Sound Insulation

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Ray2R, Aug 1, 2003.

  1. Ray2R

    Ray2R Auditioning

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    I currently have a Home Theater system where I enjoy concerts & action movies at rather loud volumns. I currently am a homeowner that is getting ready to build a Patio Home where the next residence is 3 feet away. Both residences will have brick veneer on the wall facing the other.

    Does anyone have a recommendation of what I should do to isolate the sound in our dwelling and prevent the neighbor from having to listen to our movies? I am thinking surely that there is some material that we can put in the wall to insulate our sound.

    If anyone has some experience with construction of this sort I would appreciate your help. Our system will be in the main living area as oppossed to a special room. My wife will not go for anything ON the walls that is designed for this purpose, so I was hoping I could put something IN it during construction.

    Thanks
    Ray
     
  2. Joel X

    Joel X Stunt Coordinator

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    What ever you can do to add mass to it... You will be happy if it is made out of concrete. Need a shear-wall? Or just add some sheets of MDF under the sheet-rock.
     
  3. Jay Mitchosky

    Jay Mitchosky Producer

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    Sound transmission is largely a function of vibration - if you break that connection you will take a huge chunk out sound leaking out (or in).

    It is generally recommended to build a room-within-a-room where you have double stud construction all around (with the studs offset) such that the inner walls do not connect to those on the outside. For the ceiling a new set of joists are hung from the inner frame to isolate from the structure above. Plan for insulation between each stud frame with an air gap between (air is a poor transmitter of sound). For added effect double up the drywall inside with the seams offset. Glue and screw everything. Apply caulking or sealant at the joints. Fill the area between the door frame and stud wall with insulating foam. Use an exterior grade or solid core door, preferably with weather stripping or similar barrier. If you must have electrical outlets or such make sure they're sealed, and don't have outlets line up with each other on inner and outer walls.

    Done right a room can be completely isolated and soundproof. The most amazing demonstration I've ever seen was at Widescreen Review's new reference theater. When the door is closed you hear nothing even when the theater is ripping along at reference level. At best you hear the odd dull thud, barely, when there is extremely low bass sections. But it takes a lot of cash, planning, and execution to isolate your room to that degree.
     
  4. Ray2R

    Ray2R Auditioning

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    Hey guys thanks for your suggestions.

    Foregive me for what is probably a beginner question. Joel suggested that I "add some sheets of MDF under the sheet-rock." What is "MDF"?

    Thanks
     
  5. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    I think it stands for "medium density fiberboard".

    Unless you have loads of $$ to spend on sound isolation, you're going to have some bleedthrough no matter what you do. My HT is in my basement on the end that's completely underground. You can hear reference levels from outside through the ground. My walls are set apart from the block walls by about 2 inches in places, so my walls are basically isolated from the outside walls, but it still comes through.

    If the houses are framed, insulated, rocked on the inside and bricked the outside, and seperated by 3 feet, then I would try double sheetrock in the room, and maybe doubling up on the inwall insulation. Use R13 or better for some added absorption.

    If you still have more sound escaping than you want, you could try in room acoustical treatments.
     

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