sound proofing

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by brad hess, Aug 24, 2004.

  1. brad hess

    brad hess Auditioning

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    hi
    i'm new to home theater, but I have been around car audio for a long time. in cars for sound proofing i have used dynamat for vibration control and dynaliner for resonence control.
    I am now researching sound proofing a HT room and would like to get some opinions on some different products.
    the room will be 30lx15wx14h. total surface area should be around 1320s.f. give or take a little.
    As i have been surfing this forum i have come across the company Acoustiblok. i went to there site and it looks like very good stuff. i emailed Acoustiblok and got a wholesale price list and it was expensive.
    Then i was searching google for sound deading productds and came across soundprooffoam dot com and it has a simalar product Vinyl Barrier for almost half the price RETAIL.
    My questione aer:
    - Are all loaded vinyls made equal?
    - Are there any that are better than others.
    - Has any body used both and noticed a differance?
    - Is the price of that differance worth it
     
  2. MarkRoberts

    MarkRoberts Stunt Coordinator

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    If you do a search here you will find several diy room treatment projects. If you don't mind doing a little work you can save yourself some money. Room treatments are aimed at "high-end" installs where money is rarely a concern so the cost is way higher than what is resonable. It's kinda like Transparent cables. They have 8ft pairs of speaker wire that cost 15k [​IMG] , do think it will really make a 15k improvement?
    Now room treatments I do believe will make a significant improvement but are those companies really doing something "special". I have a hard time believing that there is some "magic" material out there. I would go the diy route. You should find diy bass traps and sound panels if you do a search. If you can't find them just let me know I have some links to some somewhere...[​IMG]
     
  3. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Well you're not in the car audio world now. And unless your HT is made from sheetmetal, resonance control isn't a big issue. Vinyl products are all but useless for HT.

    Also it's a good idea to measure the speakers's response in the room before getting any room treatments.

    BTW vibration and resonance control are the same thing....
     
  4. brad hess

    brad hess Auditioning

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    Hey
    Thanks for your responses. I guess I’m going to have to change the way I look at home theater budget compared to car theater budget. Where $4,000 would get you a pretty descent car audio system you can't even Acoustiblok a room for that doing it yourself, for wholesale prices [​IMG] .

    TomasW so you are saying that the loaded vinyl that is 1lb per sf that is installed between the studs and drywall is useless for HT. This is a paragraph from their website, and I’m not acoustics major by any means, but it makes since to me that this type of vinyl would help keep sound waves from passing through to the other rooms.

    This is an excerpt from there webpage:
    "Today’s construction techniques leave much to be desired in these areas. The best acoustic isolation methods (rooms within rooms) are too costly to be put into the plan at the inception. It is important to understand that contrary to common usage, fiberglass, foam insulation, sound board, or extra layers of drywall do little to stop noise transmission. Even a concrete block wall is not a very good barrier for sound. A solid surface such as drywall, (including multiple layers), or even a block wall will absorb little acoustic energy. Solid ridged materials actually tend to vibrate themselves producing sound on the other side.

    Acoustiblok® however, works as a sheet of soft lead does. It has tremendous density and mass (1 or 2 lb per sq ft), and it is installed loosely when possible; thus it absorbs the acoustic energy far better than solid ridged materials
     
  5. SteveCallas

    SteveCallas Second Unit

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    I'd look into this.

    http://www.quietsolution.com/quietrock.html

    Tests were done with this product vs homasote and quietrock substantially outperformed it for nearly the same cost. Also, you can screw the drywall in right on top of this, so you don't have to do all the work of making a resiliant channel, which is how you use homasote. In my opinion, those acoustic foams are way overpriced.
     
  6. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Brad,

    The preferred construction method for soundproofing is known as “room within a room,” which is how all good recording studios are built. It merely requires more of the standard building materials, although some proprietary products can be used to improve the results. The extra expense (in materials at least) will not even come close to what you’re saying the Acousticblok will cost.

    Here is an old post of mine that describes it:

    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...74#post1928374

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  7. SAlanS

    SAlanS Auditioning

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    Hello Brad,

    I just wanted to answer your questions regarding mass loaded vinyl from what I have researched. I found out from a company called Soundproofing America that most mass loaded vinyls are similar in quality. Most companies are simply carrying the materials produced by a few suppliers. The important issues with mass loaded vinyl seem to be tensile strength, weight and price. The prices at this company for mass loaded vinyl seem to be the lowest that I have been able to find on the internet. I also read their HT soundproofing page which was quite informative. I am considering using the mass loaded vinyl material on my HT room as I like DIY projects.

    Later,

    Alan
     

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