significant amount of force to snap the two pieces together (or get them apart). I ended up keeping one end of the track exposed and then sliding the running into the end instead of snapping it in.

    - Don't plan on getting the tiles out. It is possible, but its going to be very tough. If you need to get to anything above the ceiling, I suggest putting in trap doors in the ceiling grids. I just created a lip by gluing a portion of the track (cut to make an L shape from the C shaped wall mounting pieces) using construction adhesive. That worked very well.

    - The system is significantly more expensive than the traditional suspended ceiling

    In the end, the ceiling does look nice, but I do wish that it was easier to get tiles out. I've been thinking about running some more wire to enable a zone 2 system in by basement, and I'm debating trying to snake through the ceiling or to try and remove some tiles. I don't know what would be more difficult.

    Scott
     

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