Sound in an apartment

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Chris_Bullock, Feb 3, 2006.

  1. Chris_Bullock

    Chris_Bullock Auditioning

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    Hi all,
    First post here, so please be gentile [​IMG]

    I enjoy my movies. I enjoy my movies at night. I live in an apartment building with very little sound insulation. I have no sub--my fronts are putting out more than enough bass as it is right now (in terms of annoying the neighbors, not in terms of good sound). The fronts are some relatively cheap Technics with a 12" driver in each of them and stand about 2'6" - 3' high. Right now they're sitting flat on the carpet--a typical apartment building dense weave.

    Basically, I'd like to enjoy my movies at a reasonable volume (around 1 on the dial on my STR-DB 840 (100W x 5)) without annoying the people below me. At this moment they're the only ones I really need to concern myself with, since there's nobody in the apartment that shares a wall with me, and there's a hallway separating us on the other side.

    There's a couple of things I've thought to do, but don't know how effective they'd be. First, I'd probably want to get the speakers off the ground, right? That way they're more at ear-level, so I can get more sound coming directly at me, and I won't need to turn the volume up so loud, correct? What're some good ways of doing that? I have windows right behind the speakers, although they're recessed about 18", so I could use that as sort of a shelf, but I'd rather not block the windows. Also, that'd put the speakers about 2-3' behind the TV. The other thing I've been looking into are the cone (isolation?) feet for the speakers. Although after reading a little about them I'm not so sure they'd be productive toward my goal. My initial impresssion was that they'd limit the amount of vibrations going into the floor. And I think that I'm trying to limit the vibrations into the floor, correct? Also, I should mention that there's little that I can really do to the apartment itself. Obviously, I can't tear up the floorboards and pack more insulation or tear up the carpeting and build a floating floor or anything. But are there more temporary solutions that I could do, such as wall hangings or anything? I can do little things, though, such as putting in better sound isolation on the door, etc.

    Obviously, the best solution would be to buy a house, and that's right up there on my priorities, but I'm just looking for a quick fix. Not to make things more challenging, but whatever I do, I'd like it to be able to be transferrable too, so that I could take it with me when I move into a house when the time comes.

    Much obliged,
    Chris
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Welcome aboard, Chris.

    I'd say that you understand the challenges correctly. Yes, lifting your floorstanding speakers off the floor will help reduce the transmission of low frequencies and the ensuing vibrations to your neighbors below you.

    I'll let other members help you as to finding the best solutions for achieving this.
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    It’s really cheesy, but some of those square plastic tables with the legs that pop into the bottom will do it. I’m sure there are more elegant methods, but basically anything a couple feet high to set them on will get the job done.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Chris_Bullock

    Chris_Bullock Auditioning

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    Thanks for the replies guys.

    So, what I'm understanding from your response, Wayne, is that really, it's the sound that's being projected out of the front of the speaker that's more of the problem rather than vibrations going from the solid case directly into the solid floor (don't know if there's a special term for that or anything)? If that is the case, would putting some sound absorption on the walls help significantly, or are those more for limiting the amount of reflection within the listening space?

    -Chris
     
  5. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Won’t help. That stuff absorbs highs, but not lows. The only way to stop low frequencies is soundproofing measures, like double walls decoupled and double sheetrocked, etc. In other words, no cheap and easy solotion.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     

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