Sound deadening/blocking

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Glenn_J, Nov 12, 2003.

  1. Glenn_J

    Glenn_J Extra

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    Hello, first post here....

    We live in a raised ranch and our TV is setup in the downstairs living area. Right behind where we sit is a fireplace and our "utility room" that houses our oil fired boiler. The boiler makes a good amount of noise when it kicks on (even though it's new). The pump is pretty loud and you can hear the low rumble from the combustion.

    The outside of the utility room is finished the inside is not. There is a hollow door to access the room.

    I'd like to sound proof or at least reduce the amount of noise coming from that room. My first plan of action is to replace that hollow door with a solid one. From there, I'm open to suggestions. One part of the walls on the inside is down to the studs, so I could easily cover that up, it's just a question of with what. The other half of that wall is made of cinderblocks and is part of the backside of the chimney.

    Any sound proofing suggestions? I could post pictures if needed.

    Glenn
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    You’re on the right track by putting in the solid door. I would also finish out the interior of the utility room, and fill the wall space with some dense soundproofing material (hopefully someone will recommend what to use for that). Double sheet rock will help, too.

    One of the best soundproofing measures is making a room airtight. So, when you put up the sheet rock use a good sealer between it and the studs and header/footer boards. Also, completely weatherstrip around the door, as that is the most likely place to have an air leak. Be sure to put in a threshold or a sweep at the floor.

    This will go along way towards eliminating noise from the utility room. You may still have some of the low rumble, though. Low frequencies are extremely difficult to block.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. Glenn_J

    Glenn_J Extra

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    Thanks for the tips Wayne!

    I have heard that roofing paper can work in a similar manner to that "Dynomat" material the car audio enthusiasts use. However, I don't know if that presents a fire hazard or not.

    I've also heard that regular insulation is good for sound blocking. But given how warm the utility room gets now, I wouldn't want to hold more of that heat in!
     
  4. anth_c

    anth_c Stunt Coordinator

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    Glenn,

    Couple of comments:

    where does the boiler get it's air supply for combustion? If it gets from inside the room/house, trying to make the room too air tight will present a problem. On the other hand, if the combustion air comes from outdoors you are OK. Maybe you should check with an HVAC guy.

    Regarding the use of roofing paper: if you put it behind drywall, the fire hazard is virtually eliminated. Also, your local building code may require type X gypsum (fire-rated) near the boiler.
     
  5. Glenn_J

    Glenn_J Extra

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    I should have mentioned the air supply....

    The boiler doesn't have a direct "fresh air" source to the fire box; rather, it draws air from the surrounding area. However, there are two vent holes (about 4" in dia each) drilled into the side of an external facing wall. So, I "think" making the room air tight (from inside rooms) should be OK with that outside air source.

    Good call on the fireboard, I should look into that. If I recall, fireboard is usually a bit thicker than standard drywall. That would only help with the sound blocking.

    Does anyone know if roofing paper would work? Or should I just use some type of insulation?
     
  6. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    I don’t know that roofing paper has any sound deadening properties – can’t say that I’ve ever heard of anyone using it for that. I suggest doing a search for “soundproof,” “soundproofing” etc. on this Forum for more ideas of what materials work best - go back to the index page and scroll to the top for the search fields.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  7. Glenn_J

    Glenn_J Extra

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    Good idea.

    I did some digging and found this:

    [​IMG]

    (I guess I can't post URLs yet. Here's a C&P from a post on blocking furnace/boiler noise from the soundproffing.org forums)

     
  8. Erik Farstad

    Erik Farstad Supporting Actor

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    Glenn, I used Roofing Rolls, not the thin paper, in my theater...it looks just like roof shingles but comes in a continuous 4' wide role...little rocks on one side the whole bit. It is a dense asphalt based material and any "dense" material is a good sound absorber/blocker much like the expensive acoustibloc material you may have heard of. That coupled with insulated walls and sealed drywall...you should be good to go.

    You can also buy some "sound board" to put between the walls as well...that works extremely well in deadening sound and is typically used under hardwood floors to reduce sound between floors.

    I used all of the above and you can see how I did it by visting my site...just follow the link in my sig! [​IMG]

    Good luck!

    E
     
  9. JayPo

    JayPo Stunt Coordinator

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    Hello Glen,

    I don't have the ability yet to post a URL, but this sight seems to have a lot of good info: soundproofing.org/index.html
    Just add the www in front.
     
  10. Glenn_J

    Glenn_J Extra

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    Erik, amazing set up you have there! WOW!

    I looked closely at the wall cross section you posted. I think I'll end up doing something like that. How much is that sound board stuff? Similar in price to a sheet of drywall?

    Thanks Jay! That site has a ton of info.
     
  11. Erik Farstad

    Erik Farstad Supporting Actor

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    Glenn: Thanks! The soundboard is about $7/sheet if I remember correctly...so a bit more than drywall sheets but works great. It is basically condensed paper/carboard...so it is not as sturdy as sheet rock...and if you're wondering just us 1 1/2" or so roofing nails (that have the large/flat head on them) to attach the sounboard to your studs/wall...works great!

    E
     
  12. Glenn_J

    Glenn_J Extra

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    Cool, thanks!

    I may use the soundboard all the way up the walls in the boiler/furnace room.

    Does it make a difference if the soundboard is put up on top of the drywall or if it's put behind it?(directly againest the studs?)
     
  13. Erik Farstad

    Erik Farstad Supporting Actor

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    Glenn...no problem! Yes, put it the entire length of the wall...and I'd put it behind the drywall so that you have a hard surface in the furnace room...it will still work to reduce the sound whether behind or ontop of the drywall.

    E
     
  14. Glenn_J

    Glenn_J Extra

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    Excellent. I'll have to give that a try Erik.

    I'm going to hit an HVAC forum I occatoinally visit and see if the outside air vents are enough to supply the boiler with enough air.

    I want to make sure I do everything correctly. [​IMG]
     
  15. DougKuhn

    DougKuhn Stunt Coordinator

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    Psst. Glenn, welcome! [​IMG]
     
  16. Erik Farstad

    Erik Farstad Supporting Actor

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    Have fun Glenn and good luck! [​IMG]

    E
     
  17. Terry Montlick

    Terry Montlick Stunt Coordinator

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    About soundboard ...

    The acoustic specs of soundboard are hard to find. But as far as I know, it is no better than a second layer of drywall at sound isolation. Homasote brand advertises an STC of 45 for a single stud wood-framed wall - Homasote on both sides, underneath the drywall. That's about the same as a second layer of drywall on both sides.

    You put the soundboard behind the drywall - it works to decouple sound transmission, but only if you fasten the drywall to it alone, so that the screws don't breach the decoupling by reaching the underlying studs.

    This principle is the same as using resilient channel (RC-1) to decouple the wall. However, it is inferior in sound isolation to resilient channel. You get a comparable amount of isolation from resilient channel on one side as you do from soundboard or double drywall on both sides. Resilient channel can also be used with double layers of drywall to yield even higher sound isolation - up to STC 55.

    Regards,
    Terry
     
  18. Glenn_J

    Glenn_J Extra

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    Terry,
    What's a resilient channel?
     
  19. Terry Montlick

    Terry Montlick Stunt Coordinator

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    Resilient channel is a metal, Z-shaped building product. It is specially designed to isolate sound. It has a flexible portion which functions kind of like a shock absorber. It's been around for maybe 50 years, and is a standard material for architectural acoustics.

    Lengths of ordinary resilient channel (also called RC-1) are fastened to studs crosswise, about every 2 feet from floor to ceiling. Sheetrock is then fastened to the resilient channel, but not to the studs below. Vibration of the sheetrock causes the resilient channel to flex, and this reduces the sound vibrations transmitted to the studs and thereby the other surface of the wall.
     
  20. Glenn_J

    Glenn_J Extra

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    Ahhh, I see. I did some googling and found some pics. Thanks for your help. [​IMG]
     

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